Jewish religious clothing
Jewish religious clothing has been influenced by Biblical commandments, modesty requirements and the contemporary style of clothing worn in many societies in which the Jews have lived. In Judaism, clo...
Jewish religious clothing - Wikipedia
Chiton (costume)
A chiton (Greek: χιτών, khitōn) was a form of clothing and is a sewn garment, unlike the peplos, a draped garment held on the shoulders by a fibula.There are two forms of chiton, the Doric chiton and...
Chiton (costume) - Wikipedia
Tallit
A tallit [taˈlit] (Hebrew: טַלִּית) (talit in Modern Hebrew, Sephardic Hebrew and Ladino) (tallis, in Ashkenazic Hebrew and Yiddish) pl. tallitot [taliˈtot] (talleisim, tallism, in Ashkenazic Hebrew a...
Tallit - Wikipedia
Tefillin
Tefillin (Askhenazic: /ˈtfɪlɨn/; Israeli Hebrew: [tfiˈlin], תפילין) also called phylacteries (/fɪˈlæktəriːz/ from Ancient Greek φυλακτήριον phylacterion, form of phylássein, φυλάσσειν meaning "to guar...
Tefillin - Wikipedia
Tzitzit
The Hebrew noun tzitzit [tsiˈtsit] (Hebrew: ציצית,  tzitzit,  sˤisˤiṯ) is the name for specially knotted ritual fringes, or tassels, worn in antiquity by Israelites and today by observant Je...
Tzitzit - Wikipedia
Kippah
A kippah, kippa, kipoh, or kipa (/kɪˈpɑː/ ki-PAH; Hebrew: כִּפָּה‎ or כִּיפָּה; plural: kippot כִּפוֹת or כִּיפּוֹת; meaning "dome"), also known as a yarmulke (/ˈjɑrməlkə/ YAR-məl-kə or /ˈjɑːmək...
Kippah - Wikipedia
Kashket
A Kashket (Polish: Kaszkiet; also known as a kashkettel) is a cap, usually made of felt, worn mainly by Hasidic children at present. Prior to the Second World War it was worn by almost all Polish ...
Kashket - Wikipedia
Sudra (headdress)
Sudra (Hebrew and Aramaic: סודרא; Sudara) is a traditional ancient Jewish headdress.
The name Sudra is Aramaic and derived from the Latin word "sudarium", which means cloth or handkerchief.
Temple robes
Temple robes describe the ceremonial clothing worn in the performance of ordinances and ceremonies in a temple.
The 28th and 29th chapters of the Book of Exodus describe in detail the ritual cloth...
Gartel
The Gartel is a belt used by Jewish males, predominantly but not exclusively, Hasidim during prayer. "Gartel" is Yiddish for "belt". The word comes from the same source as German "Gürtel", which is a...
Gartel - Wikipedia
Sheitel
Sheitel (Yiddish: שייטל, sheytl m.sg., שייטלעך, sheytlekh m.pl. or שייטלען, sheytlen m.pl.; Hebrew: פאה נוכרית‎) is the Yiddish word for a wig or half-wig worn by some Orthodox Jewish marri...
Sheitel - Wikipedia
Priestly golden head plate
The priestly crown or frontlet (tziytz צִיץ) was the golden plate or tiara worn by the Jewish High Priest on his mitre or turban whenever he would minister in the Tabernacle or the Temple in Jerusale...
White clothing (religious)
White clothing has significance in many religious faith traditions. Some of these traditions include:
Maro deives
Priestly turban
The priestly mitre or turban (Hebrew mitznefet מִצְנֶפֶת) was the head covering worn by the Jewish High Priest when he served in the Tabernacle and the Temple in Jerusalem.
The Hebrew word mitznef...
Priestly turban - Wikipedia
Tichel
The tichel (Yiddish טיכל tikhl), also called a mitpachat (Hebrew מִטפַּחַת miṭpaḥat), is a headscarf worn by many married Orthodox Jewish women in compliance with the code of modesty known as tzniut. ...
Tichel - Wikipedia
Kittel
A kittel, also spelled kitl, (Yiddish: קיטל, robe, coat, cf. German Kittel ‘[house/work] coat’) is a white robe which serves as a burial shroud for male Jews. It is also worn on special occasions ...
Kittel - Wikipedia
Jewish hat
The Jewish hat also known as the Jewish cap, Judenhut (German) or Latin pilleus cornutus ("horned skullcap"), was a cone-shaped pointed hat, often white or yellow, worn by Jews in Medieval Europe and ...
Jewish hat - Wikipedia
Shtreimel
A shtreimel (Yiddish: שטרײַמל, pl. שטרײַמלעך shtreimlech) is a fur hat worn by many married haredi Jewish men, particularly (although not exclusively) members of Hasidic groups, on Shabbat and Jew...
Shtreimel - Wikipedia
Priestly tunic
The priestly tunic (Hebrew ketonet כֻּתֹּנֶת) was as an undergarment or shirt worn by the High Priest and priests when they served in the Tabernacle and the Temple in Jerusalem.
The Hebrew noun ke...
Urim and Thummim (Latter Day Saints)
In the Latter Day Saint movement, the Urim and Thummim (/ˈjuːr.ɪm/ and /ˈθʌm.ɪm/) (also called Interpreters) usually refers to a set of seer stones bound by silver bows into a set of spectacles, that ...
Urim and Thummim (Latter Day Saints) - Wikipedia
Tekhelet
Tekhelet (Hebrew: תכלת‎, "turquoise" or "blue"; alternate spellings include tekelet, t'chelet, techelet and techeiles) is a blue dye mentioned 49 times in the Hebrew Bible/Tanakh. It was used ...
Tekhelet - Wikipedia
Priestly undergarments
The priestly undergarments (Biblical Hebrew: מִכְנְסֵי־בָד miḵnəsē-ḇāḏ) were "linen breeches" (KJV) worn by the priests and the High Priest in ancient Israel. They reached from the waist to the k...
Priestly sash

The priestly sash or girdle (Hebrew avnet אַבְנֵט) was part of the ritual garments worn by the Jewish and priests of ancient Israel whenever they served in the Tabernacle or the Temple in Jerusa...
Atarah
'Atara is a Hebrew word meaning "crown." As an article of clothing, it is referenced in the following verses of the Hebrew Bible.Crowns also serve as a metaphor in the following references:
The w...
Kasaya (clothing)
Kāṣāya (Sanskrit: काषाय kāṣāya; Pali: kasāva; Chinese: 袈裟; pinyin: jiāshā; Cantonese Jyutping: gaasaa ; Japanese: 袈裟 kesa; Korean: 袈裟 가사 gasa; Vietnam...
Kasaya (clothing) - Wikipedia
Bekishe
A bekishe, or beketshe (Yiddish: בעקעטשע), is a long coat, usually made of black silk or polyester worn by Hasidic Jews, and by some non-Hasidic Haredi Jews. The bekishe is worn mainly on Shabbos...
Bekishe - Wikipedia
Spodik
A spodik (or spodek) is a tall fur hat worn by some Hasidic Jews, particularly members of sects originating in Congress Poland.
Spodiks are to be distinguished from shtreimels, which are a similar...
Kolpik
A kolpik is a type of traditional headgear worn in families of some Chassidic rebbes (Hasidic rabbis), by unmarried children on Shabbat, and by some rebbes on some special occasions other than Shabbat...
Kolpik - Wikipedia