Linguistic typology
Linguistic typology is a subfield of linguistics that studies and classifies languages according to their structural and functional features. Its aim is to describe and explain the common properties a...
Word order
In linguistics, word order typology is the study of the order of the syntactic constituents of a language, and how different languages can employ different orders. Correlations between orders found in...
Word order - Wikipedia
Morphosyntactic alignment
In linguistics, morphosyntactic alignment is the grammatical relationship between arguments—specifically, between the two arguments (in English, subject and object) of transitive verbs like the dog ch...
Isolating language
An isolating language is a type of language with a low morpheme–word ratio – in the extreme case of an isolating language, each word contains a single morpheme.A closely related concept is the an...
Linguistic universals
A linguistic universal is a pattern that occurs systematically across natural languages, potentially true for all of them. For example, All languages have nouns and verbs, or If a language is spoken, ...
Synthetic language
In linguistic typology, a synthetic language is a language with a high morpheme-per-word ratio, as opposed to a low morpheme-per-word ratio in what is described as an isolating language. This linguist...
Mohawk language
Mohawk /ˈmoʊhɔːk/ (Mohawk: Kanien’kéha [ɡa.njʌ̃ʔ.ˈɡe.ha] "[language] of the Flint Place") is an Iroquoian language currently spoken by around 3,000 people of the Mohawk nation in the United States (m...
Mohawk language - Wikipedia
Slavic languages
The Slavic languages (also called Slavonic languages), a group of closely related languages of the Slavic peoples and a subgroup of Indo-European languages, have speakers in most of Eastern Europe, mu...
Slavic languages - Wikipedia
Object–verb–subject
In linguistic typology, object–verb–subject (OVS) or object–verb–agent (OVA) is a rare permutation of word order. OVS denotes the sequence object–verb–subject in unmarked expressions: Oranges ate Sam,...
Fusional language
A fusional language is a type of synthetic language, distinguished from agglutinative languages by their tendency to overlay many morphemes to denote grammatical, syntactic, or semantic change. For ex...
Time–manner–place
In linguistic typology, time–manner–place is a general order of adpositional phrases in a language's sentences: "yesterday", "by car", "to the store". It is common among languages with SOV word orders...
Thai language
Thai, or more precisely Siamese or Central Thai, is the national and official language of Thailand and the native language of the Thai people and Thai Chinese. Thai is a member of the Tai group of the...
Thai language - Wikipedia
Inuit languages
The Inuit languages are a closely related group of Native American languages traditionally spoken across the North American Arctic and to some extent in the subarctic in Labrador. The related Yupik la...
Inuit languages - Wikipedia
Direct–inverse language
The definition of a direct–inverse language is a matter under research, but it is widely understood to involve different grammar for transitive predications according to the relative positions of thei...
Analytic language
An analytic language is a language that conveys grammatical relationships without using inflectional morphemes. A grammatical construction can similarly be called analytic if it uses unbound morphemes...
Case hierarchy
In linguistic typology, the case hierarchy states grammatical cases in order of their prominence. It should therefore be concluded that a language which makes use of any given case will also make use ...
Subject–verb–object
In linguistic typology, subject–verb–object (SVO) is a sentence structure where the subject comes first, the verb second, and the object third. Languages may be classified according to the dominant se...
Proto-Human language
The Proto-Human language (also Proto-Sapiens, Proto-World) is the speculative most recent common ancestor of all the world's languages.The concept of "Proto-Human" presupposes monogenesis of all natu...
Pipil language (typological overview)
This rather technical article provides a typological sketch of the Pipil language (also known as Nawat). Another related article outlines Pipil grammar in fuller detail. The distinctive purpose of the...
A-Pucikwar language
The Pucikwar language, A-Pucikwar, is an extinct language of the Andaman Islands, India, formerly spoken by the Pucikwar people on the south coast of Middle Andaman, the northeast coast of South Andam...
Ramree dialect
Ramree, or Yangbye (Burmese: ရမ်းဗြဲဘာသာစကား, [jáɴbjɛ́ bàðà zəɡá]), is the main dialect spoken in Southern Arakan, especially in Ramree Island region, Arakan State in Burma (Myanmar), and the Awag...
Realizational morphology
Realizational morphology or "word-and-paradigm" concentrates on the word form rather than segments of the word. WP morphology denies that morphemes are signs (form-content pairs). Instead, inflections...
Scrambling (linguistics)
Scrambling is a common term for pragmatic word order. In the Chomskyan tradition, every language is assumed to have a basic word order which is fundamental to its sentence structure, so languages whic...
Scrambling (linguistics) - Wikipedia
Basque language
Basque (endonym: Euskara, [eus̺ˈkaɾa]) is a language isolate ancestral to the Basque people, who are indigenous to and mainly inhabit the Basque Country, a region spanning an area in northeastern Sp...
Basque language - Wikipedia
Dravidian languages
The Dravidian languages are a language family spoken mainly in southern India and parts of eastern and central India as well as in northeastern Sri Lanka, Pakistan, Nepal, Bangladesh, and overseas in ...
Dravidian languages - Wikipedia
Ukrainian language
Ukrainian /juːˈkreɪniən/ (українська мова ukrayins'ka mova, [ukraˈjiɲsʲkɐ ˈmɔvɐ]) is an East Slavic language. It is the official state language of Ukraine and first of two principal languages of Ukra...
Ukrainian language - Wikipedia