NMR imaging
Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMRI), or magnetic resonance tomography (MRT) is a medical imaging technique used in radiology to investigate the anatomy and phys...
NMR imaging - Wikipedia
Physics of magnetic resonance imaging
Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a medical imaging technique used in radiology to investigate the anatomy and physiology of the body and the physics of the technique involves the interaction of mat...
Physics of magnetic resonance imaging - Wikipedia
Spin-lattice relaxation time
Spin–lattice relaxation is the mechanism by which the z component of the magnetization vector comes into thermodynamic equilibrium with its surroundings (the "lattice") in nuclear magnetic resonance a...
Spin-spin relaxation time
Visualization of the and relaxation times.In physics, the spin–spin relaxation is the mechanism by which Mxy, the transverse component of the magnetization vector, exponentially decays towards its...
Spin-spin relaxation time - Wikipedia
Diffusion MRI
Diffusion MRI (or dMRI) is a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) method which came into existence in the mid-1980s. It allows the mapping of the diffusion process of molecules, mainly water, in biologica...
Diffusion MRI - Wikipedia
Magnetization transfer
Magnetization transfer (MT), as commonly used in biomedical MRI, refers to the transfer of longitudinal magnetization from the hydrogen nuclei of water that has restricted motion to the hydrogen nucle...
Fluid attenuated inversion recovery
Fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) is a pulse sequence used in magnetic resonance imaging which was invented by Dr. Graeme Bydder. FLAIR can be used with both three-dimensional imaging (3D F...
Fluid attenuated inversion recovery - Wikipedia
Magnetic resonance angiography
Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) is a group of techniques based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to image blood vessels. Magnetic resonance angiography is used to generate images of arteries (a...
Magnetic resonance angiography - Wikipedia
In vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy
In vivo (that is 'in the living organism') magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is a specialised technique associated with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), also...
In vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy - Wikipedia
Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy
Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, most commonly known as NMR spectroscopy, is a research technique that exploits the magnetic properties of certain atomic nuclei. It determines the physical and...
Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy - Wikipedia
Functional magnetic resonance imaging
Functional magnetic resonance imaging or functional MRI (fMRI) is a functional neuroimaging procedure using MRI technology that measures brain activity by detecting associated changes in blood flow. T...
Functional magnetic resonance imaging - Wikipedia
Real-time MRI
Real-time magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) refers to the continuous monitoring ("filming") of moving objects in real time. Because MRIis based on time-consuming scanning of k-space, real-time MRI was ...
Real-time MRI - Wikipedia
Interventional MRI
Interventional magnetic resonance imaging, also Interventional MRI or IMRI, is the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to do interventional radiology procedures.Because of the lack of harmful effe...
Susceptibility weighted imaging
Susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI), originally called BOLD venographic imaging, uses a type of contrast in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) different from traditional spin density, T1, or T2 imagin...
Susceptibility weighted imaging - Wikipedia
MRI contrast agent
MRI contrast agents are a group of contrast media used to improve the visibility of internal body structures in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The most commonly used compounds for contrast enhanc...
MRI contrast agent - Wikipedia
Relaxation (NMR)
In nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) the term relaxation describes how signals change with time. In general signals deteriorate with time, becoming we...
Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of proteins
Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of proteins (usually abbreviated protein NMR) is a field of structural biology in which NMR spectroscopy is used to obtain information about the structure and d...
Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of proteins - Wikipedia
J-coupling
Scalar or J-couplings (also called indirect dipole dipole coupling) are mediated through chemical bonds connecting two spins. It is an indirect interaction between two nuclear spins which arises from ...
J-coupling - Wikipedia
Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of carbohydrates
Carbohydrate NMR Spectroscopy is the application of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to structural and conformational analysis of carbohydrates. This method allows the scientists to eluci...
Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of carbohydrates - Wikipedia
Solid-state NMR
Solid-state NMR (SSNMR) spectroscopy is a kind of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, characterized by the presence of anisotropic (directionally dependent) interactions.
A spin interac...
Solid-state NMR - Wikipedia
Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of nucleic acids
Nucleic acid NMR is the use of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to obtain information about the structure and dynamics of nucleic acid molecules, such as DNA or RNA. It is useful for molecules...
2D-NMR
Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (2D NMR) is a set of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) methods which give data plotted in a space defined by two frequency axes rath...
2D-NMR - Wikipedia
K-space (MRI)
k-space is a formalism widely used in magnetic resonance imaging introduced in 1979 by Likes and in 1983 by Ljunggren and Twieg.In MRI physics, k-space is the 2D or 3D Fourier transform of the MR imag...
K-space (MRI) - Wikipedia
Nuclear magnetic resonance
Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a physical phenomenon in which nuclei in a magnetic field absorb and re-emit electromagnetic radiation. This energy is at a specific resonance frequency which depen...
Nuclear magnetic resonance - Wikipedia
Chemical shift
In nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, the chemical shift is the resonant frequency of a nucleus relative to a standard. Often the position and number of chemical shifts are diagnostic of ...
Chemical shift - Wikipedia