Religion in the Soviet Union
When the Soviet Union was established by the Bolsheviks in 1922, it was the constitutional organization which took over from the Russian Empire. At the time of the 1917 Revolution, the Russian Orthodo...
Religion in the Soviet Union - Wikipedia
History of Christianity in Ukraine
The History of Christianity in what is currently Ukraine is traditionally believed to date back to the early centuries of the apostolic church. It has remained the dominant religion in the territory s...
History of Christianity in Ukraine - Wikipedia
History of the Jews in the Soviet Union
The history of the Jews in the Soviet Union is primarily the history of Jews in its component states.The history of the Jews in Armenia dates back more than 2,000 years. After Eastern Armenia came und...
Islam in the Soviet Union
The Soviet Union was a state comprising fifteen communist republics which existed from 1922 until its dissolution into a series of separate nation states in 1991. Of these fifteen republics, six had ...
Islam in the Soviet Union - Wikipedia
Living Church
The Living Church (Russian: Живая Церковь), also called Renovationist Church (обновленческая церковь) or Renovationism (обновленчество; from обновление ‘renovation, renewal’; official name Orthod...
History of the Jews in Russia and the Soviet Union
The history of the Jews in the Soviet Union is primarily the history of Jews in its component states.The history of the Jews in Armenia dates back more than 2,000 years. After Eastern Armenia came und...
Persecution of Christians in the Soviet Union
Throughout the history of the Soviet Union (1922-1991), Soviet authorities suppressed and persecuted various forms of Christianity to different extents depending on the particular era. Soviet policy,...
Persecution of Christians in the Soviet Union - Wikipedia
Religion in Abkhazia
Most inhabitants of Abkhazia are Orthodox Christians, with a minority adhering to Islam. The influence of the traditional Abkhaz religion also remains strong and has been experiencing a revival in rec...
Religion in Abkhazia - Wikipedia
Religion in Armenia
Up to 95% of Armenians follow Christianity. Armenia has its own church, the Armenian Apostolic Church, which most Armenians follow. It was founded in the 1st century AD, and in 301 AD became the first...
Religion in Armenia - Wikipedia
Religion in Azerbaijan
Religion in Azerbaijan comprises different religious trends spread among the people and ethnic groups residing in the country. There are several confessions in Azerbaijan.Approximately 93.4% of the po...
Religion in Azerbaijan - Wikipedia
Religion in Belarus
Before 1917 Belarus had 2,466 religious communities, including 1,650 Orthodox, 127 Roman Catholic, 657 Jewish, 32 Protestant, and several Muslim communities. Under the communists (who were officially ...
Religion in Georgia (country)
The wide variety of peoples inhabiting Georgia has meant a correspondingly rich array of active religions. Today most of the population in Georgia practices Orthodoxy, primarily in the Georgian Orthod...
Religion in Georgia (country) - Wikipedia
Religion in Kazakhstan
The majority Kazakhstan's citizens are Sunni of the Hanafi school, traditionally including ethnic Kazakhs, who constitute about 63.6% of the population, as well as by ethnic Uzbeks, Uighurs, and Tatar...
Religion in Kazakhstan - Wikipedia
Religion in Kyrgyzstan
The Constitution and the law provide for freedom of religion in Kyrgyzstan, and the Government generally respected this right in practice; however, the Government restricted the activities of radical ...
Religion in Latvia
The main religion traditionally practiced in Latvia is Christianity. Lutheranism is the main Christian denomination among ethnic Latvians due to strong historical links with the Nordic countries and N...
Religion in Latvia - Wikipedia
Religion in Lithuania
As per the 2011 census, the predominant religion in Lithuania is Christianity, with the largest confession being Roman Catholicism. Lithuania was the last pagan country in Europe, with the Roman Catho...
Religion in Lithuania - Wikipedia
Religion in Moldova
Religion in Moldova is separate from the state in that it is much different from any other state religion in Western Europe. The Constitution of the Republic of Moldova provides for freedom of religio...
Religion in Moldova - Wikipedia
Religion in Russia
Religion in Russia is diverse, with a 1997 law naming Christianity, Islam, Buddhism, and Judaism as important in Russian history. Orthodox Christianity (Russian: Православие Pravoslaviye) is Russia's...
Religion in Russia - Wikipedia
Religion in Tajikistan
Islam, the predominant religion throughout Central Asia, was brought to the region by the Arabs in the 7th century. Since that time, Islam has become an integral part of Tajik culture. The Hanafi scho...
Religion in Tajikistan - Wikipedia
Religion in Turkmenistan
The Turkmen of Turkmenistan, like their kin in Uzbekistan, Afghanistan, and Iran are Muslims. According to the CIA World Factbook, Turkmenistan is 89% Muslim and 10% Eastern Orthodox. Most ethnic Ru...
Religion in Turkmenistan - Wikipedia
Religion in Ukraine
Ukraine in religious geography lies on the boundaries separating Roman Catholic, Eastern Orthodox and Islamic spheres of influence. Traces of the cultural influence of Catholic Lithuania and Poland, o...
Religion in Ukraine - Wikipedia
Religion in Uzbekistan
Islam is by far the majority religion in Uzbekistan with a 96.3% Muslim population, in 2009.
There are more Sunnite than Shi'ite Muslims among the residents. Islam was brought to ancestors of mo...
Religion in Uzbekistan - Wikipedia
Hryhorij Lakota
The Blessed Hryhorij Lakota was a Ukrainian Greek-Catholic Church auxiliary bishop who suffered religious persecution and was martyred by the Soviet Government.Hryhorij Lakota was born 31 January 1893...
Hryhorij Lakota - Wikipedia
Soviet anti-religious legislation
The government of the Soviet Union followed an unofficial policy of state atheism, aiming to gradually eliminate religious belief within its borders and to replace it with atheism. While it never off...
Soviet anti-religious legislation - Wikipedia