Roman law
Roman law is the legal system of ancient Rome, including Roman Military Jurisdiction and the legal developments spanning over a thousand years of jurisprudence, from the 12 Tables (c. 449 BC), to the ...
Roman law - Wikipedia
The real story behind the assassination of Julius Caesar
On Feb. 15, in the year 44 BC, Julius Caesar, the all-powerful ruler of Rome, visited a soothsayer named Spurinna, who “predicted the future by examining the internal organs of sacrificial animals,” a...
Basilica
St Peter's from crypt to dome segment of Gondola With the Wind, a free Intrepid Berkeley Explorer video that begins in Italy with Rome, Pisa, Florence, and...
Lex Canuleia
The Lex Canuleia is a law of the Roman Republic passed in the year 445 BC.Named after the tribune Gaius Canuleius, who proposed it, it abolished a corresponding prohibition in the Twelve Tables and al...
Lex Hortensia
Lex Hortensia was a law passed in Ancient Rome in 287 BC which made all resolutions passed by plebeians binding on all citizens.
In Roman law, Lex Hortensia (284 BC) was the final result of the lo...
Lex Aquilia
The lex Aquilia was a Roman law which provided compensation to the owners of property injured by someone's fault.
The lex Aquilia (strictly, a plebiscite) was possibly enacted in 286 BC, or at som...
Gaius (jurist)
Gaius (floruit AD 130–180) was a celebrated Roman jurist. Scholars know very little of his personal life. It is impossible to discover even his full name, Gaius or Caius being merely his personal name...
Gaius (jurist) - Wikipedia
Ulpian
Ulpian (/ˈʌlpiən/; Latin: Gnaeus Domitius Annius Ulpianus; c. 170 – 223) was a Roman jurist of Tyrian ancestry.
The exact time and place of his birth are unknown, but the period of his litera...
Aemilius Papinianus
Aemilius Papinianus (142–212), also known as Papinian, was a celebrated Roman jurist, magister libellorum, attorney general (advocatus fisci) and, after the death of Gaius Fulvius Plautianus in ...
Julius Paulus Prudentissimus
Julius Paulus Prudentissimus (Greek: Ἰούλιος Παῦλος; fl. 2nd century and 3rd century AD) was one of the most influential and distinguished Roman jurists. He was also a praetorian prefect under th...
Herennius Modestinus
Herennius Modestinus, or simply Modestinus, was a celebrated Roman jurist, a student of Ulpian who flourished about 250 AD.He appears to have been a native of one of the Greek-speaking provinces, prob...
Ius publicum
Ius publicum is Latin for public law. It is to protect the interests of the Roman state (while ius privatum (private law) concerned relations between individuals).Public law will only include some are...
Res publica
Res publica is a Latin phrase, loosely meaning ‘public affair’. It is the root of the word ‘republic’, and the word ‘commonwealth’ has traditionally been used as a synonym for it; however translations...
Ius privatum
Ius privatum is Latin for private law. Contrasted with ius publicum (the laws relating to the state), ius privatum regulated the relations between individuals. In Roman law this included personal, pro...
Rei vindicatio
Rei vindicatio is a legal action by which the plaintiff demands that the defendant return a thing that belongs to the plaintiff. It may only be used when plaintiff owns the thing, and the defendant i...
Status in Roman legal system
In Roman law, status describes a person's legal status. The individual could be a Roman citizen (status civitatis), unlike foreigners; or he could be free (status libertatis), unlike slaves; or he co...
Roman litigation
The history of Roman Law can be divided into three systems of procedure: that of legis actiones, the formulary system, and cognitio extraordinarem. The periods in which these systems were in use overl...
Corpus Juris Civilis
The Corpus Juris (or Iuris) Civilis ("Body of Civil Law") is the modern name for a collection of fundamental works in jurisprudence, issued from 529 to 534 by order of Justinian I, Eastern Roman Empe...
Corpus Juris Civilis - Wikipedia
Byzantine law
Byzantine Law was essentially a continuation of Roman Law with Christian influence; however, this is not to doubt its later influence on the western practice of jurisprudence. Byzantine Law was effect...
Byzantine law - Wikipedia
Early Germanic law
Several Latin law codes of the Germanic peoples written in the Early Middle Ages (also known as leges barbarorum "laws of the barbarians") survive, dating to between the 5th and 9th centuries. They a...
Anglo-Saxon law
Anglo-Saxon law (Old English ǣ, later lagu "law"; dōm "decree, judgement") is a body of written rules and customs that were in place during the Anglo-Saxon period in England, before the Norman conques...
Medieval Roman law
Medieval Roman law is the continuation and development of ancient Roman law that developed in the European Late Middle Ages. Based on the ancient text of Roman law, the Corpus iuris civilis, it added ...
Roman citizenship
Citizenship in ancient Rome was a privileged political and legal status afforded to unenslaved individuals with respect to laws, property, and governance.In the Roman Republic and later in the Roman E...
Roman citizenship - Wikipedia
The real story behind the assassination of Julius Caesar
On Feb. 15, in the year 44 BC, Julius Caesar, the all-powerful ruler of Rome, visited a soothsayer named Spurinna, who “predicted the future by examining the internal organs of sacrificial animals,” a...
Lex Caecilia Didia
The Lex Caecilia Didia was a law put into effect by the consuls Q. Caecilius Metellus Nepos and Titus Didius in the year 98 BCE. This law had two provisions. The first was a minimum period between pro...