Argumentum ad lapidem
Argumentum ad lapidem (Latin: "to the stone") is a logical fallacy that consists in dismissing a statement as absurd without giving proof of its absurdity. The form of argument employed by such dismis...
Argumentum ad lapidem - Wikipedia
Causa sui
Causa sui ([kawsa sʊi], meaning "cause of itself" in Latin) denotes something which is generated within itself. This concept was central to the works of Baruch Spinoza, Sigmund Freud, Jean-Paul Sartre...
Pertransit benefaciendo
Pertransit benefaciendo is a Latin phrase which means "He went about doing good".It is applied about one who has died, to show that they have done good in their life. It originates from the words of S...
Pertransit benefaciendo - Wikipedia
Eo ipso
Eo ipso means "by (or from) the thing itself" in Latin and is similar to the sense expressed by the English idioms, "by the same token," "of itself" or "on its own account". It is often used in variou...
Theory of impetus
The theory of impetus was an auxiliary or secondary theory of Aristotelian dynamics, put forth initially to explain projectile motion against gravity. It was introduced by John Philoponus in the 6th c...
Theory of impetus - Wikipedia
Ab ovo
Ab ovo (Latin: "from the beginning, the origin, the egg") is a reference to one of the twin eggs from which Helen of Troy was born. The eggs were laid by Leda after mating with Zeus disguised as a swa...
Ab ovo - Wikipedia
Bellum omnium contra omnes
Bellum omnium contra omnes, a Latin phrase meaning "the war of all against all", is the description that Thomas Hobbes gives to human existence in the state of nature thought experiment that he conduc...
Tempora mutantur
Tempora mutantur is a Latin adage meaning "times change". It is also stated in various longer hexametric forms, most commonly Tempora mutantur, nos et mutamur in illis, meaning "Times change, and we c...
Tempora mutantur - Wikipedia
Docendo discimus
Docendo discimus, (Latin "by teaching, we learn"). Seneca the Younger (c. 4 BC – 65 AD) says in his letters to Lucilius Junior that we are learning if we teach (epistulae morales I, 7, 8). Docen...
Hypotheses non fingo
Hypotheses non fingo (Latin for "I feign no hypotheses," "I frame no hypotheses," or "I contrive no hypotheses") is a famous phrase used by Isaac Newton in an essay, General Scholium, which was append...
Conatus
In early philosophies of psychology and metaphysics, conatus (/koʊˈneɪtəs/; Latin for "effort; endeavor; impulse, inclination, tendency; undertaking; striving") is an innate inclination of a thing to ...
Conatus - Wikipedia
Sensus divinitatis
Sensus divinitatis ("sense of divinity"), also referred to as sensus deitatis ("sense of deity") or semen religionis ("seed of religion"), is a term first used by French Protestant reformer John Calvi...
Sensus divinitatis - Wikipedia
Contra vim mortis non crescit herba in hortis
Contra vim mortis non crescit herba in hortis (or Contra vim mortis non crescit salvia in hortis, Latin: "No herb grows in the gardens against the power of death", "No sage grows in the gardens agains...
Festina lente
Festina lente or σπεῦδε βραδέως (speûde bradéōs) is a classical adage and oxymoron meaning "make haste slowly" (sometimes rendered in English as "more haste, less speed"). It has been adopted as a m...
Festina lente - Wikipedia
Prima facie
Prima facie (/ˈpraɪmə ˈfeɪʃɨ.iː/, /ˈfeɪʃə/, or /ˈfeɪʃiː/; from Latin: prīmā faciē) is a Latin expression meaning on its first encounter or at first sight. The literal translation would be "at firs...
A priori and a posteriori
The terms a priori ("from the earlier") and a posteriori ("from the later") are used in philosophy (epistemology) to distinguish two types of knowledge, justification, or argument:There are many point...
Primum movens
The unmoved mover (Ancient Greek: ὃ οὐ κινούμενον κινεῖ, ho ou kinoúmenon kineî, "that which moves without being moved") or prime mover (Latin: primum movens) is a monotheistic concept advanc...
Natura non facit saltus
Natura non facit saltum (Latin for "nature does not make a jump") has been a principle of natural philosophy since at least Aristotle's time. It appears as an axiom in the works of Gottfried Leibniz (...
Reductio ad absurdum
Reductio ad absurdum (Latin: "reduction to absurdity"; pl.: reductiones ad absurdum), also known as argumentum ad absurdum (Latin: argument to absurdity), is a common form of argument which seeks to d...
Castigat ridendo mores
Castigat ridendo mores ([kaˈstiːɡat rɪˈdɛndoː ˈmoːreːs]) (laughing corrects morals) is a Latin phrase that generally means "one corrects customs by laughing at them," or "he corrects morals by ridicul...
Nullius in verba
Nullius in verba (Latin for "on the word of no one" or "Take nobody's word for it") is the motto of the Royal Society. John Evelyn and other Royal Society fellows chose the motto soon after the foundi...
Homo reciprocans
Homo reciprocans, or reciprocal human, is the concept in some economic theories of humans as cooperative actors who are motivated by improving their environment. This concept stands in contrast to the...
Ad nauseam
Ad nauseam is a Latin term for a discussion that has continued so long that it has continued "to [the point of] nausea". For example, the sentence "This topic has been discussed ad nauseam" signifies ...
Q.E.D.
Q.E.D. is an initialism of the Latin phrase quod erat demonstrandum, originating from the Ancient Greek analogous hóper édei deîxai (ὅπερ ἔδει δεῖξαι), meaning "which had to be proven". The phrase is ...
Q.E.D. - Wikipedia
De se
De se is Latin for "of oneself" and, in philosophy, it is a phrase used to mark off what some believe to be a category of ascription distinct from "de dicto and de re".Jonathan Kvanvig draws the disti...
Suum cuique
"Suum cuique" ([ˈsu.um ˈkuj.kʷe]) is a Latin phrase meaning "to each his own", ("his" in a gender-neutral sense) i.e. "may all get their due". It has been significant in the history of philosophy and...
Suum cuique - Wikipedia
Anima mundi
The world soul (Greek: ψυχὴ κόσμου, Latin: anima mundi) is, according to several systems of thought, an intrinsic connection between all living things on the planet, which relates to our world in much...
Ipso facto
Ipso facto is a Latin phrase, directly translated as "by the fact itself," which means that a certain phenomenon is a direct consequence, a resultant effect, of the action in question, instead of bein...