Roman architecture
Ancient Roman architecture developed different aspects of Ancient Greek architecture and newer technologies such as the arch and the dome to create a new architectural style. Roman architecture flouri...
Roman architecture - Wikipedia
Meet The New Young Hollywood — 30 Stars Under 30 Whose Careers Are Blowing Up
Each year, new and talented young actors and actresses rise to the top of the competitive world of Hollywood. Some of these fresh faces will land coveted roles, turn studio projects into box office hi...
15 Airports You'll Actually Want To Have A Long Layover In
Having a long layover while waiting for your next flight at the airport is often an unpleasant experience, but some airports are adding a variety of entertainment features to make your wait as enjoyab...
The Colossal Head of Decebalus, King of the Dacians
In the heart of Rome stands a 38m tall column built in the 2nd century A.D. Carved in low relief spiralling around the monument are over 2600 figures, representing the combatants of wars fought in a d...
Trajan's Column - Reading an Ancient Comic Strip
The victory of the Roman emperor Trajan over the Dacians in back-to-back wars is carved in numerous scenes that spiral up around a 126-foot marble pillar in Rome known as Trajan's Column. It's a tale ...
Colosseum Interactive Virtual Tour
Inside Roman Colosseum in Rome Interactive Virtual Tour as if you were there. 360 panorama and virtual tour.
Roman architecture - Video
http://www.TylerCapehart.com/ Roman Architecture Savannah College of Art and Design Tyler Capehart Apocalypse Productions Become a Fan on Facebook! http://ww...
Roman roads - History Channel documentary
A look at how Roman roads were constructed and how they tied together a growing empire.
Colosseum
Discover the engineering secrets behind Rome's Colosseum. Engineering the Impossible: The Colosseum : SUN JUNE 24 9P et/pt http://channel.nationalgeographic....
Basilica
St Peter's from crypt to dome segment of Gondola With the Wind, a free Intrepid Berkeley Explorer video that begins in Italy with Rome, Pisa, Florence, and...
Roman architecture
The Architecture of Ancient Rome adopted the external Greek architecture for their own purposes, which were so different from Greek buildings as to create a ...
Concrete Revolution
The Roman Architectural Revolution, also known as the concrete Revolution, was the widespread use in Roman architecture of the previously little-used architectural forms of the arch, vault, and dome. ...
Amphitheatre
An amphitheatre or amphitheater /ˈæmfɨˌθiːətər/ is an open-air venue used for entertainment, performances, and sports. The term derives from the ancient Greek ἀμφιθέατρον (amphitheatron), from ἀμφί (a...
Amphitheatre - Wikipedia
Basilica
The Latin word basilica (derived from Greek βασιλικὴ στοά, Royal Stoa, the tribunal chamber of a king), has three distinct applications in modern English. The word was originally used to describe an ...
Basilica - Wikipedia
Domus
In ancient Rome, the domus (plural domūs, genitive domūs or domī) was the type of house occupied by the upper classes and some wealthy freedmen during the Republican and Imperial eras. It could be fo...
Domus - Wikipedia
Forum (Roman)
A forum (Latin forum "public place outdoors", plural fora; English plural either fora or forums) was a public square in a Roman municipium, or any civitas, reserved primarily for the vending of good...
Forum (Roman) - Wikipedia
Insulae
In Roman architecture, an insula (Latin for "island," plural insulae) was a kind of apartment building that housed most of the urban citizen population of ancient Rome, including ordinary people of lo...
Insulae - Wikipedia
Roman aqueduct
The Romans constructed numerous aqueducts in order to bring water from distant sources into their cities and towns, supplying public baths, latrines, fountains and private households. Waste water was ...
Roman aqueduct - Wikipedia
Roman bridge
Roman bridges, built by ancient Romans, were the first large and lasting bridges built. Roman bridges were built with stone and had the arch as the basic structure (see arch bridge). Most utilized con...
Roman bridge - Wikipedia
Roman lighthouse
The history of lighthouses refers to the development of the use of towers, buildings, or other types of structure, as an aid to navigation for maritime pilots at sea or on inland waterways.
Before...
Roman lighthouse - Wikipedia
Roman roads
Roman roads (Latin: viae; singular: via) were physical infrastructure vital to the maintenance and development of the Roman state, and were built from about 500 BC through the expansion and consolidat...
Roman roads - Wikipedia
Roman theatre
Roman theatre may refer to:
Roman villa
Roman villa is a term used to describe a Roman country house built for the upper class during the Roman republic and the Roman Empire.
According to Pliny the Elder, there were two kinds of villas:...
Roman villa - Wikipedia
Temple (Roman)
Ancient Roman temples are among the most visible archaeological remains of Roman culture, and are a significant source for Roman architecture. Their construction and maintenance was a major part of a...
Temple (Roman) - Wikipedia
Thermae
In ancient Rome, thermae (from Greek θερμός thermos, "hot") and balneae (from Greek βαλανεῖον balaneion) were facilities for bathing. Thermae usually refers to the large imperial bath complexes, while...
Thermae - Wikipedia
Triumphal arch
A triumphal arch is a monumental structure in the shape of an archway with one or more arched passageways, often designed to span a road. In its simplest form a triumphal arch consists of two massive ...
Triumphal arch - Wikipedia
Roman engineering
Romans are famous for their advanced engineering accomplishments, although some of their own inventions were improvements on older ideas, concepts and inventions. Technology for bringing running water...
Roman engineering - Wikipedia
Alyscamps
The Alyscamps is a large Roman necropolis, which is a short distance outside the walls of the old town of Arles, France. It was one of the most famous necropolises of the ancient world. The name comes...
Alyscamps - Wikipedia
Antonine Wall
The Antonine Wall is a stone and turf fortification built by the Romans across what is now the Central Belt of Scotland, between the Firth of Forth and the Firth of Clyde. Representing the northernmos...
Antonine Wall - Wikipedia