Hittites
The Hittites (/ˈhɪtaɪts/) were an Anatolian people who established an empire at Hattusa in north-central Anatolia around 1600 BC. This empire reached its height during the mid-14th century BC under Su...
Hittites - Wikipedia
Hittites - Lost Cities of the Ancients 3 The Dark Lords of Hattusha.
More than 3000 years ago a mysterious and ruthless civilization rose from nothing, created a brutal and unstoppable army and built an empire that rivalled E...
Battle of Kadesh - Video
Aftermath of the Battle of Kadesh...
History of the Hittites
The Hittites (/ˈhɪtaɪts/) were an Anatolian people who established an empire at Hattusa in north-central Anatolia around 1600 BC. This empire reached its height during the mid-14th century BC under Su...
History of the Hittites - Wikipedia
Hittite sites
The geography of the Hittite Empire is inferred from Hittite texts on the one hand, and from archaeological excavation on the other. Matching philology to archaeology is a difficult and ongoing task, ...
Hattusa
Hattusa (Hittite: 𒌷𒄩𒀜𒌅𒊭, Ḫa-at-tu-ša, read "Ḫattuša", Turkish: Hattuşaş) was the capital of the Hittite Empire in the late Bronze Age. Its ruins lie near modern Boğazkale, Turkey, within the ...
Hattusa - Wikipedia
Hittite language
Hittite (natively nešili "[in the language] of Neša"), also known as Nesite and Neshite, is the extinct language once spoken by the Hittites, an Indo-European people who created an empire centred on...
Hittite mythology
Hittite mythology and Hittite religion were the religious beliefs and practices of the Hittites, who created an empire centered in what is now modern-day Turkey from ca. 1,600 BC to 1,180 BC anMost of...
Hittite mythology - Wikipedia
Hittite Empire
The Hittites (/ˈhɪtaɪts/) were an Anatolian people who established an empire at Hattusa in north-central Anatolia around 1600 BC. This empire reached its height during the mid-14th century BC under Su...
Hittite Empire - Wikipedia
Hittite military oath
The Hittite military oath (CTH 427) is a Hittite text on two cuneiform tablets.The first tablet is only preserved in fragments (KBo XXI 10, KUB XL 13, and minor fragments), the second tablet survives ...
Hittite military oath - Wikipedia
Ishara
Ishara (išḫara) is the Hittite word for "treaty, binding promise", also personified as a goddess of the oath.In Hurrian and Semitic traditions, Išḫara is a love goddess, often identified with Ishtar. ...
Salatiwara
Salatiwara was a city of Bronze Age Anatolia. It was besieged by Anitta in the 18th century BC with 1400 infantry and 40 chariots.
Hittite texts
The corpus of texts written in the Hittite language is indexed by the Catalogue des Textes Hittites (CTH, since 1971). The catalogue is only a classification of texts; it does not give the texts. One ...
Liste der archaischen Keilschriftzeichen
Liste der archaischen Keilschriftzeichen (LAK, "list of archaic cuneiform signs")is a dictionary of Sumerian cuneiform signs of the pre-classical Fara period (Early Dynastic II, 28th to 27th centuries...
Hayasa-Azzi
Hayasa-Azzi or Azzi-Hayasa (Armenian: Հայասա) was a Late Bronze Age confederation formed between two kingdoms of Armenian Highlands, Hayasa located South of Trabzon and Azzi, located north of the ...
Hayasa-Azzi - Wikipedia
Alaca Höyük
34°41′44″E / 40.23444°N 34.69556°E / 40.23444; 34.69556Alacahöyük or Alaca Höyük (sometimes also spelled as Alacahüyük, Aladja-Hoyuk, Euyuk, or Evuk) is the site of a Neolithi...
Alaca Höyük - Wikipedia
Gal dubsar
The gal dubsar was a Hittite administrative title literally meaning "chief of the scribes". It is considered to be one of most important and prestigious posts of the Hittite Empire as the gal dubsar w...
Tarsus, Mersin
Tarsus (/ˈtɑrsəs/; Hittite: Tarsa; Greek: Ταρσός; Armenian: Տարսոն) is a historic city in south-central Turkey, 20 km inland from the Mediterranean. It is part of the Adana-Mersin Metropolitan Ar...
Tarsus, Mersin - Wikipedia
Zidanta I
Zidanta I was a king of the Hittites (Old Kingdom), ruling for 10 years, ca. 1496–1486 BC (short chronology timeline). According to the Telepinu Proclamation, this king became a ruler by murder.
Z...
Egyptian–Hittite peace treaty
The Egyptian–Hittite peace treaty was concluded between Egyptian Pharaoh Ramesses II and Hittite King Hattusili III. According to most Egyptologists it was concluded in or around 1259 BC, marking the ...
Egyptian–Hittite peace treaty - Wikipedia
Hazzi
Mount Aqra` (Arabic: جبل الأقرع‎ ǧabal al-Aqra` [ˈd͡ʒæbæl al ˈʔaqraʕ]); the biblical Hor H'har הר ההר or Zaphon, Kel Dağı in Turkish, Mount Casius to the Greeks, and Mount Hazzi to the Hurri...
Hazzi - Wikipedia
Puduhepa
Puduhepa (Hittite: Pudu-Ḫepa, or Pudu-Kheba) (fl. 13th century BC) was a Hittite queen married to the King Hattusili III. She has been referred to as "one of the most influential women known from the ...
Puduhepa - Wikipedia
Samuha
Šamuḫa (possibly sited at Kasanlı Pıran) was a city of the Hittites, a religious centre and for a few years military capital for the empire. Samuha's faith was syncretistic. Rene Lebrun in 1976 cal...