Jewish Christian
Jewish Christians, also Hebrew Christians or Judeo-Christians, were the original members of the Jewish movement that later became Christianity. In the earliest stage the community was made up of all t...
Jewish Christian - Wikipedia
Split of early Christianity and Judaism
The split of early Christianity and Judaism took place during the first centuries of the Common Era. It is commonly attributed to a number of events, including the rejection and crucifixion of Jesus (...
Split of early Christianity and Judaism - Wikipedia
Paul of Tarsus and Judaism
The relationship between Paul the Apostle and Second Temple Judaism continues to be the subject of much scholarly research, as it is thought that Paul played an important role in the relationship betw...
Paul of Tarsus and Judaism - Wikipedia
Circumcision controversy in early Christianity
The Early Christian Council of Jerusalem did not include religious male circumcision as a requirement for new gentile converts. This became known as the "Apostolic Decree" and may be one of the first ...
Circumcision controversy in early Christianity - Wikipedia
New Wine into Old Wineskins
New Wine into Old Wineskins is, according to the New Testament, one of a pair of parables told by Jesus. It is found at Matthew 9:14-17, Mark 2:21-22 and Luke 5:33-39. A version of the parable also ap...
New Wine into Old Wineskins - Wikipedia
Adversus Judaeos
Adversus Judaeos (Greek kata Ioudaious, "against the Jews" or "against the Judeans") are a series of fourth century homilies by John Chrysostom. Steven Katz cites Chrysostom's homilies as “the decisiv...
Jesus in the Talmud
The Talmud contains passages that some scholars have concluded are references to Christian traditions about Jesus. The history of textual transmission of these passages is complex and scholars are not...
Jesus in the Talmud - Wikipedia
Historical background of New Testament
Most scholars who study the Historical Jesus and Early Christianity believe that the Canonical Gospels and life of Jesus must be viewed as firmly placed within his historical and cultural context, ra...
Historical background of New Testament - Wikipedia
James the Just
James (Hebrew: יעקב Ya'akov; Greek Ἰάκωβος Iákōbos, also could be anglicized as Jacob), who died in martyrdom in 62 or 69 AD, was an important figure of the Apostolic Age. His usual epithets are James...
Marcion of Sinope
Marcion of Sinope (/ˈmɑrʃən, -ʃiən, -siən/; Greek: Μαρκίων Σινώπης; c. 85 – c. 160) was an important leader in early Christianity. His theology rejected the deity described in the Hebrew Scriptu...
Marcion of Sinope - Wikipedia
Sanhedrin trial of Jesus
The Sanhedrin trial of Jesus refers to the trial of Jesus before the Sanhedrin (a Jewish judicial body) following his arrest in Jerusalem and prior to his dispensation by Pontius Pilate. It is an even...
Sanhedrin trial of Jesus - Wikipedia
Paul the Apostle and Judaism
The relationship between Paul the Apostle and Second Temple Judaism continues to be the subject of much scholarly research, as it is thought that Paul played an important role in the relationship betw...
Paul the Apostle and Judaism - Wikipedia
Primacy of Simon Peter
Primacy of Simon Peter, also known as Petrine primacy (from the Latin Petrus for "Peter"), is the position of preeminence that is attributed to the Apostle Peter among the Twelve Apostles.It is to be ...
Primacy of Simon Peter - Wikipedia
Persecution of Christians in the New Testament
The persecution of Christians in the New Testament is an important part of the Early Christian narrative which depicts the early Church as being persecuted for their heterodox beliefs by a Jewish esta...
Biblical Sabbath
Biblical Sabbath is a weekly day of rest or time of worship. It is observed differently in Judaism and Christianity and informs a similar occasion in several other faiths. Though many viewpoints and d...
Biblical Sabbath - Wikipedia
Ebionites
Ebionites, or Ebionaioi (Greek: Ἐβιωναῖοι; derived from Hebrew אביונים ebyonim, ebionim, meaning "the poor" or "poor ones"), is a patristic term referring to a Jewish Christian movement that existed ...
Ebionites - Wikipedia
Ebion
Ebion (Greek: Εβιων) was the presumed eponymous founder of an early Christian group known as the Ebionites. The existent historical evidence indicates that the name "Ebionite" is derived from a Hebrew...
Origins of Rabbinic Judaism
Rabbinic Judaism or Rabbinism has been the mainstream form of Judaism since the 6th century, after the codification of the Talmud. Rabbinic Judaism gained predominance within the Jewish diaspora betwe...
Origins of Rabbinic Judaism - Wikipedia
Christianity in the 2nd century
Christianity in the 2nd century was largely the time of the Apostolic Fathers who were the students of the apostles of Jesus, though there is some overlap as John the Apostle may have survived into ...
Christianity in the 2nd century - Wikipedia
Judaism's view of Jesus
Judaism generally views Jesus as one of a number of Jewish Messiah claimants who have appeared throughout history. Jesus is viewed as having been the most influential, and consequently the most damagi...
Legalism (theology)
Legalism, in Christian theology, is a usually pejorative term referring to an over-emphasis on discipline of conduct, or legal ideas, usually implying an allegation of misguided rigour, pride, superf...
Slavonic Josephus
Slavonic Josephus refers to a set of manuscripts that were once attributed to the ancient historian Flavius Josephus, but have since been mostly discredited. Josephus wrote all of his surviving works ...
Slavonic Josephus - Wikipedia
Hellenistic Judaism
Hellenistic Judaism was a form of Judaism in the ancient world that combined Jewish religious tradition with elements of Greek culture. Until the fall of the Roman Empire and the Muslim conquests of t...
Hellenistic Judaism - Wikipedia
Physician, heal thyself
Physician, heal thyself (Ἰατρέ, θεράπευσον σεαυτόν) is a proverb found in Luke 4:23.The usual interpretation of this passage is that, during the Rejection of Jesus, Jesus expected to hear natives of h...
Simeon of Jerusalem
Saint Simeon of Jerusalem, son of Clopas, was a Jewish Christian leader and according to most Christian traditions the second Bishop of Jerusalem (62 or 70–107).
Eusebius of Caesarea gives the lis...
Simeon of Jerusalem - Wikipedia
Judaizers
Judaizers is predominantly a Christian term, derived from the Greek verb ioudaïzō (ἰουδαΐζω "live according to Jewish customs", see Ioudaios). This term is most widely known from its single use in the...
Christianity in the 3rd century
Christianity in the 3rd century was largely the time of the Ante-Nicene Fathers who wrote after the Apostolic Fathers of the 1st and 2nd centuries but before the First Council of Nicaea in 325 (ante-n...
Christianity in the 3rd century - Wikipedia
New Perspective on Paul
The new perspective on Paul is a significant shift in the way some scholars, especially Protestant scholars, interpret the writings of the Apostle Paul.Paul, especially in his Epistle to the Romans, a...
Son of man
"Son of man" is a phrase used in the Hebrew Bible, various apocalyptic works of the inter-testamental period, and the Greek New Testament. In the indefinite form ("son of man", "one like a son of man"...
Son of man - Wikipedia
Baptism in early Christianity
Baptism has been part of Christianity from the start, as shown by the many mentions in the Acts of the Apostles and the Pauline epistles. Christians consider Jesus to have instituted the sacrament of ...
Baptism in early Christianity - Wikipedia
Antisemitism and the New Testament
It has been argued that the New Testament contributed toward subsequent antisemitism in the Christian community. A. Roy Eckardt has asserted that the foundation of antisemitism and responsibility for ...