Gordion Furniture and Wooden Artifacts
A spectacular collection of furniture and wooden artifacts was excavated by the University of Pennsylvania at the site of Gordion (Latin: Gordium), the capital of the ancient kingdom of Phrygia in the...
Gordion Furniture and Wooden Artifacts - Wikipedia
Dares Phrygius
Dares Phrygius (Ancient Greek: Δάρης, Dárēs; Middle Welsh: Dared), according to Homer, was a Trojan priest of Hephaestus. He was supposed to have been the author of an account of the destruct...
Midas
Midas (/ˈmaɪdəs/; Greek: Μίδας) is the name of at least three members of the royal house of Phrygia.The most famous King Midas is popularly remembered in Greek mythology for his ability to turn everyt...
Midas - Wikipedia
Dorieium
Dorieium (Greek: Δορίειον) was an ancient city of Asia Minor. Stephanus of Byzantium mentions it as a city of Phrygia. He has also Darieium, a city of Phrygia, which some suppose may be the same place...
Synnada
Synnada (Greek: Σύνναδα) was an ancient town of Phrygia Salutaris in Asia Minor. Its site is now occupied by the modern Turkish town of Şuhut, in Afyonkarahisar Province.
Synnada was situated in t...
Synnada - Wikipedia
Tripolis (Phrygia)
Tripolis on the Meander (Greek: Τρίπολις, Eth. Τριπολίτης, Latin: Tripolis ad Maeandrum) – also Neapolis, Apollonia, and Antoninopolis – was an ancient city on the borders of Phryg...
Tripolis (Phrygia) - Wikipedia
Mossyna
Mossyna was a city of the middle Maeander valley in the late Roman province Phrygia Pacatiana II. It may have been named for the classical Mossynoeci.Mossyna became a Byzantine bishopric, located betw...
Phrygia
In antiquity, Phrygia (/ˈfrɪdʒiə/; Greek: Φρυγία, [pʰryɡía], Turkish: Frigya) was a kingdom in the west central part of Anatolia, in what is now Turkey, centered on the Sakarya River.The Phryg...
Phrygia - Wikipedia
Tantalus
Tantalus (Ancient Greek: Τάνταλος, Tántalos) was a Greek mythological figure, most famous for his eternal punishment in Tartarus. He was made to stand in a pool of water beneath a fruit tree wit...
Tantalus - Wikipedia
Motella
Motella, Metello(u)polis, or Pulcherianopolis was a city in the Roman province of Phrygia Pacatiana, in Asia Minor, probably on the site of the modern Medele.Inscriptions make known a Phrygian town na...
Dindymon
In Greek mythology, Dindymon (Ancient Greek: Δίνδυμον), was a mountain in eastern Phrygia (today's Murat Dağı of Gediz), later part of Galatia, that was later called Agdistis, sacred to the "moun...
Büyük Menderes River
The Büyük Menderes River (historically the Maeander or Meander, from Ancient Greek: Μαίανδρος, Maíandros; Turkish: Büyük Menderes Irmağı), is a river in southwestern Turkey. It rises in west cent...
Büyük Menderes River - Wikipedia
Artabazos II of Phrygia
Artabazus (in Greek Αρτάβαζος) (fl. 389 BC – 329 BC) was a Persian general and satrap. He was the son of the Persian satrap of Phrygia, Pharnabazus, and younger kinsman (brother or rather neph...
Phrygian type helmet
The Phrygian helmet, also known as the Thracian helmet, was a type of helmet that originated in Classical Greece and was widely used in Thrace, Dacia, Magna Graecia and the Hellenistic world until w...
Phrygian type helmet - Wikipedia
Lycus (river of Phrygia)
Lycus or Lykos (Greek: Λύκος; Turkish: Çürüksu) was the name of a river in ancient Phrygia, a tributary of the Maeander, which it joins a few km south of Tripolis. It had its sources in the easter...
Traianopolis (Phrygia)
Traianopolis, Trajanopolis, Tranopolis, or Tranupolis (Greek: Τραϊανούπολις) was a Roman and Byzantine city in Phrygia Pacatiana Prima.Trajanopolis has been variously identified; Radet locates it ...
Traianopolis (Phrygia) - Wikipedia
Marsyas
In Greek mythology, the satyr Marsyas (/ˈmɑrsiəs/; Greek: Μαρσύας) is a central figure in two stories involving death: in one, he picked up the double flute (aulos) that had been abandoned by Athena ...
Marsyas - Wikipedia
Kerkenes
Kerkenes (or Kerkenes Dağ; both names are modern) is the largest pre-Hellenistic site from the Anatolian Plateau (Turkey) – 7 km (4 mi) of strong stone defenses, pierced by seven gates...
Montanism
Montanism, known by its adherents as the New Prophecy, was an early Christian movement of the late 2nd century, later referred to by the name of its founder, Montanus. Although it came to be labelled...
Polybotus
Polybotus or Polybotos (Greek: Πολύβοτος), modern Bolvadin, Turkey, was a city in the Roman province of Phrygia Salutaris. The city's bishop was a suffragan of Synnada.
This town is mentioned ...
Pelops
In Greek mythology, Pelops (/ˈpiːlɒps, ˈpɛlɒps/; Greek: Πέλοψ), was king of Pisa in the Peloponnesus. His father, Tantalus, was the founder of the House of Atreus through Pelops's son of that name.He ...
Pelops - Wikipedia
Hellespontine Phrygia
Dascylium (Greek: Δασκύλιον, Δασκυλεῖον) was a town in Anatolia some 30 kilometres inland from the coast of the Propontis, at modern Ergili, Turkey. Its site was rediscovered in 1952 and has since...
Dymas
In Greek mythology, Dymas is the name attributed to at least four individuals.
The first Dymas was a Phrygian king and father of Hecuba (also called Hecabe), wife to King Priam of Troy. King Dymas...
Anatolic Theme
The Anatolic Theme (Greek: Άνατολικόν [θέμα], Anatolikon [thema]), more properly known as the Theme of the Anatolics (Greek: θέμα Άνατολικῶν, thema Anatolikōn) was a Byzantine theme (a military-ci...
Anatolic Theme - Wikipedia
Darieium
Darieium (Greek: Δαρίειον) was an ancient city of Asia Minor. Stephanus of Byzantium mentions it as a city of Phrygia. He has also Dorieium, a city of Phrygia, which some suppose may be the same place...
Sangarius (mythology)
Sangarius (/sæŋˈɡɛriəs/; Ancient Greek: Σαγγάριος) was a Phrygian river-god of Greek mythology. He is described as the son of Oceanus and Tethys and as the husband of Metope, by whom he became t...