Late ancient history of Christianity
The History of Late Ancient Christianity traces Christianity during the Christian Roman Empire - the period from the rise of Christianity under Emperor Constantine (c. 313), until the fall of the Roma...
Late ancient history of Christianity - Wikipedia
History of the Papacy
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History of early Christianity
The history of early Christianity covers Christianity from its origins to the First Council of Nicaea in 325.The first part of the period, during the lifetimes of the Twelve Apostles, is traditionally...
History of early Christianity - Wikipedia
History of medieval Christianity
The history of Christianity during the Middle Ages is the history of Christianity between the Fall of Rome (c. 476) and the onset of the Protestant Reformation during the early 16th century, the...
History of medieval Christianity - Wikipedia
Constantine I and Christianity
While the Roman Emperor Constantine the Great (reigned 306–337) ruled, Christianity began to transition to the dominant religion of the Roman Empire. Historians remain uncertain about Constantine's re...
Constantine I and Christianity - Wikipedia
Christology
Christology (from Greek Χριστός Khristós and -λογία, -logia) is the field of study within Christian theology which is primarily concerned with the nature and person of Jesus as recorded in the canonic...
Christology - Wikipedia
First seven Ecumenical Councils
In the history of Christianity, the first seven ecumenical councils, from the First Council of Nicaea (325) to the Second Council of Nicaea (787), represented an attempt to reach an orthodox consensus...
First seven Ecumenical Councils - Wikipedia
First Council of Nicaea
The First Council of Nicaea (/naɪˈsiːə/; Greek: Νίκαια [ˈni:kaɪja]) was a council of Christian bishops convened in Nicaea in Bithynia by the Roman Emperor Constantine I in AD 325. This first ecum...
First Council of Nicaea - Wikipedia
First Council of Constantinople
The First Council of Constantinople (Greek: Κωνσταντινούπολις Konstantinoúpolis) was a council of Christian bishops convened in Constantinople (present-day Istanbul in Turkey) in AD 381 by the Rom...
First Council of Constantinople - Wikipedia
First Council of Ephesus
The Council of Ephesus was a council of Christian bishops convened in Ephesus (near present-day Selçuk in Turkey) in AD 431 by the Roman Emperor Theodosius II. This third ecumenical council, an effor...
First Council of Ephesus - Wikipedia
Council of Chalcedon
The Council of Chalcedon (/kælˈsiːdən/ or /ˈkælsɨdɒn/) was a church council held from October 8 to November 1, AD 451, at Chalcedon (a city of Bithynia in Asia Minor), on the Asian side of the Bosporu...
Biblical canon (Christian)
The Christian biblical canons are the books Christians regard as divinely inspired and constituting a Christian Bible. Books included in the Christian biblical canons of both the Old and New Testament...
State church of the Roman Empire
Nicene Christianity became the state church of the Roman Empire with the Edict of Thessalonica in AD 380, when Emperor Theodosius I made it the Empire's sole authorized religion. The Eastern Orthodox ...
State church of the Roman Empire - Wikipedia
History of the Papacy
The history of the papacy, the office held by the pope as head of the Catholic Church, spans from the time of Saint Peter to present day.During the Early Church, the bishops of Rome enjoyed no tempora...
History of the Papacy - Wikipedia
Christianity in Iran
Christianity has a long history in Iran, dating back to the early years of the faith. It has been practiced in Iran longer than the state religion, Islam. It has always been a minority religion, with ...
Christianity in Iran - Wikipedia
Gothic Christianity
Gothic Christianity refers to the Christian religion of the Goths and sometimes the Gepids, Vandals, and Burgundians, who may have used Wulfila's translation of the Bible into Gothic and shared common...
Gothic Christianity - Wikipedia
Christian monasticism
Christian monasticism is the devotional practice of individuals who live ascetic and typically cloistered lives that are dedicated to Christian worship. It began to develop early in the history of the...
Christian monasticism - Wikipedia
Porzia de' Medici
Porzia de' Medici (1538–1565) was an Italian missionary and illegitimate daughter of Alessandro de' Medici, Duke of Florence and an unknown mother. She was born after the assassination of Alessandro a...
Porzia de' Medici - Wikipedia
Hermann von Vicari
Hermann von Vicari (b. at Aulendorf in Württemberg, 13 May 1773; d. at Freiburg, 14 April 1868) was a German Catholic churchman, who became Archbishop of Freiburg, in Baden.
In 1789 he received to...
Hermann von Vicari - Wikipedia
Joseph Ratzinger as Prefect of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith
Joseph Ratzinger was named by Pope John Paul II on 25 November 1981 Cardinal-Prefect of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, formerly known as the Holy Office and, especially around the ...
Antipope Benedict XIV

Benedict XIV was the name used by two closely related minor antipopes of the 15th century. The first, Bernard Garnier became antipope in 1424 and died ca. 1429. The second, Jean Carrier, became a...
Antipope Benedict XIV - Wikipedia
Villa del Poggio Imperiale
Villa del Poggio Imperiale (English: Villa of the Imperial Hill) is a predominantly neoclassical former grand ducal villa in Arcetri, just to the south of Florence in Tuscany, central Italy. Beginnin...
Villa del Poggio Imperiale - Wikipedia
Pope Leo III
Pope Leo III (750 – 12 June 816) was Pope from 795 to his death in 816. Protected by Charlemagne from his enemies in Rome, he subsequently strengthened Charlemagne's position by crowning him Roman Emp...
Pope Leo III - Wikipedia
Papal conclave, January 1276
Papal conclave, January 1276 (January 21–22), was the first papal election held under the rules of constitution Ubi periculum issued by Pope Gregory X in 1274, which established papal conclaves. Accor...
Papal conclave, January 1276 - Wikipedia
Paradiso (Dante)
Paradiso (Italian for "Paradise" or "Heaven") is the third and final part of Dante's Divine Comedy, following the Inferno and the Purgatorio. It is an allegory telling of Dante's journey through Heav...
Paradiso (Dante) - Wikipedia
March of Ancona
The March of Ancona or marca Anconitana (also Anconetana) was a frontier march centred on the city of Ancona and, then, Macerata in the Middle Ages. Its name is preserved as an Italian region today, ...
March of Ancona - Wikipedia
Jean du Cros
Jean de Murat du Cros was a French cardinal of the Catholic Church. He became the Bishop of Limoges (1347–1371). He was a leader in what became the Great Schism within Western Christianity.He was born...
Pascalina Lehnert
Madre (Mother) Pascalina Lehnert (25 August 1894, Ebersberg, Kingdom of Bavaria, German Empire – 13 November 1983, Vienna, Austria), born Josefina Lehnert, was a German Roman Catholic nun w...
Pascalina Lehnert - Wikipedia
Pope Eugene I
Pope Eugene I (died 1 June 657), also known as Eugenius I, was Pope from 10 August 654 to his death in 657. He was a native of Rome, born to one Rufinianus.
Little is known of Pope Eugene's early ...
Pope Eugene I - Wikipedia
Antipope Honorius II
Honorius II (died 1072), born Pietro Cadalus, was an antipope from 1061 to 1072. He was born at Verona and became bishop of Parma in 1046. He died at Parma in 1072.After the death of Pope Nicholas II ...
Antipope Honorius II - Wikipedia