Æsir
In Old Norse, ǫ́ss (or áss, ás, plural æsir; feminine ásynja, plural ásynjur) is the term denoting a member of the principal pantheon in the indigenous Germanic religion known as Norse religion. This ...
Æsir - Wikipedia
Valkyrie
In Norse mythology, a valkyrie (from Old Norse valkyrja "chooser of the slain") is one of a host of female figures who choose those who may die in battle and those who may live. Selecting among half o...
Valkyrie - Wikipedia
Brynhildr
Brynhildr (also spelled Brunhild, Brünnhilde, Brynhild) is a shieldmaiden and a valkyrie in Germanic mythology, where she appears as a main character in the Völsunga saga and some Eddic poems treating...
Brynhildr - Wikipedia
Sigrún
Sigrún (Old Norse "victory rune") is a valkyrie in Norse mythology. Her story is related in Helgakviða Hundingsbana I and Helgakviða Hundingsbana II, in the Poetic Edda. The original editor annotated ...
Sigrún - Wikipedia
Sif
In Norse mythology, Sif is a goddess associated with earth. Sif is attested in the Poetic Edda, compiled in the 13th century from earlier traditional sources, and the Prose Edda, written in the 13th c...
Sif - Wikipedia
Þrúðr
Þrúðr (Old Norse "strength"), sometimes anglicized as Thrúd or Thrud, is a daughter of the major god Thor in Norse mythology. Þrúðr is also the name of one of the valkyries who serve ale to the einher...
Þrúðr - Wikipedia
Odin
In Germanic mythology, Odin (from Old Norse Óðinn) is a widely attested god. In Old Norse sources, where most surviving information about the god stems, Odin is associated with healing, death, royalty...
Odin - Wikipedia
Kára
In Norse mythology, Kára is a valkyrie. Kára is attested in the prose epilogue of the Poetic Edda poem Helgakviða Hundingsbana II. The epilogue details that "there was a belief in the pagan religion, ...
Urðr
Urðr (Old Norse "fate") is one of the Norns in Norse mythology. Along with Verðandi (possibly "happening" or "present") and Skuld (possibly "debt" or "future"), Urðr makes up a trio of Norns that are ...
Norns
The Norns (Old Norse: norn, plural: nornir) in Norse mythology are female beings who rule the destiny of gods and men, possibly a kind of dísir (see below), and comparable to the Moirai (also called "...
Norns - Wikipedia
Runic inscription N 351 M
N 351 is the Rundata catalog number for a medieval runic inscription carved on a piece of wood that was found at the north portal of the Borgund stave church in Norway.
This runic inscription stat...
Runic inscription N 351 M - Wikipedia
Eir
In Norse mythology, Eir (Old Norse "help, mercy") is a goddess and/or valkyrie associated with medical skill. Eir is attested in the Poetic Edda, compiled in the 13th century from earlier traditional ...
Eir - Wikipedia
Bragi
Bragi is the skaldic god of poetry in Norse mythology.
Bragi is generally associated with bragr, the Norse word for poetry. The name of the god may have been derived from bragr, or the term bragr...
Bragi - Wikipedia
Þorgerðr Hölgabrúðr and Irpa
In Norse mythology, Þorgerðr Hǫlgabrúðr and Irpa are female æsir, divine figures. Þorgerðr and Irpa appear together in Jómsvíkinga saga, Njáls saga and Þorleifs þáttr jarlsskálds. Irpa does not appear...
Þorgerðr Hölgabrúðr and Irpa - Wikipedia
Female spirits in Germanic paganism
In Norse mythology, a dís ("lady", plural dísir) is a ghost, spirit or deity associated with fate who can be both benevolent and antagonistic towards mortal people. Dísir may act as protective spirits...
Female spirits in Germanic paganism - Wikipedia
Óðr
In Norse mythology, Óðr (Old Norse for the "Divine Madness, frantic, furious, vehement, eager", as a noun "mind, feeling" and also "song, poetry"; Orchard (1997) gives "the frenzied one") or Óð, somet...
Óðr - Wikipedia
Almáttki áss
Hinn almáttki áss (the almighty áss "god") is an unknown Norse divinity evoked in an Icelandic legal oath sworn on a temple ring. This oath is especially mentioned in Landnámabók (Hauksbók 268):
T...
Landdísir
In Norse mythology and later Icelandic folklore, landdísir (Old Norse "dísir of the land") are beings who live in landdísasteinar, specific stones located in Northwestern Iceland which were treated wi...
Jörð
In Norse mythology, Jörð (Icelandic "earth", pronounced [ˈjœrð] and from Old Norse jǫrð, pronounced [ˈjɔrð], sometimes Anglicized as Jord or Jorth; also called Jarð, [jɑrð] as in Old East Norse), is a...
Jörð - Wikipedia
Sváfa
In Norse mythology, Sváfa or Sváva is a valkyrie and the daughter of king Eylimi. Consequently she was probably the maternal aunt of Sigurd, the dragon slayer, although this is not explicitly mentione...
Sváfa - Wikipedia
Verðandi
In Norse mythology, Verðandi (Old Norse, meaning possibly "happening" or "present"), sometimes anglicized as Verdandi or Verthandi, is one of the norns. Along with Urðr (Old Norse "fate") and Skuld (p...
Verðandi - Wikipedia
Thor
In Norse mythology, Thor (/θɔr/; from Old Norse Þórr) is a hammer-wielding god associated with thunder, lightning, storms, oak trees, strength, the protection of mankind, and also hallowing, healing a...
Thor - Wikipedia
Baldr
Baldr (also Balder, Baldur) is a god of light and purity in Norse mythology, and a son of the god Odin and the goddess Frigg. He has numerous brothers, such as Thor and Váli.In the 12th century, Danis...
Baldr - Wikipedia
Frigg and Freyja origin hypothesis
Some scholars hypothesize that both Frigg and Freyja may have their origin in a Common Germanic goddess. There is no firm evidence for this, but scholars have found some similarities both in their myt...
Frigg and Freyja origin hypothesis - Wikipedia
List of valkyrie names in Norse mythology
In Norse mythology, a valkyrie (from Old Norse valkyrja "chooser of the slain") is one of a host of female viking-like figures who decide who will die in battle. Selecting among half of those who die ...
List of valkyrie names in Norse mythology - Wikipedia
Týr
Týr (/ˈtɪr/; Old Norse: Týr [tyːr]) is a god associated with law and heroic glory in Norse mythology, portrayed as one-handed. Corresponding names in other Germanic languages are Gothic Teiws, Old Eng...
Týr - Wikipedia
Hel (being)
In Norse mythology, Hel is a being who presides over a realm of the same name, where she receives a portion of the dead. Hel is attested in the Poetic Edda, compiled in the 13th century from earlier t...
Hel (being) - Wikipedia
Rán
In Norse mythology, Rán (Old Norse "sea" or "robber") is a sea goddess. According to Snorri Sturluson's Prose Edda book Skáldskaparmál, in his retelling of the Poetic Edda poem Lokasenna, she is marri...
Rán - Wikipedia
Sigrdrífumál
Sigrdrífumál ("sayings of the victory-bringer", also known as Brynhildarljóð) is the conventional title given to a section of the Poetic Edda text in Codex Regius.It follows Fáfnismál without interru...
Sigrdrífumál - Wikipedia
Dís
In Norse mythology, a dís ("lady", plural dísir) is a ghost, spirit or deity associated with fate who can be both benevolent and antagonistic towards mortal people. Dísir may act as protective spirits...
Dís - Wikipedia