Aug 2, 216BC-Ancient Rome’s Darkest Day: The Battle Of Cannae
Republican Rome was pushed to the brink of collapse on August 2, 216 B.C., when the Carthaginian general Hannibal annihilated at least 50,000 of its legionaries at the Second Punic War’s Battle of Can...
12 Ranks Of Roman Military Officers And What They Did
The Roman Empire saw one of the first truly professional armies in history, and became the inspiration for European armies that followed it. Though its officers didn’t have the same titles as their mo...
Found, Where Caesar Decimated The Dutch: Archaeologists Pinpoint Site Of Battle That Left 150,000 Dead
Archaeologists claim to have proved that Julius Caesar set foot on what is now Dutch soil, destroying two Germanic tribes in a battle that left 150,000 people dead.
Islamic State Militants Blow Up Ancient Arch Of Triumph In Palmyra, Antiquities Chief Says
Militants from the Islamic State group (IS) have blown up the Arch of Triumph, a major monument in the 2,000-year-old Roman city of Palmyra, Syria's antiquities chief says. Maamoun Abdulkarim said sou...
Archaeologists Unearth Intact Pre-Roman Tomb In Pompeii
It’s one of the most famous natural disasters in history. On August 24, 79 A.D., Mount Vesuvius erupted, sending floods of ash, pumice and other debris onto the city of Pompeii, located at the volcano...
The real story behind the assassination of Julius Caesar
On Feb. 15, in the year 44 BC, Julius Caesar, the all-powerful ruler of Rome, visited a soothsayer named Spurinna, who “predicted the future by examining the internal organs of sacrificial animals,” a...
History of Rome
Italy is a country in Europe, it's a member of the European Union and NATO. Italy's capital is Rome and it has a gloryous history. Rome grew from a humble co...
Islamic Cairo
Islamic Cairo is a part of central Cairo noted for its historically important mosques and other Islamic monuments. It is overlooked by the Cairo Citadel.Islamic Cairo, also referred to as Medieval Cai...
Islamic Cairo - Wikipedia
Norman and Medieval London
This article covers the history of London from the Norman conquest of England in 1066 to the late 15th century.
The Norman invasion of Britain in 1066 is usually considered to be the beginning of ...
Norman and Medieval London - Wikipedia
History of Rome
The history of Rome spans more than two-and-a-half millennia of the existence of a city that grew from a small Latin village in the 8th century BC into the centre of a vast civilisation that dominated...
History of Rome - Wikipedia
Origines
Origines ("Origins") is the title of a historical work by Marcus Porcius Cato.
This highly original work was the first prose history in Latin, and among the very first Latin prose works in any gen...
Nikephoros (Caesar)
Nikephoros (Greek: Νικηφόρος), also Latinized as Nicephorus or Nicephoros, was the second son of Byzantine emperor Constantine V (reigned 741–775) and Caesar of the Byzantine Empire. He was engage...
Aug 2, 216BC-Ancient Rome’s Darkest Day: The Battle Of Cannae
Republican Rome was pushed to the brink of collapse on August 2, 216 B.C., when the Carthaginian general Hannibal annihilated at least 50,000 of its legionaries at the Second Punic War’s Battle of Can...
John of Calore
John of Calore was Chancellor of the University of Paris in the late 14th century. He was one of a number of theologians who was investigated for suspect teaching, based on statements he made during v...
Treaty of Westminster (1462)
The Treaty of Westminster (or the Treaty of Westminster-Ardtornish) was signed on 13 February 1462 between Edward IV of England of the House of York and the Scottish Lord of the Isles, John of Islay, ...
Treaty of Westminster (1462) - Wikipedia
Martyrs of Palestine
On the Martyrs of Palestine is a work by the church historian and Bishop of Caesarea, Eusebius (AD 263 – 339), relating the persecution of Christians in Caesarea during the persecutions under Diocleti...
Martyrs of Palestine - Wikipedia
Cosmati
The Cosmati were a Roman family, seven members of which, for four generations, were skilful architects, sculptors and workers in decorative geometric mosaic, mostly for church floors. Their name is co...
Cosmati - Wikipedia
St. Peter's Basilica
St. Peter's Basilica (Latin: Basilica Sancti Petri; Italian: Basilica di San Pietro in Vaticano) is a Late Renaissance church located within Vatican City.Designed principally by Donato Bramant...
St. Peter's Basilica - Wikipedia
Condemnations of 1210–1277
The Condemnations at the medieval University of Paris were enacted to restrict certain teachings as being heretical. These included a number of medieval theological teachings, but most importantly the...
Condemnations of 1210–1277 - Wikipedia
Praepositinus
Praepositinus (Gilbert Prevostin of Cremona, Prevostinus Cremonensis) (c. 1150 – 1210) was an Italian scholastic philosopher and theologian. He was a liturgical commentator, and supporter a res-theory...
William Fulbecke
William Fullbecke (1560–1603?) was an English playwright, historian, lawyer and legal scholar, who did pioneering work in international law. He described himself as "maister of Artes, and student of t...
Stand of the Swiss Guard
The Stand of the Swiss Guard took place during the sacking of Rome on May 6, 1527, when the Pope's Swiss guards held off troops loyal to the Habsburgs long enough for Pope Clement to escape.
The V...
Stand of the Swiss Guard - Wikipedia
Siege of Alexandria (641)
The major Mediterranean port of Alexandria, the capital of the province of Egypt, was permanently seized from the (Eastern Roman, or) Byzantine Empire by forces of the Rashidun Caliphate in the middle...
Siege of Alexandria (641) - Wikipedia
Bayt Al-Suhaymi
Bayt Al-Suhaymi ("House of Suhaymi") is an old Ottoman era house museum in Cairo, Egypt. It was originally built in 1648 by Abdel Wahab el Tablawy along the Darb al-Asfar, a very prestigious and expe...
Bayt Al-Suhaymi - Wikipedia