History of the Assyrian people
The history of the Assyrian people begins with the formation of Assyria circa 2500 BC, followed by rise of the Akkadian Empire during the 24th century BC, in the early bronze age period. Sargon of Akk...
History of the Assyrian people - Wikipedia
Neo-Assyrian Empire
The Neo-Assyrian Empire was an empire in Mesopotamian history which began in 911 BC and ended in 609 BC. During this period, Assyria assumed a position as the most powerful state on Earth, successfull...
Neo-Assyrian Empire - Wikipedia
Roman Syria
Syria was an early Roman province, annexed to the Roman Republic in 64 BC by Pompey in the Third Mithridatic War following the defeat of Armenian King Tigranes the Great. Following the partition of th...
Roman Syria - Wikipedia
Assyria (Persian province)
Assyria may refer to:
Syriac Christianity
Syriac Christianity (Syriac: ܡܫܝܚܝܘܬܐ ܣܘܪܝܝܬܐ / mšiḥāiūṯā suryāiṯā) encompasses the multiple Churches of Eastern Christianity whose services tend to feature liturgical use of ancient Syriac, a dia...
Syriac Christianity - Wikipedia
History of Eastern Christianity
Christianity has been, historically a Middle Eastern religion with its origin in Hebrew tribal Judaism. Eastern Christianity refers collectively to the Christian traditions and churches which develope...
Assyrian Genocide
The Assyrian genocide (also known as Sayfo or Seyfo, Syriac: ܩܛܠܐ ܕܥܡܐ ܣܘܪܝܝܐ or ܣܝܦܐ) refers to the mass slaughter of the Assyrian population of the Ottoman Empire during the First World War, in ...
Assyrian Genocide - Wikipedia
Assyrianism
Assyrian nationalism or Assyrianism increased in popularity in the late 19th century in a climate of increasing ethnic and religious persecution of the indigenous Assyrians of the Middle East.Assyrian...
Assyrianism - Wikipedia
Assyrian naming dispute
The various ethnic communities of indigenous pre-Arab, Semitic and often Neo-Aramaic-speaking Christian people of Iraq, Syria, Iran, Turkey, Lebanon, Jordan Palestine and Israel, advocate different te...
Assyrian naming dispute - Wikipedia
Assyrian diaspora
The Assyrian/Chaldean/Syriac diaspora (Galuta) refers to the estimated population of indigenous ethnic Assyrians who share a common language of Eastern Aramaic and ancient Assyria in-Upper Mesopotamia...
Assyrian diaspora - Wikipedia
Assyrian independence
The Assyrian struggle for Independence is an ongoing struggle for independence for the Assyrian Nation in its historical homeland. Originally, it was waged by the Assyrian Patriarch and the chiefs (As...
Assyrian independence - Wikipedia
Assyrian nationalism
Assyrian nationalism or Assyrianism increased in popularity in the late 19th century in a climate of increasing ethnic and religious persecution of the indigenous Assyrians of the Middle East.Assyrian...
Schism of 1552
The Schism of 1552 was an important event in the history of the Church of the East. It divided the church into two factions, of which one entered into communion with Rome and the other remained indep...
Schism of 1552 - Wikipedia
Assyrian art and architecture
The architecture of Mesopotamian is the ancient architecture of the region of the Tigris–Euphrates river system (also known as Mesopotamia), encompassing several distinct cultures and spanning a perio...
Assyrian art and architecture - Wikipedia
Seleucia at the Zeugma
Seleucia at the Zeugma (Greek: Σελεύκεια ἐπὶ τοῦ Ζεύγματος, transliterated Seleucia epi tou Zeugmatos or Seleukeia epi tou Zeugmatos) was a Hellenistic city or fortified town in the present Republ...
Seleucia at the Zeugma - Wikipedia
Ashur-shaduni
Aššur-šaddûni or -šaduni, inscribed aš-šur--ú-ni or [aš-šur-]-u-ni and meaning “(the god) Aššur (is) our mountain,” was the ruler of Assyria for just "one complete month" (1 -te) during the mid-15th c...
Ilu-shuma
Ilu-šūma, inscribed DINGIR-šum-ma, son of Šalim-ahum was the 32nd king of Assyria, ca. 1900 BC (short chronology). The length of his reign is uncertain, as the Assyrian King List records him as one of...
Naum Faiq
Naum Elias Yaqub Palakh (February 1868 – February 5, 1930), better known as Naum Faiq (Syriac: ܢܥܘܡ ܦܐܝܩ, Naˁum Fayëq) was one of the founding fathers of modern Assyrian nationalism during the e...
Naum Faiq - Wikipedia
Edessa
Edessa (/ɪˈdɛsə/; Ancient Greek: Ἔδεσσα; Classical Syriac: ܐܘܪܗܝ Urhay; Armenian: Եդեսիա) is the historical name of an ancient town in upper Mesopotamia, refounded on an ancient site by S...
Edessa - Wikipedia
Apamea (Euphrates)
Apamea or Apameia (Greek: Απάμεια) was a Hellenistic city on the left (viz.,the east) bank of the Euphrates, opposite the famous city of Zeugma, at the end of a bridge of boats (Greek: zeugma) con...
Beth Garmai
Beth Garmai, (Arabic: باجرمي‎ Bājarmī, Persian/Kurdish: Garmakan, Classical Syriac: ܒܝܬ ܓܪܡܐ Bêṯ Garmē, Latin and Greek Garamaea) is a historical region around the city of Kirkuk in nort...
Beth Garmai - Wikipedia
Achaemenid Assyria
Athura (Neo-Aramaic for Assyria) was a geographical area within the Persian Achaemenid Empire held by the last nobility of Aššur (Akkadian), known as Athura (Neo-Aramaic) or Atouria (Greek), during th...
Achaemenid Assyria - Wikipedia
Shamshi-Adad III
Shamshi-Adad III was the King of Assyria from 1545 BC to 1529 BC. He was the son of Ishme-Dagan II.
Shalim-ahum
Šalim-ahum was the earliest independent ruler of the city-state of Assur to be attested in a contemporary inscription. The Assyrian Kinglist records his name as Šallim-aḫḫe, inscribed šal-lim-PAB-MEŠ,...
Shamshi-ilu
Shamshi-ilu was an influential court dignitary and commander in chief (turtanu) of the Assyrian army who rose in high prominence
Shamshi-ilu probably was not born in Assyria, though he was from no...
Ashur-nirari II
Aššur-nērārī II, inscribed aš-šur- (=), "(the god) Aššur is my help," was the king of Assyria, the 68th to appear on the Assyrian Kinglist, ca. 1424–1418 BC or 1414–1408 BC depending on a later uncert...
Puzur-Ashur III
Puzur-Ashur III was the king of Assyria from 1503 BC to 1479 BC. According to the Assyrian King List, he was the son and successor of Ashur-nirari I and ruled for 24 years. He is also the first Assyri...
Puzur-Ashur III - Wikipedia