Rangaku
Rangaku (Kyūjitai: 蘭學/Shinjitai: 蘭学, literally "Dutch Learning", and by extension "Western Learning") is a body of knowledge developed by Japan through its contacts with the Dutch enclave of Dejima, w...
Rangaku - Wikipedia
Occupation of Japan
The Allied occupation of Japan at the end of World War II was led by Douglas MacArthur, the Supreme Commander for the Allied Powers, with support from the British Commonwealth. Unlike the occupation o...
Occupation of Japan - Wikipedia
Matsudaira Shigetomi
Matsudaira Shigetomi (松平重富, 25 December 1748–30 July 1808) was a Japanese daimyo of the Edo period. He was head of the Fukui Domain in Echizen Province.
Matsudaira Shigetomi - Wikipedia
Gozen Kaigi
Imperial Conference (御前会議, Gozen Kaigi) (literally the conference before the noble face) was an extraconstitutional conference of matters of grave national importance in foreign affairs that w...
Gozen Kaigi - Wikipedia
Kanrei
Kanrei (管領) or, more rarely, kanryō, was a high political post in feudal Japan; it is usually translated as Shogun's Deputy. After 1349, there were actually two Kanrei, the Kyoto Kanrei and the Kantō ...
Sonnō jōi
Sonnō jōi (尊皇攘夷, Revere the emperor, expel the barbarians) was a Japanese political philosophy and a social movement derived from Neo-Confucianism; it became a political slogan in the 1850s an...
Sonnō jōi - Wikipedia
Udaijin
Udaijin (右大臣, Minister of the Right), was a government position in Japan in the late Nara and Heian periods. The position was consolidated in the Taihō Code of 702. The Asuka Kiyomihara Code o...
Kuge
The kuge (公家) was a Japanese aristocratic class that dominated the Japanese imperial court in Kyoto. The kuge was important from its establishment as the capital in the late 8th century until...
Hakkō ichiu
Hakkō ichiu (八紘一宇, literally "eight crown cords, one roof" i.e. "all the world under 1 roof") was a Japanese political slogan that became popular from the Second Sino-Japanese War to World War II, and...
Hakkō ichiu - Wikipedia
Ashikaga Shigeuji
Ashikaga Shigeuji (足利成氏) (1438?–1497) was a Muromachi period warrior and the Kamakura-fu's fifth and last Kantō Kubō (Shogun Deputy). Fourth son of fourth Kubō Ashikaga Mochiuji, he succeede...
Ashikaga Shigeuji - Wikipedia
Tenpō Reforms
The Tenpō Reforms (天保の改革, tenpō no kaikaku) were an array of economic policies introduced in 1842 by the Tokugawa Shogunate in Japan.These reforms were efforts to resolve perceived problems in...
Mokusatsu
Mokusatsu (黙殺) is a Japanese word meaning "to ignore" or "to treat with silent contempt". It is composed of two kanji: 黙 (moku, literally "silence") and 殺 (satsu, literally "killing"). The governm...
Tozama daimyo
A tozama daimyo (外様大名, tozama-daimyō, ‘outside daimyo’) was a daimyo who was considered an outsider by the rulers of Japan. The term came into use in the Kamakura period and continued until th...
Tozama daimyo - Wikipedia
Tenjiku
Tenjiku (天竺) (meaning "heaven") is the obsolete Japanese word for ancient India, being the Japanese pronunciation of the archaic Chinese name for India, "Tianzhu". It is used in such works as the ...
Kugyō
Kugyō (公卿) is the collective term for the very few most powerful men attached to the court of the Emperor of Japan in pre-Meiji eras. The kugyō was broadly divided into two groups: the Kō (公),...
Kugyō - Wikipedia
Fujiwara no Morozane
Fujiwara no Morozane (Japanese language: 藤原 師実 ふじわらの もろざね) (1042 – March 14, 1101) was a regent of Japan and a chief of the Fujiwara clan during the late Heian period. He was known as Kyōgoku dono (Lo...
Fujiwara no Morozane - Wikipedia
Sakoku
Sakoku (鎖国, "locked country") was the foreign relations policy of Japan under which no foreigner could enter nor could any Japanese leave the country on penalty of death. The policy was enacted b...
Sakoku - Wikipedia
Yi Un
Lieutenant General Prince Imperial Yeong, the Crown Prince Uimin (also Euimin), also known as Yi Un, Yi Eun, Lee Eun, and Un Yi (20 October 1897 – 1 May 1970), was the 28th Head of the Korean Imperia...
Yi Un - Wikipedia
Nabeshima Naohiro
Nabeshima Naohiro (鍋島 直寛, May 8, 1746 – September 12, 1775) was a Japanese daimyo of the mid-Edo period, who ruled the Hasunoike Domain in Hizen Province (modern-day Saga Prefecture).
Nabeshima Naohiro - Wikipedia
Shinbutsu kakuri
The term shinbutsu kakuri (神仏隔離, isolation of "kami" from Buddhism) in Japanese Buddhist terminogy refers to the tendency in medieval and early modern Japan to keep some kami separate from Bud...
Shinbutsu kakuri - Wikipedia
Japanese frigate Kaiyō Maru
Kaiyō Maru (開陽丸) was one of Japan's first modern warships, powered by both sails and steam.
She was ordered in the Netherlands in 1863 by the Bakufu, the government of the Shogun, the Nederlan...
Japanese frigate Kaiyō Maru - Wikipedia
Hidden Christians of Japan
The Japanese term Kirishitan (吉利支丹, 切支丹, キリシタン, きりしたん), from Portuguese cristão, referred to Roman Catholic Christians in Japanese and is used in Japanese texts as a historiographic term for Roman...
Hidden Christians of Japan - Wikipedia
Ashikaga Mochiuji
Ashikaga Mochiuji (足利持氏, 1398-1439) was the Kamakura-fu's fourth Kantō kubō during the Sengoku period (15th century) in Japan. During his long and troubled rule the relationship between the west and t...
Ashikaga Mochiuji - Wikipedia
Honji suijaku
The term honji suijaku or honchi suijaku (本地垂迹) in Japanese religious terminology refers to a theory widely accepted until the Meiji period according to which Indian Buddhist deities choose to app...
Honji suijaku - Wikipedia
Shikken
The Shikken (執権) was the regent for the shogun in the Kamakura shogunate in Japan. The post was monopolized by the Hōjō clan.Hōjō Tokimasa, who was the father-in-law of the first shogun Minamoto n...
Oniwabanshū
The Oniwaban (御庭番, garden guard) or niwaban (庭番) was a group of onmitsu government-employed undercover agents established by the 8th Tokugawa shogun, Tokugawa Yoshimune (1684–1751). They a...