Fake Memory Implants
Implanting fake memories into your brain could treat depression. Video credit: Hashem Al-Ghaili
Selective omission
The selective omission is a memory bias. In collective memory it's a bias where a group (state, media, public opinion) work to forget some traumatic memories.This expressions is often used for post-wa...
Selective omission - Wikipedia
Memory inhibition
In psychology, memory inhibition is the ability not to remember irrelevant information. The scientific concept of memory inhibition should not be confused with everyday uses of the word "inhibition." ...
Von Restorff effect
The Von Restorff effect (named after psychiatrist and children's paediatrician Hedwig von Restorff 1906–1962), also called the isolation effect, predicts that an item that "stands out like a sore thum...
Fading affect bias
The fading affect bias, more commonly known as FAB, is a psychological phenomenon in which information regarding negative emotions tends to be forgotten more quickly than that associated with pleasant...
Positivity effect
In psychology and cognitive science, the positivity effect is a term given to three different phenomena.
The positivity effect pertains to the tendency of people, when evaluating the causes of the...
Cue-dependent forgetting
Cue-dependent forgetting, or retrieval failure, is the failure to recall information without memory cues. The term either pertains to Semantic cues, State-dependent cues or Context-dependent cues.
Illusory superiority
Illusory superiority is a cognitive bias whereby individuals overestimate their own qualities and abilities, relative to others. This is evident in a variety of areas including intelligence, performan...
The Candle Problem
The candle problem or candle task, also known as Duncker's candle problem, is a cognitive performance test, measuring the influence of functional fixedness on a participant's problem solving capabilit...
Cryptomnesia
Cryptomnesia occurs when a forgotten memory returns without it being recognized as such by the subject, who believes it is something new and original. It is a memory bias whereby a person may falsely ...
Functional fixedness
Functional fixedness is a cognitive bias that limits a person to using an object only in the way it is traditionally used. The concept of functional fixedness originated in Gestalt Psychology, a movem...
Levels-of-processing effect
The levels-of-processing effect, identified by Fergus I. M. Craik and Robert S. Lockhart in 1972, describes memory recall of stimuli as a function of the depth of mental processing. Deeper levels of ...
Overconfidence effect
The overconfidence effect is a well-established bias in which a person's subjective confidence in his or her judgments is reliably greater than the objective accuracy of those judgments, especially wh...
Telescoping effect
In cognitive psychology, the telescoping effect (or telescoping bias) refers to the temporal displacement of an event whereby people perceive recent events as being more remote than they are and dista...
Telescoping effect - Wikipedia
Selective memory loss
A form of amnesia, selective amnesia is a rare side effect of head injuries when the victim loses certain parts of his/her memory. Not much is known because this only results when certain areas of the...
Reminiscence bump
The reminiscence bump is the tendency for older adults to have increased recollection for events that occurred during their adolescence and early adulthood. It was identified through the study of auto...
Reminiscence bump - Wikipedia
Serial memory processing
Serial memory processing is the act of attending to and processing one item at a time. This is usually contrasted against parallel memory processing, which is the act of attending to and processing al...
Serial memory processing - Wikipedia
Gender differences in eyewitness memory
The evidence regarding gender differences in eyewitness memory is contradictory. Studies that have found differences note that women are more capable of remembering details regarding other women at th...
Choice-supportive bias
In cognitive science, choice-supportive bias is the tendency to retroactively ascribe positive attributes to an option one has selected. It is a cognitive bias. For example, if a person buys a compute...
Google effect
The Google effect is the tendency to forget information that can be found readily online by using Internet search engines such as Google. According to the first study about the Google effect people ar...
Bluma Zeigarnik
Bluma Wulfovna Zeigarnik (Russian: Блю́ма Ву́льфовна Зейга́рник; 9 November 1901 – 24 February 1988) was a Soviet psychologist and psychiatrist, a member of Berlin School of experimental psycholog...
Childhood amnesia
Childhood amnesia, also called infantile amnesia, is the inability of adults to retrieve episodic memories before the age of 2–4 years, as well as the period before age 10 of which adults retain fewer...
Modality effect
The modality effect is a term used in experimental psychology, most often in the fields dealing with memory and learning, to refer to how learner performance depends on the presentation mode of studie...
Self-referential encoding
Every day, people are presented with endless amounts of information, and in an effort to help keep track and organize this information, people must be able to recognize, differentiate and store inform...
Confirmation bias
Confirmation bias, also called myside bias, is the tendency to search for, interpret, or recall information in a way that confirms one's beliefs or hypotheses. It is a type of cognitive bias and a sys...
Confirmation bias - Wikipedia
Rosy retrospection
Rosy retrospection refers to the finding that subjects later rate past events more positively than they had actually rated them when the event occurred, reminiscent of the Latin phrase memoria praeter...
Illusory truth effect
The truth effect, the illusory truth effect or the illusion-of-truth effect is the tendency to believe information to be correct because we are exposed to it more times.
The effect was first named...