Mesopotamian mythology
Mesopotamian religion refers to the religious beliefs and practices followed by the Sumerian and East Semitic Akkadian, Assyrian, Babylonian and later migrant Arameans and Chaldeans, living in Mesopot...
Mesopotamian mythology - Wikipedia
Panbabylonism
Panbabylonism is a school of thought within Assyriology and Religious studies that considers the Hebrew Bible and Judaism as directly derived from Mesopotamian (Babylonian) mythology. Appearing in the...
Panbabylonism - Wikipedia
Mesopotamian religion
Mesopotamian religion refers to the religious beliefs and practices followed by the Sumerian and East Semitic Akkadian, Assyrian, Babylonian and later migrant Arameans and Chaldeans, living in Mesopot...
Mesopotamian religion - Wikipedia
Enûma Eliš
The Enûma Eliš (Akkadian Cuneiform: 𒂊𒉡𒈠𒂊𒇺, also spelled "Enuma Elish"), is the Babylonian creation mythos (named after its opening words). It was recovered by Austen Henry Layard in 1849 (in frag...
Epic of Gilgamesh
The Epic of Gilgamesh is an epic poem from ancient Mesopotamia. Dating from the Third Dynasty of Ur (circa 2100 BC), it is often regarded as the first great work of literature. The literary history o...
Epic of Gilgamesh - Wikipedia
Uridimmu
Urdimmu, “Mad/raging Lion,” Sumerian UR.IDIM and giš.pirig.gal = ur-gu-lu-ú = ur-idim-[mu] in the lexical series ḪAR.gud = imrû = ballu, was an ancient Mesopotamian mythical creature in the form of a ...
Du-Ku
Du-Ku or dul-kug is an Akkadian word for a sacred place.
According to Wasilewska et al., du-ku translates as "holy hill", "holy mound" [...E-dul-kug... (House which is the holy mound)], or "gr...
Du-Ku - Wikipedia
Suzianna
Suzianna was the second wife of the Sumerian god Enlil. Her shrine was recorded to be in the Ekur.
Suzianna - Wikipedia
Kur
In Sumerian mythology, Kur is considered the first ever dragon, and usually referred to the Zagros mountains to the east of Sumer. The cuneiform for "kur" was written ideographically with the cuneif...
Seron
In Flavius Josephus's Antiquities of the Jews Seron was a town built shortly after Noah's Ark rested on the mountains. Josephus relies on Moses Chorenensis, writing that Chorensis "also says elsewher...
Noah
In Abrahamic religions, Noah (/ˈnoʊ.ə/), or Noé or Noach (Hebrew: נֹחַ,‎ נוֹחַ,  Noaẖ,  Nōăḥ; Syriac: ܢܘܚ Nukh; Arabic: نُوح‎ Nūḥ; Ancient Greek: Νῶε), was the tenth...
Noah - Wikipedia
Ziusudra
Ziusudra (also Zi-ud-sura and Zin-Suddu; Hellenized Xisuthros: "found long life" or "life of long days") of Shuruppak is listed in the WB-62 Sumerian king list recension as the last king of Sumer prio...
Urshanabi
Urshanabi was the ferryman of the Hubur, river of the dead in Mesopotamian mythology. His equivalent in Greek Mythology was Charon.He is first mentioned in the myth of Enlil and Ninlil, where he is ca...
Urshanabi - Wikipedia
Zaqar
In Mesopotamian mythology, Zaqar or Dzakar is the messenger of the god Sin. He relays these messages to mortals through his power over their dreams and nightmares.
Six-headed Wild Ram
The Six-headed Wild Ram (from Sumerian šeg-saĝ-6: ram with six heads) in Sumerian mythology was one of the Heroes slain by Ninurta, patron god of Lagash, in ancient Iraq. Its body was hung on the dust...
Lament for Ur
The Lament for Ur, or Lamentation over the city of Ur is a Sumerian lament composed around the time of the fall of Ur to the Elamites and the end of the city's third dynasty (c. 2000 BC).
It conta...
Lament for Ur - Wikipedia
Cthulhu
Cthulhu is a deity created by writer H. P. Lovecraft and first introduced in the short story "The Call of Cthulhu", published in the pulp magazine Weird Tales in 1928. Considered a Great Old One ...
Myths of Babylonia and Assyria
Donald Alexander Mackenzie (24 July 1873 – 2 March 1936) was a Scottish journalist and folklorist and a prolific writer on religion, mythology and anthropology in the early 20th century.
Mac...
Debate between sheep and grain
The Debate between sheep and grain or Myth of cattle and grain is a Sumerian creation myth, written on clay tablets in the mid to late 3rd millennium BCE.
Seven "debate" topics are known from the ...
Babylonian religion
Babylonian religion is the religious practice of Babylonia. Babylonian mythology was greatly influenced by their Sumerian counterparts, and was written on clay tablets inscribed with the cuneiform scr...
Babylonian religion - Wikipedia
Hurrians
The Hurrians (/ˈhʊəriənz/; cuneiform: 𒄷𒌨𒊑; transliteration: Ḫu-ur-ri) were a people of the Bronze Age Near East. They spoke a Hurro-Urartian language called Hurrian, and lived in Anatolia and North...
Hurrians - Wikipedia
Humbaba
In Ancient Mesopotamian religion, Humbaba (𒄷𒌝𒁀𒁀 Assyrian spelling) or Huwawa (𒄷𒉿𒉿 Sumerian spelling), also Humbaba the Terrible, was a monstrous giant of immemorial age raised by Utu, the Sun. ...
Enlil and Ninlil
Enlil and Ninlil or the Myth of Enlil and Ninlil or Enlil and Ninlil: The begetting of Nanna is a Sumerian creation myth, written on clay tablets in the mid to late 3rd millennium BC.
The first li...
Enlil and Ninlil - Wikipedia
Strong copper
the Strong Copper (from Sumerian urud niĝ kalag-ga) in Sumerian mythology was one of the valuable items seized by Ninurta, patron god of Lagash, in ancient Iraq. This spoil was hung "on the inside pol...
Anzû (mythology)
Anzû, before misread as Zû (Sumerian: AN.ZUD2, AN.ZUD, AN.IM.DUGUD.MUŠEN; cuneiform: an.zud.mušen), also known as Imdugud, is a lesser divinity or monster in several Mesopotamian religions. He was co...
Anzû (mythology) - Wikipedia