Late ancient Christianity
The History of Late Ancient Christianity traces Christianity during the Christian Roman Empire - the period from the rise of Christianity under Emperor Constantine (c. 313), until the fall of the West...
Arianism
Arianism is the nontrinitarian, heterodoxical teaching, first attributed to Arius (c. AD 250–336), a Christian presbyter in Alexandria, Egypt, concerning the relationship of God the Father to the Son ...
Arianism - Wikipedia
Constantine the Great and Christianity
While the Roman Emperor Constantine the Great (reigned 306–337) ruled, Christianity began to transition to the dominant religion of the Roman Empire. Historians remain uncertain about Constantine's re...
Constantine the Great and Christianity - Wikipedia
Decretum Gelasianum
The so-called Decretum Gelasianum or the Gelasian Decree was traditionally attributed to the prolific Pope Gelasius I, bishop of Rome 492–496. In surviving manuscripts the Decretal exists on its own ...
Eastern Christianity
Eastern Christianity consists of four main church families: the Eastern Orthodox Church, the Oriental Orthodox Churches, the Assyrian Church of the East and the Eastern Catholic Churches. The term is ...
Eastern Christianity - Wikipedia
Hellenistic philosophy and Christianity
Hellenistic philosophy and Christianity refers to the complex interaction between Hellenistic philosophy and early Christianity during the first to fourth centuries.The conflict between the two modes ...
Imperial church
An imperial church is a church associated with an empire.The first such church was the state church of the Roman Empire, as patronized and largely controlled by the Roman Emperors from the time of the...
Council of Philippopolis
The Council of Philippopolis in 343, 344, or 347 was a result of Arian bishops from the Eastern Roman Empire leaving the Council of Sardica to form their own counter council. In Philippopolis, they an...
Auxentius of Durostorum
Auxentius of Durostorum a.k.a. Mercurinus was the foster-son of Ulfilas (Wulfila), the "apostle to the Goths". Auxentius was a deacon in Alexandria and a follower of the Arian bishop Auxentius of Mila...
Christianity in the 4th century
Christianity in the 4th century was dominated in its early stage by Constantine the Great and the First Council of Nicaea of 325, which was the beginning of the period of the First seven Ecumenical C...
Christianity in the 4th century - Wikipedia
Artemius
Artemius (d. in Antioch, 362), known as Challita in the Maronite tradition, was a general of the Roman Empire, dux Aegypti (imperial prefect of Roman Egypt). He is considered a saint by the Orthodox C...
Artemius - Wikipedia
History of Eastern Christianity
Christianity has been, historically a Middle Eastern religion with its origin in Hebrew tribal Judaism. Eastern Christianity refers collectively to the Christian traditions and churches which develope...
Christian monasticism
Christian monasticism is the devotional practice of individuals who live ascetic and typically cloistered lives that are dedicated to Christian worship. It began to develop early in the history of the...
Christian monasticism - Wikipedia
Constantinianism
Constantinianism refers to those policies said to be enacted, encouraged, or personally favored by Constantine the Great, a 4th-century Roman Emperor. In particular, it may refer to any of the followi...
Constantinianism - Wikipedia
Lucian of Antioch
Saint Lucian of Antioch (c. 240 – January 7, 312), known as Lucian the Martyr, was a Christian presbyter, theologian and martyr. He was noted for both his scholarship and ascetic piety.
According ...
Lucian of Antioch - Wikipedia
Bawit
Bawit (French: Baouît) is an archaeological site located 80 kilometres (50 mi) north of Asyut, near the village of Dashlout, in Egypt. It covers an area of 40 hectares (99 acres), and houses a ce...
Bawit - Wikipedia
Christianity in the 5th century
In the 5th century in Christianity, there were many developments which led to further fracturing of the State church of the Roman Empire. Emperor Theodosius II called two synods in Ephesus, one ...
Christianity in the 5th century - Wikipedia
Photinus
Photinus (Greek Φωτεινός; died 376), was a Christian heresiarch and bishop of Sirmium in Pannonia (today the town Sremska Mitrovica in Serbia), best known for denying the incarnation of Christ. His n...
Photinus - Wikipedia
Patrick Pakingham
Patrick Pakenham (Packingham, Pakingham) was an English fellmonger who was burned to death at Uxbridge in August 1555 because he refused to recant his Arian beliefs. He is mentioned in John Foxe's Act...