Metallism
Metallism is the economic principle that money derives its value from the purchasing power of the commodity upon which it is based. The currency in a metallist monetary system may be made from the co...
Gold standard
A gold standard is a monetary system in which the standard economic unit of account is based on a fixed quantity of gold. Three types can be distinguished: specie, exchange, and bullion. Most nations ...
Gold standard - Wikipedia
Modern gold dinar
The modern Islamic gold dinar (sometimes referred as Islamic dinar or Gold dinar) is a currency that aims to revive the historical gold dinar which was a leading coin of early Islam. They consist of m...
Modern gold dinar - Wikipedia
Sound Currency Association
The Sound Currency Association was a British pressure group formed in early 1920 as a result of a conference of bankers, traders and economists held in December 1919 to consider the financial outlook ...
Scheidemünze
Scheidemünzen (singular - Scheidemünze) were representative coins issued amidst the "Kurantgeldes" (in Germany practically right up until the start of the First World War in August 1914) whose metal v...
Currency war
Currency war, also known as competitive devaluation, is a condition in international affairs where countries compete against each other to achieve a relatively low exchange rate for their own currency...
Currency war - Wikipedia
Price–specie flow mechanism
The price–specie flow mechanism is a logical argument by David Hume (1711–1776) against the Mercantilist idea that a nation should strive for a positive balance of trade, or net exports. The argument ...
Price–specie flow mechanism - Wikipedia
Silver metallism
Silver metallism is a form of metallism in which silver is used as either the sole type of widely accepted and circulated money (as in silver monometallism) or as one of several metals in that role (a...
Coin's Financial School
Coin's Financial School was a popular pamphlet written in 1894 that helped popularize the free silver and populist movements. The author of the text "Coin", William Hope Harvey, would later go on to a...
Coin's Financial School - Wikipedia
Kararname (disambiguation)
Kararname is a Turkish word for a proclamation, or a government decree.There have been several notable kararnameler in the history of the Ottoman empire and, later, Turkey. These include:"Kararname" m...
Coinage Act 1816
The Coinage Act 1816 (56 Geo. III c.68), also known as Liverpool's Act, defined the value of the pound sterling relative to gold but of an unchanged monetary standard for gold. One troy pound of stan...
Coinage Act 1816 - Wikipedia
Representative money
The term representative money has been used variously to mean:Historically, the use of representative money predates the invention of coinage. In the ancient empires of Egypt, Babylon, India and China...
Representative money - Wikipedia
Washington Consensus
The term Washington Consensus was coined in 1989 by English economist John Williamson to refer to a set of 10 relatively specific economic policy prescriptions that he considered constituted the "stan...
Bretton Woods system
The Bretton Woods system of monetary management established the rules for commercial and financial relations among the world's major industrial states in the mid-20th century. The Bretton Woods system...
Bretton Woods system - Wikipedia
Fixed exchange-rate system
A fixed exchange rate, sometimes called a pegged exchange rate, is a type of exchange rate regime where a currency's value is fixed against either the value of another single currency, to a basket of ...
Fixed exchange-rate system - Wikipedia
Commodity money
Commodity money is money whose value comes from a commodity of which it is made. Commodity money consists of objects that have value in themselves as well as value in their use as money.Examples of co...
Commodity money - Wikipedia
Gresham's law
Gresham's law is an economic principle that states: "When a government overvalues one type of money and undervalues another, the undervalued money will leave the country or disappear from circulation ...
Bimetallism
In economics, bimetallism is a monetary standard in which the value of the monetary unit is defined as equivalent both to a certain quantity of gold and to a certain quantity of silver; such a system ...
Bimetallism - Wikipedia
Currency War of 2009-2011
The Currency War of 2009–2011 is an episode of competitive devaluation which became prominent in September 2010. Competitive devaluation involves states competing with each other to achieve a relativ...
Currency War of 2009-2011 - Wikipedia
Silver standard
The silver standard is a monetary system in which the standard economic unit of account is a fixed weight of silver. The silver specie standard was widespread from the fall of the Byzantine Empire un...
Post–World War II economic expansion
The post–World War II economic expansion, also known as the postwar economic boom, the long boom, and the Golden Age of Capitalism, was a period of economic prosperity in the mid-20th century which oc...
Post–World War II economic expansion - Wikipedia
Limping bimetallism
Limping bimetallism was a monetary system in the United States that was partially dependent on silver but primarily dependent on gold. It was developed after the abandonment of bimetallism and the ado...
Limping bimetallism - Wikipedia
Reserve currency
A reserve currency (or anchor currency) is a currency that is held in significant quantities by governments and institutions as part of their foreign exchange reserves. The reserve currency is common...
Cornering the market
In finance, to corner the market is to get sufficient control of a particular stock, commodity, or other asset to allow the price to be manipulated. Another definition: "To have the greatest market sh...
Convertibility
Convertibility is the quality that allows money or other financial instruments to be converted into other liquid stores of value. Convertibility is an important factor in international trade, where in...
Gold points
Gold points was a term which referred to the rates of foreign exchange likely to cause movements of gold between countries adhering to the gold standard.
In accordance with the law of supply and d...
Trade coin
Trade coins are coins minted by a government, but not necessarily current within the territory of the issuing country. These quasi bullion coins (in rarer cases small change) were thus actually export...
Trade coin - Wikipedia
William Jennings Bryan presidential campaign, 1896
In 1896, William Jennings Bryan ran unsuccessfully for President of the United States. Bryan, a former Democratic congressman from Nebraska, gained his party's presidential nomination in July of tha...
William Jennings Bryan presidential campaign, 1896 - Wikipedia
Bullionism
Bullionism is an economic theory that defines wealth by the amount of precious metals owned. Bullionism is an early or primitive form of mercantilism. It was derived, in the 16th century, from the obs...
Bullionism - Wikipedia
International monetary systems
International monetary systems are sets of internationally agreed rules, conventions and supporting institutions, that facilitate international trade, cross border investment and generally the realloc...
International monetary systems - Wikipedia