The Phonetics Symbols Course - Lesson 1
This video course has been prepared to give language students a powerful tool for speaking English well. The videos aim to identify and help with the pronunciation of the 39 phonetic symbols of the En...
Hebrew alphabet
The Hebrew alphabet (Hebrew: אָלֶף־בֵּית עִבְרִי, alefbet ʿIvri ), known variously by scholars as the Jewish script, square script, block script, is used in the writing of the Hebrew language, as...
Hebrew alphabet - Wikipedia
Phoenician alphabet
The Phoenician alphabet, called by convention the Proto-Canaanite alphabet for inscriptions older than around 1200 BC, is the oldest verified consonantal alphabet, or abjad. It was used for the writin...
Runes
Runes (Proto-Norse: ᚱᚢᚾᛟ (runo), Old Norse: rún) are the letters in a set of related alphabets known as runic alphabets, which were used to write various Germanic languages before the adoption of the ...
Runes - Wikipedia
Shin (letter)
Shin (also spelled Šin (šīn) or Sheen) literally means "teeth", "press", and "sharp"; It is the twenty-first letter in many Semitic abjads, including Phoenician 𐤔, Aramaic/Hebrew ש, and Arabic ش̴...
Latin alpha
Latin alpha (majuscule: Ɑ, minuscule: ɑ) or script a is a letter of the Latin alphabet, based on one lowercase form of a, or on the Greek lowercase alpha (α). Although ⟨ɑ⟩ is normally ju...
Latin alpha - Wikipedia
Esh (letter)
Esh (majuscule: Ʃ Unicode U+01A9, minuscule: ʃ Unicode U+0283) is a character used in conjunction with the Latin script. Its lowercase form ʃ is similar to a long s ſ  or an integral sign ∫; in 1928 ...
Ć
The grapheme Ć (minuscule: ć), formed from C with the addition of an acute accent, is used in various languages. It usually denotes [t͡ɕ], the voiceless alveolo-palatal affricate, including in phoneti...
Aljamiado
Aljamiado ([alxaˈmjaðo]; Arabic: عَجَمِيَة‎ trans. ʿajamiyah) or Aljamía texts are manuscripts that use the Arabic script for transcribing European languages, especially Romance languages su...
Aljamiado - Wikipedia
Ø
Ø or (minuscule: ø) is a vowel and a letter used in the Danish, Norwegian, Faroese and Southern Sami languages. It is mostly used as a representation of mid front rounded vowels, such as [ø] and [œ], ...
Paleo-Hebrew alphabet
The Paleo-Hebrew alphabet (Hebrew: הכתב העברי הקדום‎), also Palaeo-Hebrew alphabet, is an abjad variant of the Phoenician alphabet. It dates to around the 10th century BCE. It was used as the ma...
Paleo-Hebrew alphabet - Wikipedia
Double grave accent
The double grave accent is a diacritic used in scholarly discussions of the Croatian, Serbian, and sometimes Slovene languages. It is also used in the International Phonetic Alphabet.In Croatian, Serb...
Double grave accent - Wikipedia
Ceirt
Ceirt (queirt) ᚊ is a letter of the Ogham alphabet, transcribed as . It expresses the Primitive Irish labiovelar phoneme. The 14th century Auraicept na n-Éces glosses the name as aball, meaning "apple...
Ruis
Ruis can mean:
Ruis - Wikipedia
Dalet
Dalet (dāleth, also spelled Daleth or Daled) is the fourth letter of many Semitic alphabets, including Phoenician, Aramaic, Hebrew ד, Syriac ܕ and Arabic dāl د (in abjadi order; 8th in modern order)....
Dalet - Wikipedia
Gimel
Gimel is the third letter of many Semitic alphabets, including Phoenician, Aramaic, Hebrew ג, Syriac ܓ and Arabic ǧīm ج (in alphabetical order; 5th in spelling order). Its sound value in the original...
Gimel - Wikipedia
Samaritan vocalization
The Samaritan vocalization (or Samaritan pointing, Samaritan niqqud, Hebrew: ניקוד שומרוני) is a system of diacritics devised by the Samaritans to add to the consonantal text of the Samaritan Pentateu...
Samaritan vocalization - Wikipedia
D with stroke
Đ (lowercase: đ, Latin alphabet), known as crossed D or dyet, formed from base character D/d overlaid with a crossbar. Crossing was used to create eth (ð), but eth has an uncial as its base whereas đ ...
D with stroke - Wikipedia
H with stroke
Ħ (minuscule: ħ) is a letter of the Latin alphabet, derived from H with the addition of a bar. It is used in Maltese for a voiceless pharyngeal fricative consonant (corresponding to the letter heth of...
Aleph
ʾĀlp is the first letter of many Semitic abjads (alphabets), including Phoenician Aleph , Syriac 'Ālap ܐ, Hebrew Aleph א, and Arabic Alif ا.The Phoenician letter is derived from one of Egyptian hier...
Aleph - Wikipedia
Ẽ is a letter in which the tilde indicates a nasal vowel. It is the 5th letter in the Guaraní alphabet and widely used in other Amerindian languages in Brazil, such as Kaingang.
Taw
Taw, tav, or taf is the twenty-second and last letter in many Semitic abjads, including Phoenician, Aramaic, Hebrew taw (Modern Hebrew: tav) ת and Arabic alphabet tāʼ ت (see below).Its original sound ...
Turned A
Turned A (capital: Ɐ or Ɒ, lowercase: ɐ or ɒ, math symbol ∀) is a symbol based upon the letter A.Lowercase ɐ (in two story form) is used in the International Phonetic Alphabet to identify the n...
X̣ (uppercase) or x̣ (lowercase) is a letter of the Latin alphabet, taken from an X with a dot below the letter. It is not easy to show up in computers because it is not used in the more common langua...
Anglo-Saxon runes
The Anglo-Saxon runes (also Anglo-Frisian), also known as futhorc (or fuþorc), is a runic alphabet, extended from the Elder Futhark from 24 to between 26 and 33 characters. They were used probably fr...
Anglo-Saxon runes - Wikipedia
U bar
U bar (majuscule: Ʉ, minuscule: ʉ) is a letter of the Latin alphabet, formed from U with the addition of a bar.In the International Phonetic Alphabet, the lowercase ʉ is used to represent a close cent...
Mem
Mem (also spelled Meem or Mim) is the thirteenth letter of many Semitic abjads, including Phoenician, Aramaic, Hebrew מ and Arabic م. Its value is [m].The Phoenician letter gave rise to the Greek Mu (...
Mem - Wikipedia