History of medieval Christianity
The history of Christianity during the Middle Ages is the history of Christianity between the Fall of Rome (c. 476) and the onset of the Protestant Reformation during the early 16th century, the...
History of medieval Christianity - Wikipedia
Key Moments in the Crusades: An Interactive Map
Though they began over 900 years ago, the Crusades remain one of the most dynamic areas of historical inquiry. Such is the breadth of the events that are referenced by the word 'crusade', it's difficu...
History of late ancient Christianity
The History of Late Ancient Christianity traces Christianity during the Christian Roman Empire - the period from the rise of Christianity under Emperor Constantine (c. 313), until the fall of the Roma...
History of late ancient Christianity - Wikipedia
History of modern Christianity
The history of modern Christianity concerns the Christian religion from the end of the Early Modern era to the present day. The Early Modern history of Christianity is usually taken to begin with the ...
History of modern Christianity - Wikipedia
Christianity in the 6th century
In 6th century Christianity, Roman Emperor Justinian launched a military campaign in Constantinople to reclaim the western provinces from the Arian Germans, starting with North Africa and proceeding...
Christianity in the 6th century - Wikipedia
Christianity in the 7th century
The Western (Latin) and Eastern (Greek) divisions of Christianity began to take on distinctive shape in 7th century Christianity. Whereas in the East the Church maintained its structure and character...
Christianity in the 7th century - Wikipedia
Christianity in the 8th century
Christianity in the 8th century was much affected by the rise of Islam in the Middle East. By the late 8th century, the Muslim empire had conquered all of Persia and parts of the Eastern Roman (Byza...
Christianity in the 8th century - Wikipedia
Franks
The Franks (Latin: Franci or gens Francorum) are historically first known as a group of Germanic tribes occupying land in the Lower and Middle Rhine in the 3rd century AD. Some Franks raided Roman...
Franks - Wikipedia
Merovingian
The Merovingians (/ˌmɛroʊˈvɪndʒɪən/) were a Salian Frankish dynasty that ruled the Franks for nearly 300 years in a region known as Francia in Latin, beginning in the middle of the 5th century AD. The...
Merovingian - Wikipedia
Iconoclasm (Byzantine)
Byzantine Iconoclasm (Greek: Εἰκονομαχία, Eikonomachía) refers to two periods in the history of the Byzantine Empire when the use of religious images or icons was opposed by religious and imperial...
Iconoclasm (Byzantine) - Wikipedia
Christianity in the 9th century
In 9th century Christianity, Charlemagne was crowned as Holy Roman Emperor, which continued the Photian schism.
On Christmas day in 800, the Roman Patriarch Leo III crowned Charles (Charlemagne in...
Christianity in the 9th century - Wikipedia
Christianity in the 10th century
By the 10th century, Christianity had spread throughout much of Europe and Asia. The Church of England was becoming well established, with its scholarly monasteries, and the Roman Church and the Easte...
Christianity in the 10th century - Wikipedia
Christianity in the 11th century
Christianity in the 11th century is marked primarily by the Great Schism of the Church, which formally divided the State church of the Roman Empire into Eastern (Greek) and Western (Latin) branches.In...
Christianity in the 11th century - Wikipedia
Christianity in the 12th century
Christianity in the 12th century was marked by a continuation of the Crusades, namely with the Second Crusade in the Holy Land.
The English dispute was resolved by the Concordat of London, 1107, w...
Christianity in the 12th century - Wikipedia
Christianity in the 13th century
The Eastern Roman (Byzantine) imperial church headed by Constantinople continued to assert its universal authority. By the 13th century this assertion was becoming increasingly irrelevant as the Easte...
Christianity in the 13th century - Wikipedia
Photian schism
The Photian Schism was a four-year (863–867) schism between the episcopal sees of Rome and Constantinople.At issue was the papal claim to jurisdiction in the East, not accusations of heresy. The sch...
Photian schism - Wikipedia
Investiture Controversy
The Investiture Controversy or Investiture Contest was the most significant conflict between Church and state in medieval Europe. In the 11th and 12th centuries, a series of popes challenged the aut...
Crusades
The Crusades were military campaigns sanctioned by the Latin Roman Catholic Church during the High Middle Ages and Late Middle Ages. In 1095, Pope Urban II proclaimed the First Crusade with the stated...
Crusades - Wikipedia
Christianity in the 14th century
Christianity in the 14th century consisted of an end to the Crusades and a precursor to Protestantism.
King Philip IV of France created an inquisition for his suppression of the Knights Templar du...
Christianity in the 14th century - Wikipedia
Christianity in the 15th century
The 15th century in Christianity is part of the High Middle Ages, the period from the coronation of Charlemagne in 800 to the close of the 15th century, which saw the fall of Constantinople (1453), th...
Christianity in the 15th century - Wikipedia
Hesychasm
Hesychasm (Greek: ἡσυχασμός, hesychasmos, from ἡσυχία, hesychia, "stillness, rest, quiet, silence") is a mystical tradition of prayer in the Eastern Orthodox Church and Eastern Catholic Churches o...
Western Schism
The Western Schism or Papal Schism was a split within the Roman Catholic Church from 1378 to 1417. Several men simultaneously claimed to be the true pope. Driven by politics rather than any theologica...
Western Schism - Wikipedia
Avignon Papacy
The Avignon Papacy was the period from 1309 to 1377, during which seven successive popes resided in Avignon, in France, rather than in Rome. This situation arose from the conflict between the Papacy a...
Avignon Papacy - Wikipedia
Fall of Constantinople
The Fall of Constantinople (Greek: Άλωση της Κωνσταντινούπολης, Alōsē tēs Kōnstantinoupolēs; Turkish: İstanbul'un Fethi Conquest of Istanbul) was the capture of the capital of the Eastern Roma...
Fall of Constantinople - Wikipedia
Ghazi II Saif ud-Din
Saif ud-Din Ghazi II (Arabic: سيف الدين غازي بن مودود; full name: Saif ad-Din Ghazi II Bin Mawdud Bin Imad ad-Din Atabeg Zengi; died 1180) was a Zangid emir of Mosul, the nephew of Nur ad-Din Zengi. H...
Lordship of Sidon
The Lordship of Sidon was one of the four major fiefdoms of the Kingdom of Jerusalem, one of the Crusader States. However, in reality, it appears to have been much smaller than the others and had the ...
Patroclus of Bourges
Saint Patroclus of Bourges (c. 496–576) was a Merovingian ascetic, who was a native of the province of Berry, France. In his Historia Francorum, Gregory of Tours writes that Patroclus became a priest...
Norwegian Crusade
The Norwegian Crusade was a crusade that lasted from 1107 to 1110, in the aftermath of the First Crusade, led by Norwegian king Sigurd I. Sigurd was the first Scandinavian king to go on crusade to the...
Norwegian Crusade - Wikipedia
Government of the Carolingian Empire
The government, administration, and organisation of the Carolingian Empire were forged in the court of Charlemagne in the decades around the year 800. In this year, Charlemagne was crowned emperor and...
Government of the Carolingian Empire - Wikipedia
Zwentibold
Zwentibold (or Zventibold, Swentiboldo, 1 January 870 – 13 August 900) was the illegitimate son of the Carolingian Emperor Arnulf of Carinthia. In 895, his father, then king of East Francia, granted h...
Zwentibold - Wikipedia