Kofun period
The Kofun period (古墳時代, Kofun jidai) is an era in the history of Japan from around 250 to 538. It follows the Yayoi period. The word kofun is Japanese for the type of burial mounds dating from...
Kofun period - Wikipedia
"Tsundoku," the Japanese Word for the New Books That Pile Up on Our Shelves, Should Enter the English Language
There are some words out there that are brilliantly evocative and at the same time impossible to fully translate. Yiddish has the word shlimazl, which basically means a perpetually unlucky person. G...
Kofun
Kofun (古墳, from Sino-Japanese "ancient grave") are megalithic tombs or tumuli in Japan, constructed between the early 3rd century and the early 7th century AD. They gave their name to the Kofun period...
Kofun - Wikipedia
Kuni no miyatsuko
Kuni no miyatsuko (国造), also read as "kokuzō" or "'kuni tsu ko", were officials in ancient Japan at the time of the Yamato court.
Kuni no miyatsuko governed small territories (kuni (国)), a...
Emperor Buretsu
Emperor Buretsu (武烈天皇, Buretsu-tennō) was the 25th emperor of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession.No firm dates can be assigned to this emperor's life or reign, but he is c...
"Tsundoku," the Japanese Word for the New Books That Pile Up on Our Shelves, Should Enter the English Language
There are some words out there that are brilliantly evocative and at the same time impossible to fully translate. Yiddish has the word shlimazl, which basically means a perpetually unlucky person. G...
Uji (clan)
Uji (氏) are Japanese kin groups of the Kofun period. Uji were similar to the traditional Japanese clans; however, the pre-Taika uji did not have many of the characteristics which are commonly und...
Sue ware
Sue ware (須恵器, sueki, literally offering ware) was a blue-gray form of high-fired pottery which was produced in Japan and southern Korea during the Kofun, Nara, and Heian periods of Japanese ...
Sue ware - Wikipedia
Mukibanda Yayoi remains
Mukibanda Yayoi remains (妻木晩田遺跡, Mukibanda-iseki) are the largest Yayoi period remains in Japan. The Mukibanda site is located in the low foothills of Mount Daisen in the cities of Daisen and ...
Mukibanda Yayoi remains - Wikipedia
Chichibu Province
Chichibu Province (知々夫国, Chichibu no kuni) was an old province of Japan in the area that is today the western part of Saitama Prefecture.
According to text in the Sendai Kuji Hongi (Kujik...
Emperor Ingyō
Emperor Ingyō (允恭天皇, Ingyō-tennō) was the 19th emperor of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession.No firm dates can be assigned to this emperor's life or reign, but he is conve...
Mononobe no Arakabi
Mononobe no Arakabi (物部 麁鹿火, died 536) was a government minister during the Kofun period of ancient Japanese history.In 512, the king of the Korean kingdom of Baekje (called Kudara by the Japanese...
Mononobe no Arakabi - Wikipedia
Bushido
Bushidō (武士道), literally "the way of the warrior", is a Japanese word for the way of the samurai life, loosely analogous to the concept of chivalry.Bushido, a modern term rather than a historical ...
Bushido - Wikipedia
Magatama
Magatama (勾玉), less frequently (曲玉), are curved, comma-shaped beads that appeared in prehistoric Japan from the Final Jōmon period through the Kofun period, approximately ca. 1,000 BC to the 6th c...
Magatama - Wikipedia
Emperor Keitai
Emperor Keitai (継体天皇, Keitai-tennō), also known as Keitai-okimi, was the 26th emperor of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession.No firm dates can be assigned to this emperor's...
Emperor Keitai - Wikipedia
Fusang
Fusang (Chinese: 扶桑) refers to several different entities in ancient Chinese literature, often either a mythological tree or a mysterious land to the East. In the Classic of Mountains and Seas, a...
Fusang - Wikipedia
Princess Iwa
Princess Iwa (磐之媛命, Iwa no hime mikoto), sometimes known as Empress Iwa no hime (磐姫皇后, Iwa no hime kōgō), was a poet and the Empress consort of Emperor Nintoku, who was the 16th empero...
Shinju-kyo
Japanese Shinjūkyō (神獣鏡, "deity and beast mirror") is an ancient type of round bronze mirror decorated with images of gods and animals from Chinese mythology. The obverse side has a polished mirro...
Shinju-kyo - Wikipedia
Military history of Japan
The military history of Japan is characterized by a long period of clan warfare until the 12th century AD, followed by feudal wars which sometimes culminated in a military government called a shogunat...
Military history of Japan - Wikipedia
Soga no Koma
Soga no Koma (蘇我 高麗) was a member of the Soga clan, and Chief Minister of Japan (ōomi).He was the father of the powerful Soga no Iname (born approximately 506 AD), whose direct descendants control...
Prince Kinashi no Karu
Prince Kinashi no Karu (木梨軽皇子, Kinashi no Karu no Miko, died circa 453) was a Japanese prince. He was a son of Emperor Ingyō.Prince Kinashi no Karu, Princess Karu no Ōiratsume, Prince Anaho (E...
Yamato period
The Yamato period (大和時代, Yamato-jidai) is the period of Japanese history when the Japanese Imperial court ruled from modern-day Nara Prefecture, then known as Yamato Province.While conventiona...
Yamato period - Wikipedia
Omi
Omi (臣) was an ancient Japanese hereditary title denoting rank and political standing (a kabane) that, along with muraji, was reserved for the most powerful clans during the Kofun period. The omi ...
Haniwa
The Haniwa (埴輪) are terracotta clay figures which were made for ritual use and buried with the dead as funerary objects during the Kofun period (3rd to 6th centuries AD) of the history of Japan. H...
Haniwa - Wikipedia
Emperor Ankō
Emperor Ankō (安康天皇, Ankō-tennō) was the 20th emperor of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession.No firm dates can be assigned to this emperor's life or reign, but he is convent...
Emperor Ankō - Wikipedia