Nara period
The Nara period (奈良時代, Nara jidai) of the history of Japan covers the years from AD 710 to 794. Empress Gemmei established the capital of Heijō-kyō (present-day Nara). Except for a five-year p...
Nara period - Wikipedia
Nihon Shoki
The Nihon Shoki (日本書紀), sometimes translated as The Chronicles of Japan, is the second oldest book of classical Japanese history. The book is also called the Nihongi (日本紀, lit. Japanese Ch...
Nihon Shoki - Wikipedia
Man'yōshū
The Man'yōshū (万葉集, literally "Collection of Ten Thousand Leaves", but see Name below) is the oldest existing collection of Japanese poetry, compiled sometime after 759 AD during the Nara period. ...
Man'yōshū - Wikipedia
Northern Fujiwara
The Northern Fujiwara (奥州藤原氏 Ōshū Fujiwara-shi) were a Japanese noble family that ruled the Tōhoku region (the northeast of Honshū) of Japan from the 12th to the 13th centuries as if it were their own...
Northern Fujiwara - Wikipedia
Fujiwara no Maro
Fujiwara no Maro (藤原 麻呂, 695 – August 17, 737) was a Japanese statesman, courtier, and politician during the Nara period. Maro established the Kyōke branch of the Fujiwara clan.
Maro was a mi...
Fujiwara no Maro - Wikipedia
List of Important Cultural Properties of Japan (Nara period: structures)
This list is of Japanese structures dating from the Nara period (710–794) that have been designated Important Cultural Properties (including *National Treasures). Twenty-three surviving sites with the...
List of Important Cultural Properties of Japan (Nara period: structures) - Wikipedia
Stroke (CJKV character)
CJKV strokes are the calligraphic strokes needed to write the Chinese characters in regular script used in East Asia. CJK strokes are the classified set of line patterns that may be arranged and combi...
Stroke (CJKV character) - Wikipedia
Chōonpu
The chōonpu (長音符), also known as onbiki (音引き), bōbiki (棒引き), or Katakana-Hiragana Prolonged Sound Mark by the Unicode Consortium, is a Japanese symbol which indicates a chōon, or a long vo...
Chōonpu - Wikipedia
Tōdai-ji
Tōdai-ji (東大寺, Eastern Great Temple), is a Buddhist temple complex, that was once one of the powerful Seven Great Temples, located in the city of Nara, Japan. Its Great Buddha Hall (大仏殿, ...
Tōdai-ji - Wikipedia
Kume no Wakame
Kume no Wakame (久米 若女 or 久米 若売, dead July 30, 780) was a Japanese muraji and mother of Fujiwara no Momokawa, whose daughter became the Empress (postuhumously) of Emperor Heizei, the 51st emperor o...
Fujiwara no Momokawa
Fujiwara no Momokawa (藤原 百川, 732 - August 28, 779) was a Japanese statesman, courtier and politician during the Nara period. His original name was Odamaro (雄田麻呂).
He was a minister during...
Fujiwara no Momokawa - Wikipedia
Fujiwara no Nakamaro
Fujiwara no Nakamaro (藤原 仲麻呂, 706 - October 21, 764), also known as Emi no Oshikatsu (恵美 押勝), was a Japanese aristocrat (kuge), courtier, and statesman. He was Chancellor (Daijō-daijin) of th...
Fujiwara no Nakamaro - Wikipedia
Fujiwara no Fusasaki
Fujiwara no Fusasaki (藤原 房前, 681 – May 25, 737) was a member of the Fujiwara clan and the founder of the Hokke branch of the Fujiwara.
Fusasaki was a Sangi (associate counselor) in the Daijō-kan.H...
Nihon Kōki
Nihon Kōki (日本後紀) is an officially commissioned Japanese history text. Completed in 840, it is the third volume in the Six National Histories. It covers the years 792-833.
Following the earlie...
Prince Nagaya
Nagaya (長屋王 Nagaya-no-ōkimi or Nagaya-ō) (684 – 20 March 729) was a politician of the Nara period and an imperial prince of Japan, a son of Prince Takechi (grandson of Emperor Temmu).His father was Pr...
Prince Nagaya - Wikipedia
Kasuga-taisha
Kasuga Grand Shrine (春日大社, Kasuga-taisha) is a Shinto shrine in the city of Nara, in Nara Prefecture, Japan. Established in 768 AD and rebuilt several times over the centuries, it is the shrin...
Kasuga-taisha - Wikipedia
Ruijū Kokushi
Ruijū Kokushi (類聚国史) is a historical text that categorizes and chronologizes the events listed in the Six National Histories. It was compiled by Sugawara no Michizane and completed in 892. The tex...
Ruijū Kokushi - Wikipedia
Imatto-canna
Imatto-canna (also written Imatto canna or Jamatto canna) is a nonexistent Japanese syllabary reported by the German traveller Engelbert Kaempfer in his book Amoenitatum exoticarum politico-physico-me...
Imatto-canna - Wikipedia
Hokke-ji
Hokke-ji (法華寺, Hokke-ji), is a Buddhist temple located in the city of Nara, Japan.Hokke-ji was built by Empress Kōmyō in 745, originally as a nunnery temple on the grounds where previously her...
Hokke-ji - Wikipedia
Heijō-kyō
Heijō-kyō (平城京, also Heizei-kyō, sometimes Nara no miyako), was the capital city of Japan during most of the Nara period, from 710–40 and again from 745–84. The imperial palace is a listed UNESCO Wor...
Heijō-kyō - Wikipedia
Sokuon
The sokuon (促音) is a Japanese symbol in the form of a small hiragana or katakana tsu. In less formal language it is called chiisai tsu (小さいつ) or chiisana tsu (小さなつ), meaning "little tsu". ...
Emishi
The Emishi or Ebisu (蝦夷) constituted a group of people who lived in northeastern Honshū in the Tōhoku region which was referred to as michi no oku (道の奥) in contemporary sources. The origin of ...
Emishi - Wikipedia
Treaty of Versailles
The Treaty of Versailles (French: Traité de Versailles) was one of the peace treaties at the end of World War I. It ended the state of war between Germany and the Allied Powers. It was signed on 28 Ju...
Treaty of Versailles - Wikipedia
Naniwa-kyō
Naniwa-kyō (難波京) is a historical Japanese capital city, which was located in present-day central Osaka city.Traces of ancient palaces in Naniwa were found in 1957. Through more recent excavations,...
Naniwa-kyō - Wikipedia
Buddhism in Japan
Buddhism has been practiced in Japan since at least 552 AD, though some Chinese sources place the first spreading of the religion earlier during the Kofun period (250 to 538). Buddhism has had a major...
Buddhism in Japan - Wikipedia
Kamikaze
The Kamikaze (神風, [kamikaꜜze]; "Divine" or "spirit wind"), officially Tokubetsu Kōgekitai (特別攻撃隊, "Special Attack Unit"), abbreviated as Tokkō Tai (特攻隊), and used as a verb as Tokkō...
Fujiwara no Muchimaro
Fujiwara no Muchimaro (藤原 武智麻呂, 680 – August 29, 737) was a Japanese courtier (kuge) and politician of the early-Nara period.The eldest son of Fujiwara no Fuhito, he founded the Nanke ("Southern")...
Fujiwara no Muchimaro - Wikipedia