De mortuis nil nisi bonum
The Latin phrases De mortuis nihil nisi bonum (“Of the dead, nothing unless good.”) and De mortuis nil nisi bene [dicendum] (“Of the dead, nothing [spoken] unless good.”) indicate that it is socially ...
De mortuis nil nisi bonum - Wikipedia
Et tu, Brute?
"Et tu, Brute?" ([ɛt ˈtuː ˈbruːtɛ]) is a Latin phrase meaning "and you, Brutus?" or "and you, too, Brutus?", purportedly as the last words of the Roman dictator Julius Caesar to his friend Marcus Brut...
Et tu, Brute? - Wikipedia
Fiat justitia ruat caelum
Fiat justitia ruat caelum is a Latin legal phrase, meaning "Let justice be done though the heavens fall." The maxim signifies the belief that justice must be realized regardless of consequences. Acco...
Fiat justitia ruat caelum - Wikipedia
Fiat justitia
Fiat justitia is a Latin phrase, meaning “Let justice be done". Historically in England, a warrant for a writ of error in Parliament or later a petition of right in the courts could be brought only af...
Fiat justitia - Wikipedia
Vi veri universum vivus vici
Vi veri universum vivus vici (also written as "Vi veri veniversum vivus vici") is a Latin phrase meaning: "By the power of truth, I, while living, have conquered the universe", or, "By the power of tr...
Cogito ergo sum
Cogito ergo sum (/ˈkoʊɡɨtoʊ ˈɜrɡoʊ ˈsʊm//ˈkɒɡɨtoʊ/, /ˈsʌm/; Classical Latin: [ˈkoːɡitoː ˈɛrɡoː ˈsʊm], "I think, therefore I am", or better "I am thinking, therefore I exist") is a philosophical propo...
Annus horribilis
Annus horribilis is a Latin phrase, meaning “horrible year”. It is complementary to annus mirabilis, which means “wonderful year”; however, annus mirabilis is a traditional term, while annus horribili...
Carthago delenda est
"Ceterum censeo Carthaginem esse delendam" or "Ceterum autem censeo Carthaginem esse delendam" (English: "Furthermore, (moreover) I consider that Carthage must be destroyed") often abbreviated to "Cet...
Carthago delenda est - Wikipedia
Alea iacta est
Alea iacta est ("The die is cast") is a Latin phrase attributed by Suetonius (as iacta alea est [ˈjakta ˈaːlea est]) to Julius Caesar on January 10, 49 BC as he led his army across the River Rubicon i...
Amicus Plato, sed magis amica veritas
Amicus Plato, sed magis amica veritas is a Latin phrase, translating to "Plato is my friend, but truth is a better friend (literally: Plato is friend, but truth is more friend (to me than he is))." T...