Ethnolinguistics
Ethnolinguistics (sometimes called cultural linguistics) is a field of linguistics which studies the relationship between language and culture, and the way different ethnic groups perceive the world. ...
Speyer line
In German linguistics, the Speyer line, or Main line (Main river) is an isogloss separating the dialects to the north, which have a geminated (lengthened) stop in words like Appel "apple", from the di...
Speyer line - Wikipedia
Adpositional phrase
The term "adpositional phrase" is defined in linguistics as a syntactic category that includes prepositional phrases, postpositional phrases, and circumpositional phrases. Adpositional phrases contai...
Adpositional phrase - Wikipedia
Metalanguage
Broadly, any metalanguage is language or symbols used when language itself is being discussed or examined. In logic and linguistics, a metalanguage is a language used to make statements about statemen...
Father Tongue hypothesis
The Father Tongue hypothesis is an ethnolinguistic and population genetic hypothesis about language dispersal. A correlation was first reported between Y chromosomal haplogroups and the distribution o...
Gradualism
Gradualism, from Latin gradus (“step”), is a hypothesis, a theory or a tenet assuming that change comes about gradually or that variation is gradual in nature. Similar concepts are: uniformitarianism,...
Gradualism - Wikipedia
Archi-writing
"Archi-writing" (French: archi-écriture) is a term used by French philosopher Jacques Derrida in his attempt to re-orient the relationship between speech and writing. Derrida argued that as far b...
Gesamtbedeutung
Gesamtbedeutung (German for "general meaning", [ɡəˈzamtbəˌdɔʏtʊŋ]), in linguistics, is the general meaning of the various uses of a morphological element. The Gesamtbedeutung of a language's past tens...
Elative
Elative can refer to:
Metavariable (logic)
In logic, a metavariable (also metalinguistic variable or syntactical variable) is a symbol or symbol string which belongs to a metalanguage and stands for elements of some object language. For instan...
Chronotope
In literary theory and philosophy of language, the chronotope is how configurations of time and space are represented in language and discourse. The term was coined by Russian literary scholar M.M. Ba...
Yat
Yat or jat (Ѣ ѣ; italics: Ѣ ѣ) is the thirty-second letter of the old Cyrillic alphabet, as well as the name of the sound it represented. Its name in Old Church Slavonic is jěd’ (ѣдь) or iad...
Yat - Wikipedia
La Spezia–Rimini Line
The La Spezia–Rimini Line (sometimes also referred to as the Massa–Senigallia Line), in the linguistics of the Romance languages, is a line that demarcates a number of important isoglosses that distin...
La Spezia–Rimini Line - Wikipedia
Benrath line
In German linguistics, the Benrath line (German: Benrather Linie) is the maken-machen isogloss: dialects north of the line have the original /k/ in maken (to make), while those to the south have /x/ (...
Benrath line - Wikipedia
Cross-serial dependency
In linguistics, cross-serial dependencies (also called crossing dependencies by some authors) occur when the lines representing the dependency relations between two series of words cross over each oth...
Cross-serial dependency - Wikipedia
Conveyed concept
Conveyed concept is a set phrase that denotes a concept as understood or perceived. If someone explains an idea or if an idea is conveyed by some type of media then that idea or concept is a conveyed ...
Letter frequency effect
Letter frequency effect - the effect of letter frequency according to which the frequency with which the letter is encountered influences the recognition time of a letter. Letters of high frequency sh...
Uerdingen line
The Uerdingen Line (named after Uerdingen by Georg Wenker) is the isogloss within West Germanic languages that separates dialects which preserve the -k sound at the end of a word (north of the line) f...
Uerdingen line - Wikipedia
Harthill, Scotland
3°44′57″W / 55.860323°N 3.749256°W / 55.860323; -3.749256Harthill is a rural village in North Lanarkshire in Scotland, on the border with the neighbouring county of West Lothi...
Harthill, Scotland - Wikipedia
Underspecification
In theoretical linguistics, underspecification is a phenomenon in which certain features are omitted in underlying representations. Restricted underspecification theory holds that features should only...
Language island
A language island is an exclave of a language that is surrounded by one or more different languages. Examples of language islands:
Language island - Wikipedia
Boppard line
In German linguistics, the Boppard Line is an isogloss separating the dialects to the north, which have a /v/ in words such as Korv (or Korf), "basket", and leven, "to live", from the dialects to the...
Boppard line - Wikipedia
Isogloss
An isogloss—also called a heterogloss (see Etymology below)—is the geographic boundary of a certain linguistic feature, such as the pronunciation of a vowel, the meaning of a word, or use ...
Isogloss - Wikipedia
Interpretation (logic)
An interpretation is an assignment of meaning to the symbols of a formal language. Many formal languages used in mathematics, logic, and theoretical computer science are defined in solely syntactic te...
Joret line
The Joret line (French ligne Joret) is an isogloss used in the linguistics of the langues d'oïl. Dialects north of the line have preserved Vulgar Latin /k/ and /ɡ/ before /a/; dialects south of the li...
Joret line - Wikipedia
Co-occurrence
Co-occurrence or cooccurrence is a linguistics term that can either mean concurrence / coincidence or, in a more specific sense, the above-chance frequent occurrence of two terms from a text corpus al...
Hypocorrection
Hypocorrection is a linguistic phenomenon which involves the purposeful addition of slang in an attempt to appear less intelligible or soften the description. It contrasts with hesitation and modulati...
Iconicity
In functional-cognitive linguistics, as well as in semiotics, iconicity is the conceived similarity or analogy between the form of a sign (linguistic or otherwise) and its meaning, as opposed to arbit...
Sankt Goar line
In German linguistics, the Sankt Goar line, Das-Dat line (that), or the Was–Wat line (what) is an isogloss separating the dialects to the north, which have a /t/ in the words dat "that" and wat "what"...
Sankt Goar line - Wikipedia