Archaeology of Denmark
The Archaeology of Denmark is important for the science of archaeology as a whole for several reasons. For one thing, the history and prehistory of the area, presents an extraordinary rich and varied ...
Pre-Roman Iron Age
The Pre-Roman Iron Age of Northern Europe (5th/4th - 1st century BC) was the earliest part of the Iron Age in Scandinavia, northern Germany, and the Netherlands north of the Rhine River. These region...
Pre-Roman Iron Age - Wikipedia
Scandinavian prehistory
Scandinavian prehistory began when the Scandinavian peninsula, formerly entirely covered by thick ice, became free of ice at the end of the last ice age, c. 11,000 BC. At that time, a hunter gatherer ...
Scandinavian prehistory - Wikipedia
Kragehul I
Kragehul I (DR 196 U) is a migration period lance-shaft found on Funen, Denmark. It is now in the collection of the National Museum of Denmark, Copenhagen, Denmark. The spear shaft was found in 1877 d...
Kragehul I - Wikipedia
Lofotr Viking Museum
The Lofotr Viking Museum (Lofotr Vikingmuseum) is a historical museum based on a reconstruction and archaeological excavation of a Viking chieftain's village on the island of Vestvågøya in the Lofoten...
Lofotr Viking Museum - Wikipedia
Weerdinge Men
The Weerdinge men    [ 'ʋeɪrdɪŋə ] were two naked bog bodies found in Drenthe, the Netherlands, in the southern part of Bourtanger Moor in 1904. Radiocarbon dating shows that the two l...
Mästermyr chest
The Mästermyr chest is an important Viking-era artefact from Sweden.It is a chest containing Viking-era blacksmithing and woodworking tools, found in Gotland, Sweden. The chest also contains several p...
Haraldskær Woman
The Haraldskær Woman (or Haraldskjaer Woman) is a bog body of a woman found naturally preserved in a bog in Jutland, Denmark, and dating from about 490 BCE (pre-Roman Iron Age). Workers found the body...
Haraldskær Woman - Wikipedia
Sculptured stones
Sculptured stones is a name applied to commemorative monuments of early Christian date found in various parts of the British Isles and Scandinavia.They are usually rough-hewn slabs or boulders, and in...
Sculptured stones - Wikipedia
Grauballe Man
The Grauballe Man is a bog body that was uncovered in 1952 from a peat bog near to the village of Grauballe in Jutland, Denmark. The body is that of a man dating from the late 3rd century BC, during t...
Grauballe Man - Wikipedia
Heathen hofs
Heathen hofs or Germanic pagan temples were the temple buildings of Germanic paganism; there are also a few built for use in modern Germanic neopaganism. The term hof is taken from Old Norse.
Etym...
Heathen hofs - Wikipedia
Ambrones
The Ambrones (Ancient Greek: Ἄμβρωνες) were an ancient tribe from Jutland that appeared briefly in the Roman sources relating to the 2nd century BC. In the late 2nd century BC, along with the fel...
Ertebølle culture
The Ertebølle culture (ca 5300 BC – 3950 BC) ([ˈæɐdəˌbølə]) is the name of a hunter-gatherer and fisher, pottery-making culture dating to the end of the Mesolithic period. The culture was concent...
Ertebølle culture - Wikipedia
Øvre Stabu spearhead
The Øvre Stabu spearhead is an iron spearhead which bears an Elder Futhark inscription dated to the second half of the 2nd century, making it one of the oldest runic inscriptions preserved.It was disc...
Bromme culture
The Bromme culture is a late Upper Paleolithic culture dated to c. 11 600 to 10 800 cal BC, which corresponds to the second half of the Allerød Oscillation. At this time, reindeer was the most importa...
Bromme culture - Wikipedia
Grooves (archaeology)
There are grooves (Swedish: sliprännor, slipskåror) carved into rock in many places in Europe, and some of them appear on the Baltic Sea island of Gotland. They are common in France, where they we...
Grooves (archaeology) - Wikipedia
Girl of the Uchter Moor
The Girl of the Uchter Moor also known as Moora is the name given to the female Iron Age bog body remains, discovered in 2000 in the marshland near Uchte, Germany. The remains include vertebrae, hair ...
Girl of the Uchter Moor - Wikipedia
Gundestrup cauldron
The Gundestrup cauldron is a richly decorated silver vessel, thought to date between 200 BC and 300 AD, placing it within the late La Tène period or early Roman Iron Age. The cauldron is the largest k...
Gundestrup cauldron - Wikipedia
Fosna-Hensbacka culture
The Fosna/Hensbacka (ca. 8300 BC - 7300 BC, or 12000 cal.BP - 10500 cal.BP), were two very similar Late Palaeolithic/early Mesolithic cultures in Scandinavia, and are often subsumed under the name Fos...
Fosna-Hensbacka culture - Wikipedia
Nøstvet and Lihult cultures
The Nøstvet culture (ca 6200 BC-3200 BC) and the Lihult culture are two very similar Mesolithic cultures in Scandinavian prehistory derived from the earlier Fosna-Hensbacka cultures. They are so varie...
Jotunheimen shoe
The Jotunheimen shoe is a leather shoe discovered in the Jotunheimen Mountains in eastern Norway. The shoe, discovered in August 2006, was originally dated to around 1000 CE, but subsequent testing re...
Jotunheimen shoe - Wikipedia
Bocksten Man
The Bocksten Man (Swedish: Bockstensmannen) (also spelled as Boxsten) is the remains of a medieval man's body found in a bog in Varberg Municipality, Sweden. It is one of the best-preserved finds ...
Bocksten Man - Wikipedia
Maglemosian culture
Maglemosian (ca. 9000 BC–6000 BC) is the name given to a culture of the early Mesolithic period in Northern Europe. In Scandinavia, the culture was succeeded by the Kongemose culture.The actual name o...
Maglemosian culture - Wikipedia