Law of Canada
The Canadian legal system has its foundation in the English common law system with some influence from Scots Law, inherited from being a former colony of the United Kingdom and later a Commonwealth Re...
Law of Canada - Wikipedia
Constitution of Canada
The Constitution of Canada is the supreme law in Canada; the country's constitution is an amalgamation of codified acts and uncodified traditions and conventions. It is one of the oldest working con...
Law in Quebec
Quebec law is unique in Canada because Quebec is the only province in Canada to have a juridical legal system (pertaining to the administration of justice) under which civil matters are regulated by F...
Canadian Aboriginal law
Canadian Aboriginal law is the body of Canadian law that concerns a variety of issues related to aboriginal peoples in Canada. Aboriginal law provides certain rights to land and traditional practices....
Canadian administrative law
Canadian administrative law is the body of law that addresses the actions and operations of governments and governmental agencies. That is, the law concerns the manner in which courts can review the d...
Civil rights law in Canada
Since signing the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in 1948, the Canadian government has attempted to make universal human rights a part of Canadian law. There are currently four key mechanisms in...
Civil rights law in Canada - Wikipedia
Canadian contract law
Canadian contract law has its foundation in the English legal tradition of the 19th and early 20th century. It remains largely rooted in the old English common law and equity. Individual provinces hav...
Canadian constitutional law
Canadian constitutional law is the area of Canadian law relating to the interpretation and application of the Constitution of Canada by the Courts. All laws of Canada, both provincial and federal, mus...
Canadian constitutional law - Wikipedia
Canadian copyright law
The copyright law of Canada governs the legally enforceable rights to creative and artistic works under the laws of Canada. Canada passed its first colonial copyright statute in 1832 but was subject t...
Criminal law in Canada
The criminal law of Canada is under the exclusive legislative jurisdiction of the federal government, unlike in Australia or the US (see also federal crime). The power to enact criminal law is derived...
Canadian family law
Family Law in Canada concerns the body of Canadian law dealing with family relationship, marriage, and divorce.
In Canada, family law is primarily statute-based. The exclusive jurisdiction of the ...
Canadian immigration and refugee law
Canadian immigration and refugee law concerns the area of law related to the admission of foreign nationals into Canada, their rights and responsibilities once admitted, and the conditions of their re...
Inheritance law in Canada
Inheritance law in Canada is constitutionally a provincial matter. Therefore, the laws governing inheritance in Canada is legislated by each individual province.
Where a person dies intestate, th...
Canadian labour and employment law
Canadian labour law is that body of law which regulates the rights, restrictions obligations of trade unions, workers and employers in Canada. Canadian employment law is that body of law which regulat...
Canadian patent law
Canadian patent law is the legal system regulating the granting of patents for inventions within Canada, and the enforcement of these rights in Canada.
A patent is a government grant that gives th...
Canadian property law
Property law in Canada is the body of law concerning the rights of individuals over land, objects, and expression within Canada. It encompasses personal property, real property, and intellectual prope...
Tort law in Canada
Tort law in Canada concerns the treatment of the law of torts within the Canadian jurisdiction excluding Quebec, which is covered by the law of obligations. A tort consists of a wrongful acts or injur...
Canadian trade-mark law
Canadian trademark law provides protection to marks by statute under the Trade-marks Act and also at common law. Trademark law provides protection for distinctive marks, certification marks, distingui...
Court system of Canada
The court system of Canada is made up of many courts differing in levels of legal superiority and separated by jurisdiction. Some of the courts are federal in nature while others are provincial or te...
Court system of Canada - Wikipedia
Negligence
Negligence (Lat. negligentia, from neglegere, to neglect, literally "not to pick up something") is a failure to exercise the care that a reasonably prudent person would exercise in like circumstances....
Negligence - Wikipedia
First Nations
The First Nations are the various Aboriginal peoples in Canada who are neither Inuit nor Métis. There are currently over 630 recognized First Nations governments or bands spread across Canada, roughly...
First Nations - Wikipedia
Patent
A patent (/ˈpætənt/ or /ˈpeɪtənt/) is a set of exclusive rights granted by a sovereign state to an inventor or assignee for a limited period of time in exchange for detailed public disclosure of an in...
Patent - Wikipedia
High Arctic relocation
The High Arctic relocation (French: La délocalisation du Haut-Arctique, Inuktitut: ᖁᑦᑎᒃᑐᒥᐅᑦᑕ ᓅᑕᐅᓂᖏᑦ Quttiktumut nuutauningit) took place during the Cold War in the 1950s, when 87 Inuit were moved by t...
High Arctic relocation - Wikipedia
PROFUNC
PROFUNC (1950–1983), which stands for "PROminent FUNCtionaries of the communist party", was a Government of Canada top secret plan to identify and intern Canadian communists and crypto-communists duri...
PROFUNC - Wikipedia
Passing off in Canadian intellectual property law
In Canada, passing off is both a common law tort and a statutory cause of action under the Canadian Trade-marks Act referring to the deceptive representation or marketing of goods or services by compe...
Patent infringement in Canadian law
Once an invention is patented in Canada, exclusive rights are granted to the patent holder as defined by s.42 of the Patent Act (R.S.C., 1985, c. P-4). Any interference with the patent holder's "full ...
Subject matter in patent law in Canada
In Canadian patent law, only “inventions” are patentable. Under the Patent Act, only certain categories of things may be considered and defined as inventions. Therefore, if a patent discloses an item ...
Novelty and non-obviousness in Canadian patent law
For a patent to be valid in Canada, the invention claimed therein needs to be new and inventive. In patent law, these requirements are known as novelty and non-obviousness. A patent cannot in theory b...
Novelty and non-obviousness in Canadian patent law - Wikipedia
Canadian law
The Canadian legal system has its foundation in the English common law system with some influence from Scots Law, inherited from being a former colony of the United Kingdom and later a Commonwealth Re...
Canadian law - Wikipedia
Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms
The Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms (French: La Charte canadienne des droits et libertés), in Canada often simply the Charter, is a bill of rights entrenched in the Constitution of Canada....
Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms - Wikipedia