Pile (heraldry)
In heraldry, a pile is a charge usually counted as one of the ordinaries (figures bounded by straight lines and occupying a definite portion of the shield). It consists of a wedge emerging from the ...
Pile (heraldry) - Wikipedia
Gyron
A gyron is a triangular heraldic ordinary formed by two lines extending from the edge of the shield to meet at the center at a 45° angle. A shield divided into eight gyrons is called gyronny. The wo...
List of Canadian flags
This is a list of flags used in Canada. The Department of Canadian Heritage lays out protocol guidelines for the display of flags, including an order of precedence; these instructions are only convent...
List of Canadian flags - Wikipedia
Quadrate (heraldry)
In heraldry, an ordinary is described as quadrate (or more fully nowy quadrate) when it has a square central boss.Only certain ordinaries are usually shown quadrate: the cross, the pale, and the fess ...
Quadrate (heraldry) - Wikipedia
Flag of Norfolk Island
The flag of Norfolk Island was adopted on 17 January 1980. It depicts the Norfolk Island Pine (Araucaria heterophylla) in a central white stripe between two green stripes.The flag's geometry is a trib...
Flag of Saint Vincent and the Grenadines
The flag of Saint Vincent and the Grenadines was adopted on October 21, 1985. It is composed of three vertical bands of blue, yellow and green (the yellow band forming a Canadian pale being half the w...
Flag of Saint Vincent and the Grenadines - Wikipedia
Saltire
A saltire is a heraldic symbol in the form of a diagonal cross, like the shape of the letter X in Roman type. Saint Andrew is said to have been martyred on such a cross. In the Russian Orthodox tradit...
Saltire - Wikipedia
Pall (heraldry)
A pall (or pairle) is a Y-shaped heraldic charge, normally having its arms in the three corners of the shield. An example of a pall placed horizontally (fesswise) is the green portion of the Flag of S...
Pall (heraldry) - Wikipedia
Fess
In heraldry, a fess or fesse (from Middle English fesse, from Old French, from Latin fascia, "band") is a charge on a coat of arms that takes the form of a band running horizontally across the centre ...
Fess - Wikipedia
Chevron (insignia)
A chevron (also spelled cheveron, especially in older documents) is a V-shaped pattern. The word is usually used in reference to a kind of fret in architecture, or to a badge or insignia used in milit...
Chevron (insignia) - Wikipedia
Spanish fess
In vexillology, a Spanish fess is a term occasionally used to describe the central horizontal stripe of a tricolour or triband flag that is twice the width of the stripes on either side of it.The name...
Spanish fess - Wikipedia
Flag of Iowa
The flag of the state of Iowa is a vertical tricolor of blue, white, and red, reflecting Iowa's history as part of the French Louisiana Territory. (Because of the wider middle stripe and symmetric d...
Flag of Iowa - Wikipedia
Ordinary (heraldry)
In heraldry, an ordinary (or honourable ordinary) is a simple geometrical figure, bounded by straight lines and running from side to side or top to bottom of the shield. There are also some geometric ...
Ordinary (heraldry) - Wikipedia
Canadian pale
In vexillology a Canadian pale is a centre band of a vertical triband flag (a pale in heraldry) that covers half the length of a flag, rather than a third in most triband designs. This allows more spa...
Canadian pale - Wikipedia
Flaunch
In heraldry, a flaunch (/flɔːntʃ/; also called flanches, flanks, flasks and voiders) are among the ordinaries or subordinaries, consisting of two arcs of circles protruding into the field from the sid...
Flaunch - Wikipedia
Chief (heraldry)
In heraldic blazon, a chief is a charge on a coat of arms that takes the form of a band running horizontally across the top edge of the shield. Writers disagree in how much of the shield's surface is ...
Chief (heraldry) - Wikipedia
Bend (heraldry)
In heraldry, a bend is a band or strap running from the upper dexter (the bearer's right side and the viewer's left) corner of the shield to the lower sinister (the bearer's left side, and the viewer'...
Canton (heraldry)
Canton is a square charge placed in the upper dexter corner. It is classed by some heraldic writers as one of the honorable ordinaries; but, strictly speaking, it is a diminutive of the Quarter, being...
Canton (heraldry) - Wikipedia
Orle (heraldry)
In heraldry, an orle is a subordinary consisting of a narrow band occupying the inward half of where a bordure would be, following the exact outline of the shield but within it, showing the field betw...
Orle (heraldry) - Wikipedia
Variations of ordinaries
Ordinaries in heraldry are sometimes embellished with stripes of colour alongside them, have lumps added to them, shown with their edges arciform instead of straight, have their peaks and tops choppe...
Variations of ordinaries - Wikipedia
Pale (heraldry)
A pale is a term used in heraldic blazon and vexillology to describe a charge on a coat of arms (or flag), that takes the form of a band running vertically down the center of the shield. Writers broad...
Pale (heraldry) - Wikipedia
Line (heraldry)
The lines of partition used to divide and vary fields and charges in heraldry are by default straight, but may have many different shapes. Care must sometimes be taken to distinguish these types of l...
Line (heraldry) - Wikipedia
Bar (heraldry)
In heraldry, a bar is an ordinary consisting of a horizontal band across the shield. If only one bar appears across the middle of the shield, it is termed a fess; if two or more appear, they can only ...
Bar (heraldry) - Wikipedia