Jain philosophy
Jain philosophy deals with metaphysics, reality, cosmology, ontology, epistemology and divinity. Jainism is a transtheistic religion of ancient India. The distinguishing features of Jain philosophy ar...
Jain philosophy - Wikipedia
Jain cosmology
Jain cosmology is the description of the shape and functioning of the physical and metaphysical Universe (loka) and its constituents (such as living beings, matter, space, time etc.) according to Jain...
Jain cosmology - Wikipedia
Jainism and non-creationism
Jainism does not support belief in a creator deity. According to Jain doctrine, the universe and its constituents—soul, matter, space, time, and principles of motion—have always existed. All the const...
Jainism and non-creationism - Wikipedia
Tattva (Jainism)
Jain metaphysics is based on seven (sometimes nine, with subcategories) truths or fundamental principles also known as tattva or navatattva, which are an attempt to explain the nature and solution t...
Anekantavada
Anekāntavāda (Devanagari: अनेकान्तवाद) is one of the most important and fundamental doctrines of Jainism. It refers to the principles of pluralism and multiplicity of viewpoints, the notion that truth...
Anekantavada - Wikipedia
Ahimsa in Jainism
Ahiṃsā is a fundamental principle forming the cornerstone of its ethics and doctrine in Jainism. The term ahimsa (Sanskrit: अहिंसा, Ahiṃsā) means nonviolence, non-injury or absence of desire to h...
Ahimsa in Jainism - Wikipedia
Mahavrata
Jainism (/ˈdʒeɪnɪzəm/ or /ˈdʒaɪnɪzəm/), traditionally known as Jain Shasan or Jain dharma (Sanskrit: जैन धर्म), is an Indian religion that prescribes a path of ahimsa—nonviolence—towards all livi...
Mahavrata - Wikipedia
Karma in Jainism
Karma is the basic principle within an overarching psycho-cosmology in Jainism. Human moral actions form the basis of the transmigration of the soul (jīva). The soul is constrained to a cycle of rebir...
Karma in Jainism - Wikipedia
Moksa (Jainism)
Moksha (Sanskrit: मोक्ष, leration) or Mokkha (Jain Prakrit: मोक्ख) means liberation, salvation or soul. It is a blissful state of existence of a soul, completely free from the karmic bondage, ...
Kundakunda
Kundakunda (also Kundkund) is a celebrated Jain Acharya, Jain scholar monk, 2nd century CE, composer of spiritual classics such as: Samayasara, Niyamasara, Panchastikayasara, Pravachansara, Atthapahud...
Kundakunda - Wikipedia
Ātman (Jainism)
The Atman (/ˈɑːtmən/; Sanskrit: आत्मन्, IAST: Ātman) is a philosophical term used within Jainism to identify the soul. It is one's true self (hence generally translated into English as 'Self') beyond ...
Adarsana
Adarsana refers to the real non-seeing of objects which already exist; it refers to the ignorance of factual existence of things. This term figures prominently in the Yoga school of thought, and in Ja...
Asrava
Asrava (āsrava "influx") is one of the tattva or the fundamental reality of the world as per the Jain philosophy. It refers to the influence of body and mind causing the soul to generate karma.The kar...
Syādvāda
Anekāntavāda (Devanagari: अनेकान्तवाद) is one of the most important and fundamental doctrines of Jainism. It refers to the principles of pluralism and multiplicity of viewpoints, the notion that truth...
Syādvāda - Wikipedia
Jainism
Jainism (/ˈdʒeɪnɪzəm/ or /ˈdʒaɪnɪzəm/), traditionally known as Jain Shasan or Jain dharma (Sanskrit: जैन धर्म), is an Indian religion that prescribes a path of ahimsa—nonviolence—towards all livi...
Jainism - Wikipedia
Pañca-Parameṣṭhi
The Pañca-Parameṣṭhi (Sanskrit for "five supreme beings") in Jainism are a fivefold hierarchy of religious authorities worthy of veneration.
They are following:The five initials, viz. A+A+A+U+M ...
Types of Karma (Jainism)
According to Jain karma theory, there are eight main types of karma (Prikriti) which are categorized into the ‘harming’ and the ‘non-harming’; each divided into four types. The harming karmas (ghātiyā...
Types of Karma (Jainism) - Wikipedia
Asiddhatva
Asiddhatva is a Sanskrit term which is derived from the word, Asiddha (Sanskrit: असिद्ध्), which means imperfect, incomplete, unaccomplished, unaffected, unproved, not existing or not having taken...
Kevala Jnana
Kevala jnana (Sanskrit: केवलज्ञान, IAST: kevala jñāna) means omniscience in Jainism and is roughly translated as absolute knowledge or supreme knowledge. Kevala jnana is believed to be an intrinsi...
Kevala Jnana - Wikipedia
Pratima (Jainism)
Pratima is a step marking the spiritual rise of a lay person in Jainism.In Jainism, the spiritual rise of a lay householder (sravaka) is marked by eleven steps termed pratima. They are described in se...
Yasovijaya
Yaśovijaya (also known as Yashovijayji with honorifics like Mahopadhyaya or Upadhyaya or Gani), a seventeenth-century (1624–1688) Jain philosopher-monk was one of India’s greatest philosopher and lo...
Aparigraha
Aparigraha (Sanskrit: अपरिग्रहा) is the concept of non-possessiveness, non-grasping or non-greediness. It is one of the virtues in Hinduism and Jainism. Aparigrah is the opposite of parigrah, and refe...
Kayotsarga
Kayotsarga (Sanskrit: कायोत्सर्ग Kāyōtsarga, Jain Prakrit: काउस्सग्ग Kāussagga "relinquishing any bodily activity") is a yogic meditative posture that is also part of the Preksha meditation. M...
Kayotsarga - Wikipedia
Jain meditation
Jain meditation has been the central practice of spirituality in Jainism along with the Three Jewels. Meditation in Jainism aims at realizing the self, attain salvation, take the soul to complete free...
Jain meditation - Wikipedia
Divam
Divam In jain mythology meaning "pure heart".Divam also means spreading sunshine & enlightening lives of people
Moksha (Jainism)
Moksha (Sanskrit: मोक्ष, leration) or Mokkha (Jain Prakrit: मोक्ख) means liberation, salvation or soul. It is a blissful state of existence of a soul, completely free from the karmic bondage, ...