Jötunn
The jötnar (anglicized jotunn or jotun, plural jötnar; /ˈjoʊtən/, /ˈjoʊtʊn/, or /ˈjɔːtʊn/; Icelandic: [ˈjœːtʏn]; from Old Norse jǫtunn /ˈjɔtunː/; often glossed as giant or ettin) can be seen throughou...
Jötunn - Wikipedia
Ragnarök
In Norse mythology, Ragnarök is a series of future events, including a great battle foretold to ultimately result in the death of a number of major figures (including the gods Odin, Thor, Týr, Freyr, ...
Ragnarök - Wikipedia
Troll
A troll is a supernatural being in Norse mythology and Scandinavian folklore. In origin, troll may have been a negative synonym for a jötunn (plural jötnar). In Old Norse sources, beings described as ...
Brimir
In Norse mythology, Brimir is another name for the giant Ymir and also the name of a hall for the souls of the virtuous following the endtime conflict of Ragnarok.In the Gylfaginning section of the Pr...
Fárbauti
In Norse mythology, Fárbauti (Old Norse: "cruel striker") is the jötunn husband of Laufey or Nál and the father of Loki, and possibly also of Helblindi and Byleistr. He is attested in the Prose Edda, ...
Baugi
In Norse mythology, Baugi is a giant. He is the son of Gilling, brother of Suttungr and paternal uncle of Gunnlöð.Baugi is attested to in Skáldskaparmál in Snorri's Prose Edda, and does not appear in ...
Baugi - Wikipedia
Narfi
In Norse mythology, Narfi or Nörfi (Nǫrfi), also called Nörr (Nǫrr), is the father of Nótt, the personified night.
According to the Gylfaginning section of Snorri Sturluson's Prose Edda, Nótt is t...
Beli (jötunn)
In Norse mythology Beli is probably a giant. He was killed by Freyr.In scaldic and Eddic poetry, Freyr is sometimes called "Beli's enemy" (Belja dólgr, in Eyvindr skáldaspillir's Háleygjatal, ) or "Be...
Býleistr
Býleistr ('bee-lightning', sometimes anglicised Byleist) is the brother of Loki in Norse mythology.Nothing is known about him apart from this kinship. Snorri Sturluson states in his Gylfaginning that...
Hrímnir
Hrímnir is a giant frequently mentioned in Norse mythology.In Hyndluljóð verse 32 he is the father of Heiðr and Hrossþjófr, but that may be just for alliteration's sake. He is mentioned in Skírnismál ...
Móði and Magni
In Norse mythology, Móði (anglicized Módi or Mothi) and Magni are the sons of Thor. Their names mean "Angry" and "Strong," respectively. Rudolf Simek states that, along with Thor's daughter Þrúðr ("St...
Litr
In Norse mythology Litr (often anglicized as Lit, confer Icelandic litur), which means "colour", is a name borne by a dwarf and a giant.
In Snorri Sturluson's Gylfaginning , Litr is kicked into Ba...
Litr - Wikipedia
Jörð
In Norse mythology, Jörð (Icelandic "earth", pronounced [ˈjœrð] and from Old Norse jǫrð, pronounced [ˈjɔrð], sometimes Anglicized as Jord or Jorth; also called Jarð, [jɑrð] as in Old East Norse), is a...
Jörð - Wikipedia
Útgarða-Loki
In Norse mythology, Útgarða-Loki (Anglicized as Utgarda-Loki and Utgard-Loki) was the ruler of the castle Útgarðr in Jötunheimr. He was one of the Jötnar and his name means literally "Loki of the Outy...
Útgarða-Loki - Wikipedia
Logi
In Norse mythology, Logi, Loge (Old Norse "fire") or Hálogi ("High Flame") is a fire giant, god and personification of fire. He is son of giant Fornjótr and brother of Ægir (sea giant) and Kári (god o...
Nótt
In Norse mythology, Nótt (Old Norse "night") is night personified, grandmother of Thor. In both the Poetic Edda, compiled in the 13th century from earlier traditional sources, and the Prose Edda, writ...
Nótt - Wikipedia
Aurboða
In Norse mythology, Aurboða (Old Norse "gravel-bidder" or "gravel-offerer") is a mountain jötunn, wife to the jötunn Gymir, and mother of Gerðr.
Aurboða is attested in the Poetic Edda; compiled in...
Ymir
In Norse mythology, Ymir, Aurgelmir, Brimir, or Bláinn is a primeval being born of primordial elemental poison and the ancestor of all jötnar. Ymir is attested in the Poetic Edda, compiled in the 13th...
Ymir - Wikipedia
Hrímgerðr
In Norse mythology, Hrímgerðr ("frost-Gerðr") is a female jötunn. Hrímgerðr is attested in Poetic Edda poem Helgakviða Hjörvarðssonar, where she engages in heated flyting with Atli Indmundsson.
Gjálp and Greip
In Norse mythology, Gjálp and Greip are two giantesses.
According to Skáldskaparmál they were daughters of the giant Geirröðr. As Thor was wading across Vimur the river "waxed so greatly that it b...
Gjálp and Greip - Wikipedia
Gilling
In Norse mythology, Gilling was the frost giant, father of Suttungr and Baugi and grandfather of Gunnlöð. He and his wife were murdered by Fjalar and Galar. Gilling is also a surname, although not ver...
Harðgreipr
Harthgrepa or Harðgreip in Old Norse (« Hard-grip ») is a giantess who appears in the legend of the Norse hero Hadingus, which is reported by Saxo Grammaticus in his Gesta Danorum.
After...
Þjazi
In Norse mythology, Þjazi (anglicized as Thiazi, Thjazi, Tjasse or Thiassi) was a giant. He was a son of the giant Olvaldi, brother of giants Idi and Gangr, and the father of Skaði. His most notable m...
Þjazi - Wikipedia
Gangr
In Norse mythology, Gangr or Gang (Old Norse, 'gait') was a giant and a son of Ölvaldi, along with his brothers Þjazi and Iði. According to Skáldskaparmál, Ölvaldi was very rich in gold, and when he d...
Hymir
In Norse mythology, Hymir is a giant, husband of the giantess Hroðr and according to the Eddic poem Hymiskviða the father of the god Týr. He is the owner of a mile-wide cauldron which the Æsir wanted ...
Hymir - Wikipedia
Hrungnir
Hrungnir (Old Norse "brawler") was a jötunn in Norse mythology, slain by the god Thor with his hammer Mjölnir. The account is documented in the Skáldskaparmál, in the Prose Edda by Snorri Sturluson.Pr...
Hrungnir - Wikipedia
Gunnlöð
In Norse mythology, Gunnlöð (Old Norse "battle-invitation") is a jötunn.
Gunnlöð is daughter of the giant Suttungr, who was set guard by him in the mountain Hnitbjorg where he housed the mead of p...
Gunnlöð - Wikipedia
Hroðr
In Norse mythology, Hroðr (Old Norse "famed") is a female jötunn (giantess) friendly to the Æsir and the wife of the jötunn Hymir. According to the Eddic poem Hymiskviða she is the mother of Týr, the ...
Hræsvelgr
In Norse mythology, Hræsvelgr (Old Norse "Corpse Swallower") is a giant who takes eagle form. According to stanza 37 of the poem Vafþrúðnismál from the Poetic Edda, he sits at the end of the world (or...
Váli (son of Loki)
In Norse mythology, Váli was one of the unlucky sons of Loki. He is mentioned in the Gylfaginning section of Snorri Sturluson's Prose Edda, chapter 50. After the death of Baldr, the Æsir chase down an...