Linguistic typology
Linguistic typology is a subfield of linguistics that studies and classifies languages according to their structural and functional features. Its aim is to describe and explain the common properties a...
Word order
In linguistics, word order typology is the study of the order of the syntactic constituents of a language, and how different languages can employ different orders. Correlations between orders found in...
Word order - Wikipedia
Morphosyntactic alignment
In linguistics, morphosyntactic alignment is the grammatical relationship between arguments—specifically, between the two arguments (in English, subject and object) of transitive verbs like the dog ch...
Isolating language
An isolating language is a type of language with a low morpheme–word ratio – in the extreme case of an isolating language, each word contains a single morpheme.A closely related concept is the an...
Linguistic universals
A linguistic universal is a pattern that occurs systematically across natural languages, potentially true for all of them. For example, All languages have nouns and verbs, or If a language is spoken, ...
Synthetic language
In linguistic typology, a synthetic language is a language with a high morpheme-per-word ratio, as opposed to a low morpheme-per-word ratio in what is described as an isolating language. This linguist...
Slavic languages
The Slavic languages (also called Slavonic languages), a group of closely related languages of the Slavic peoples and a subgroup of Indo-European languages, have speakers in most of Eastern Europe, mu...
Slavic languages - Wikipedia
Object–verb–subject
In linguistic typology, object–verb–subject (OVS) or object–verb–agent (OVA) is a rare permutation of word order. OVS denotes the sequence object–verb–subject in unmarked expressions: Oranges ate Sam,...
Fusional language
A fusional language is a type of synthetic language, distinguished from agglutinative languages by their tendency to overlay many morphemes to denote grammatical, syntactic, or semantic change. For ex...
Time–manner–place
In linguistic typology, time–manner–place is a general order of adpositional phrases in a language's sentences: "yesterday", "by car", "to the store". It is common among languages with SOV word orders...
Direct–inverse language
The definition of a direct–inverse language is a matter under research, but it is widely understood to involve different grammar for transitive predications according to the relative positions of thei...
Chukchi language
Chukchi /ˈtʃʊktʃiː/ (Chukchee) is a Palaeosiberian language spoken by Chukchi people in the easternmost extremity of Siberia, mainly in Chukotka Autonomous Okrug. According to the Russian Census of 2...
Syntactic pivot
The syntactic pivot is the verb argument around which sentences "revolve", in a given language. This usually means the following:The first two characteristics have to do with simple morphosyntax, and ...
Head-marking language
A language is head-marking if the grammatical marks showing agreement between different words of a phrase tend to be placed on the heads (or nuclei) of phrases, rather than on the modifiers or depende...
Head-marking language - Wikipedia
Analytic language
An analytic language is a language that conveys grammatical relationships without using inflectional morphemes. A grammatical construction can similarly be called analytic if it uses unbound morphemes...
Case hierarchy
In linguistic typology, the case hierarchy states grammatical cases in order of their prominence. It should therefore be concluded that a language which makes use of any given case will also make use ...
Blocking (linguistics)
Blocking in linguistics, or more specifically in morphology, refers to the unacceptability of applying a morphological process on a certain word due to the presence of a competing form. Word formation...
Subject–verb–object
In linguistic typology, subject–verb–object (SVO) is a sentence structure where the subject comes first, the verb second, and the object third. Languages may be classified according to the dominant se...
Pipil language (typological overview)
This rather technical article provides a typological sketch of the Pipil language (also known as Nawat). Another related article outlines Pipil grammar in fuller detail. The distinctive purpose of the...
A-Pucikwar language
The Pucikwar language, A-Pucikwar, is an extinct language of the Andaman Islands, India, formerly spoken by the Pucikwar people on the south coast of Middle Andaman, the northeast coast of South Andam...
Basque language
Basque (endonym: Euskara, [eus̺ˈkaɾa]) is a language isolate ancestral to the Basque people, who are indigenous to and mainly inhabit the Basque Country, a region spanning an area in northeastern Sp...
Basque language - Wikipedia
Derived stem
Derived stems are a morphological feature of verbs common to the Semitic languages. In those languages, the vocabulary is based predominately on roots consisting of three or four consonants, wherein e...
Dravidian languages
The Dravidian languages are a language family spoken mainly in southern India and parts of eastern and central India as well as in northeastern Sri Lanka, Pakistan, Nepal, Bangladesh, and overseas in ...
Dravidian languages - Wikipedia
EXoSkeletal Model (Linguistics)
The eXoSkeletal Model in linguistics, or XSM, is a generative framework in morphology and morphosyntax, introduced in the work of Hagit Borer, professor of linguistics at the Queen Mary University of ...
Dependent-marking language
A language is dependent-marking if grammatical markers of agreement and case government between the words of phrases tend to appear more on dependents than on heads. The distinction between head-marki...
Dependent-marking language - Wikipedia
Vietnamese language
Vietnamese /ˌviɛtnəˈmiːz/ (tiếng Việt) is the national and official language of Vietnam. It is the native language of the Vietnamese (Kinh) people, as well as a first or second language for many ...
Vietnamese language - Wikipedia