Hungarian mythology
Hungarian mythology includes the myths, legends, folk tales, fairy tales and gods of the Hungarians or Magyars. Many parts of it are believed lost since only some texts remain which can be classified ...
Hungarian mythology - Wikipedia
Shamanistic remnants in Hungarian folklore
Hungarian shamanism is discovered through comparative methods in ethnology, designed to analyse and search ethnographic data of Hungarian folktales, songs, language, comparative cultures and historica...
Shamanistic remnants in Hungarian folklore - Wikipedia
Táltos
The táltos (also "tátos") [taːltoʃ] is a figure in Hungarian mythology similar to a shaman.
According to Roman Catholic priest Arnold Ipolyi, in his book "Magyar mitológia" (Hungarian Mythology) ...
Hadúr
Hadúr, or Hodúr in old Hungarian, short for Hadak Ura, meaning "warlord" or "lord of the armies" in Hungarian, was the god of fire, later became a war god in the religion of the early Hungarians (Magy...
Ördög
The Ördög (Urdung in Old Hungarian and in Turkic mythology equivalent to Erlik) is a shape-shifting, demonic creature from Hungarian mythology which personifies the dark and evil aspects of the world....
Turul
The Turul is the most important bird in the origin myth of the Magyars (Hungarian people).It is a divine messenger, and perches on top of the tree of life along with the other spirits of unborn childr...
Turul - Wikipedia
Szelatya
Szélatya (or Szélkirály, Turkish: Yel Ata, Old Turkic: Çel Ede or Çel Ata) is the Hungarian god or deity of wind. He is a Hun (Onoghur) god too. In Turkic languages Yel (or Cel / Çel) means wind. The ...
Égig érő fa
The égig érő fa ("sky-high tree"), also called életfa ("tree of life"), világfa ("world tree"), or tetejetlen fa ("tree without a top"), is an element of Hungarian shamanism and native faith, and a ty...
White horse (mythology)
White horses (which are rarer than other colours of horse) have a special significance in the mythologies of cultures around the world. They are often associated with the sun chariot, with warrior-her...
White horse (mythology) - Wikipedia
Neopaganism in Hungary
Neopaganism in Hungary (Hungarian: Újpogányság) is very diverse, with followers of the Hungarian native faith and of other religions, including Wiccans, Kemetics, Mithraics, Druids and Christopagans.S...
Neopaganism in Hungary - Wikipedia
Prince Csaba
In Hungarian mythology, Prince Csaba was the youngest son of Attila, King of the Huns. A fierce and skilled warrior, he led the Huns to victory in all the battles they encountered over the ages. But a...
Prince Csaba - Wikipedia
Hungarian Neopaganism
Hungarian Neopaganism, the Hungarian Native Faith, or Ősmagyar Vallás (Hungarian expression meaning Ancient Hungarian Religion, or more accurately Arch-Hungarian Religion) as it is called in the local...
Hungarian Neopaganism - Wikipedia
King Matjaž
King Matjaž/Mátyás (Slovene: Kralj Matjaž, Hungarian: Mátyás király) is a legendary king in Slovenia, Hungary, Croatia and in some other countries, based on pre-Christian traditions of Caranta...
King Matjaž - Wikipedia
Lidérc
A Liderc, or Lidérc [ˈlideːrts], is a unique supernatural being of Hungarian folklore. It has three known varieties, which often borrow traits from one another.The first, more traditional form of the ...
Nachtkrapp
The Nachtkrapp (German, lit. Night Raven) is a South German and Austrian bugbear creature, cautionary tales about which are used to scare children into going to bed. Similar legends exist in Hungary, ...
Szelanya
Szélanya (Turkish: Yel Ana, Old Turkic: Çel Ene or Cel Ana) is the Hungarian goddess or deity of wind. She is a Hun (Onoghur) goddess too. In Turkic languages Yel (or Cel / Çel) means wind. The word A...