List of Germanic deities
In Germanic paganism, the indigenous religion of the ancient Germanic peoples that inhabited Germanic Europe, there were a number of different gods and goddesses. Germanic deities are attested from nu...
List of Germanic deities - Wikipedia
Thor
In Norse mythology, Thor (/θɔr/; from Old Norse Þórr) is a hammer-wielding god associated with thunder, lightning, storms, oak trees, strength, the protection of mankind, and also hallowing, healing a...
Thor - Wikipedia
Wōden
In Germanic mythology, Odin (from Old Norse Óðinn) is a widely attested god. In Old Norse sources, where most surviving information about the god stems, Odin is associated with healing, death, royalty...
Wōden - Wikipedia
Æsir
In Old Norse, ǫ́ss (or áss, ás, plural æsir; feminine ásynja, plural ásynjur) is the term denoting a member of the principal pantheon in the indigenous Germanic religion known as Norse religion. This ...
Æsir - Wikipedia
Vanir
In Norse mythology, the Vanir (/ˈvɑːnɪr/; singular Vanr) are a group of gods associated with fertility, wisdom, nature, magic, and the ability to see the future. The Vanir are one of two groups of god...
Vanir - Wikipedia
Búri
Búri (or Buri) was the first god in Norse mythology. He is the father of Borr and grandfather of Odin, Vili and Ve. He was formed by the cow Auðumbla licking the salty ice of Ginnungagap. The only ext...
Búri - Wikipedia
Wade (folklore)
Wade (from the Old English Wada), is the English name for a common Germanic mythological character who, depending on location, is also known as Vadi (Norse) and Wate (Middle High German).
The earl...
Common Germanic deities
The article lists gods and goddesses (Ansewez, Wanizaz) that may be reconstructed for Proto-Germanic or Common Germanic Migration period paganism, or which figure in both West and North Germanic mytho...
Baldr
Baldr (also Balder, Baldur) is a god of light and purity in Norse mythology, and a son of the god Odin and the goddess Frigg. He has numerous brothers, such as Thor and Váli.In the 12th century, Danis...
Baldr - Wikipedia
Family tree of the Norse gods
This is a Family tree of the Norse gods showing the most important gods and goddesses in Norse mythology.Ymir is the first being, a giant who was born from venom that dripped from the icy rivers Élivá...
Thunor
In Norse mythology, Thor (/θɔr/; from Old Norse Þórr) is a hammer-wielding god associated with thunder, lightning, storms, oak trees, strength, the protection of mankind, and also hallowing, healing a...
Thunor - Wikipedia
Ēostre
Ēostre or Ostara (Old English: Ēastre, Northumbrian dialect Ēostre; Old High German: *Ôstara) is a Germanic divinity who, by way of the Germanic month bearing her name (Northumbrian: Ēosturmōn...
Ēostre - Wikipedia
Zisa (goddess)
Zisa or Cisa is a goddess in Germanic paganism, the best documented version of which is that of 10th and 11th century Norse religion. Zisa is an etymological double of Tyr or Ziu according to 19th cen...
Zisa (goddess) - Wikipedia
Wayland the Smith
In Germanic and Norse mythology, Wayland the Smith (Old English: Wēland; Old Norse: Völundr, Velentr; Old High German: Wiolant; Proto-Germanic: *Wēlandaz, from *Wēla-nandaz, lit. "batt...
Wayland the Smith - Wikipedia
Odin
In Germanic mythology, Odin (from Old Norse Óðinn) is a widely attested god. In Old Norse sources, where most surviving information about the god stems, Odin is associated with healing, death, royalty...
Odin - Wikipedia
"Isis" of the Suebi
In Roman historian Tacitus's first century CE book Germania, Tacitus describes the veneration of what he deems as an "Isis" of the Suebi. Due to Tacitus's usage of interpretatio romana elsewhere in th...
Frijjō
*Frijjō ("Frigg-Frija") is the reconstructed name or epithet of a hypothetical Common Germanic love goddess, the most prominent female member of the *Ansiwiz (gods), and often identified as the spouse...
Frijjō - Wikipedia
Endill
In Norse mythology, Endill is a jötunn, god or sea-king. He is attested in the Prose Edda list Nafnaþulur, and in various kennings.In Nafnaþulur, he is mentioned as only a name in a list of 75 sea kin...
Yngvi
Yngvi, Yngvin, Ingwine, Inguin are names that relate to an older theonym Ing and which appears to have been the older name for the god Freyr (originally an epithet, meaning "lord").Proto-Germanic *Ing...
Yngvi - Wikipedia
Freyja
In Norse mythology, Freyja (/ˈfreɪə/; Old Norse for "(the) Lady") is a goddess associated with love, sexuality, beauty, fertility, gold, seiðr, war, and death. Freyja is the owner of the necklace Brís...
Freyja - Wikipedia
Tanfana
Tanfana or Tamfana was a goddess of the Istvaeones in ancient Germanic paganism, the destruction of whose temple in the territory of the Marsi is mentioned in Tacitus' Annals.
In Annals Book 1, ch...
Ingunar-Freyr
Ingunar-Freyr is the name given to Freyr in the Lokasenna and in the Great saga of Saint Olaf.It is often assumed that Ingunar is the West-Germanic equivalent of the Scandinavian Yngvi.The meaning of...
Gullveig
In Norse mythology, Gullveig is a being who was speared by the Æsir, burnt three times, and yet thrice reborn. Upon her third rebirth, Gullveig's name becomes Heiðr and she is described as a knowledge...
Gullveig - Wikipedia
Þrúðvangr
In Norse mythology, Þrúðvangr (Old Norse "power-field", sometimes anglicized as Thrudvang or Thruthvang) or Þrúðvangr (plural form) is/are a field/fields where the god Thor resides. The field is attes...
Ásatrú
Germanic neopaganism, also known as Heathenry or Heathenism, Ásatrú (English: Esetroth or Ostroth), Forn Siðr, and also Odinism and Theodism, is the contemporary revival of historical Germanic paganis...
Ásatrú - Wikipedia
Urðr
Urðr (Old Norse "fate") is one of the Norns in Norse mythology. Along with Verðandi (possibly "happening" or "present") and Skuld (possibly "debt" or "future"), Urðr makes up a trio of Norns that are ...
Vanaheimr
In Norse mythology, Vanaheimr (Old Norse "home of the Vanir") is one of the Nine Worlds and home of the Vanir, a group of gods associated with fertility, wisdom, and the ability to see the future. Van...