Neo-Assyrian Empire
The Neo-Assyrian Empire was an empire in Mesopotamian history which began in 911 BC and ended in 609 BC. During this period, Assyria assumed a position as the most powerful state on Earth, successfull...
Neo-Assyrian Empire - Wikipedia
Tiglath-Pileser III
Tiglath-Pileser III (from the Hebraic form of Akkadian: Tukultī-apil-Ešarra, "my trust is in the son of Esharra") was a prominent king of Assyria in the eighth century BCE (ruled 745–727 BC...
Tiglath-Pileser III - Wikipedia
Assyrian art and architecture
The architecture of Mesopotamian is the ancient architecture of the region of the Tigris–Euphrates river system (also known as Mesopotamia), encompassing several distinct cultures and spanning a perio...
Assyrian art and architecture - Wikipedia
Ancient Assyrian religion
Mesopotamian religion refers to the religious beliefs and practices followed by the Sumerian and East Semitic Akkadian, Assyrian, Babylonian and later migrant Arameans and Chaldeans, living in Mesopot...
Ancient Assyrian religion - Wikipedia
Nimrud ivories
The Nimrud ivories are carved ivory plaques and figures dating from the 9th to the 7th centuries BC that were excavated from the Assyrian city of Nimrud (in modern Ninawa in Iraq) during the 19th and ...
Nimrud ivories - Wikipedia
Black Obelisk of Shalmaneser III
The Black Obelisk of Shalmaneser III is a black limestone Neo-Assyrian bas-relief sculpture from Nimrud (ancient Kalhu), in northern Iraq, commemorating the deeds of King Shalmaneser III (reigned 858-...
Black Obelisk of Shalmaneser III - Wikipedia
Bucket and cone
Bucket and Cone refer to twin attributes that are frequently held in the hands of various genies depicted in Neo-Assyrian art (and especially palace reliefs) - sometimes, however, only the bucket is h...
Bucket and cone - Wikipedia
White Obelisk of Ashurnasirpal I
The White Obelisk of Ashurnasirpal I is a large stone monolith found at the ancient Assyrian settlement of Nineveh, northern Iraq. Excavated by the British archaeologist Hormuzd Rassam in 1853, it is ...
White Obelisk of Ashurnasirpal I - Wikipedia
Rakhlah
Rakhlah (Arabic: رخلة‎; also spelled Rakhleh or Rakleh), previously known as Zenopolis, is a village situated 31 kilometres (19 mi) west of Damascus, Syria. According to the Syria Centr...
Rakhlah - Wikipedia
Winged genie
Winged Genii is the conventional term for a recurring motif in Assyrian iconography.Winged genies are usually bearded male figures sporting birds' wings. The Genii are a reappearing trait in ancient ...
Winged genie - Wikipedia
Panbabylonism
Panbabylonism is a school of thought within Assyriology and Religious studies that considers the Hebrew Bible and Judaism as directly derived from Mesopotamian (Babylonian) mythology. Appearing in the...
Panbabylonism - Wikipedia
Assyrian statue (BM 124963)
The Assyrian statue (British Museum number 124963) was originally set up in the temple of Ishtar in Nineveh (near the modern city of Mosul in northern Iraq). The statue remains the only known Assyrian...
Assyrian statue (BM 124963) - Wikipedia
Art of Mesopotamia
The art of Mesopotamia has survived in the archaeological record from early hunter-gatherer societies (10th millennium BC) on to the Bronze Age cultures of the Sumerian, Akkadian, Babylonian and Assyr...
Art of Mesopotamia - Wikipedia
Architecture of Mesopotamia
The architecture of Mesopotamian is the ancient architecture of the region of the Tigris–Euphrates river system (also known as Mesopotamia), encompassing several distinct cultures and spanning a perio...
Architecture of Mesopotamia - Wikipedia
Urban history
Urban history is a field of history that examines the historical nature of cities and towns, and the process of urbanization. The approach is often multidisciplinary, crossing boundaries into fields l...
Shikaft-e Gulgul
Shikaft-e Gulgul (or Gulgulcave) site is an Assyria rock relief and inscription located in the vicinity of Gulgul, a village near Mount Pushta-e Kuh at Ilam in Iran. It was discovered by Louis Vande...
Shikaft-e Gulgul - Wikipedia