Schools of economic thought
Schools of economic thought describes the variety of approaches in the history of economic thought noteworthy enough to be described as a school of thought. While economists do not always fit into pa...
Ancient economic thought
In the history of economic thought, ancient economic thought refers to the ideas from people before the Middle Ages.Economics in the classical age is defined in the modern analysis as a factor of ethi...
Ancient economic thought - Wikipedia
Islamic economic jurisprudence
Islamic economic jurisprudence, also Islamic commercial jurisprudence, or fiqh al-mu'amalat, (Arabic: فقه ألمعملة‎) refers to the rules of financial transacting in a Shari'a compliant manner...
Islamic economics in the world
Islamic economics in practice, or economic policies supported by self-identified Islamic groups, has varied throughout its long history. Traditional Islamic concepts having to do with economics includ...
Scholasticism
Scholasticism is a method of critical thought which dominated teaching by the academics ("scholastics," or "schoolmen") of medieval universities in Europe from about 1100 to 1700, and a program of emp...
Scholasticism - Wikipedia
Mercantilism
Mercantilism was an economic theory and practice, dominant in Europe from the 16th to the 18th century, that promoted governmental regulation of a nation's economy for the purpose of augmenting state...
Mercantilism - Wikipedia
Physiocrats
Physiocracy (from the Greek for "Government of Nature") is an economic theory developed by a group of 18th century enlightened French economists who believed that the wealth of nations was derived sol...
Classical economics
Classical economics is widely regarded as the first modern school of economic thought. Its major developers include Adam Smith, Jean-Baptiste Say, David Ricardo, Thomas Malthus and John Stuart Mill.A...
American School (economics)
The American School, also known as the "National System", represents three different yet related constructs in politics, policy and philosophy. It was the American policy from the 1860s to the 1970s, ...
American School (economics) - Wikipedia
French Liberal School
The French Liberal School (also called the "Optimist School" or "Orthodox School") is a 19th-century school of economic thought that was centered on the Collège de France and the Institut de France. T...
Historical school of economics
The historical school of economics was an approach to academic economics and to public administration that emerged in the 19th century in Germany, and held sway there until well into the 20th century....
English historical school of economics
The English historical school of economics, although not nearly as famous as its German counterpart, sought a return of inductive methods in economics, following the triumph of the deductive approach ...
English historical school of economics - Wikipedia
Marxian economics
Marxian economics or the Marxian school of economics refers to a school of economic thought tracing its foundations to the critique of classical political economy first expounded upon by Karl Marx and...
Socialist economics
Socialist economics refers to the economic theories, practices, and norms of hypothetical and existing socialist economic systems.A socialist economic system is based on some form of social ownership ...
Ricardian socialism
Ricardian socialism is a branch of classical economic thought based upon the work of the economist David Ricardo (1772–1823). The term is used to describe economists in the 1820s and 1830s who develop...
Anarchist economics
Anarchist economics is the set of theories and practices of economics and economic activity within the political philosophy of anarchism.
The early English anarchist William Godwin´s views on econ...
Anarchist economics - Wikipedia
Distributism
Distributism (also known as distributionism or distributivism) is an economic ideology that developed in Europe in the late 19th and early 20th century based upon the principles of Catholic social tea...
Distributism - Wikipedia
Institutional economics
Institutional economics focuses on understanding the role of the evolutionary process and the role of institutions in shaping economic behaviour. Its original focus lay in Thorstein Veblen's instinct-...
New Institutional Economics
New institutional economics (NIE) is an economic perspective that attempts to extend economics by focusing on the social and legal norms and rules (which are institutions) that underlie economic activ...
Neoclassical economics
Neoclassical economics is a term variously used for approaches to economics focusing on the determination of prices, outputs, and income distributions in markets through supply and demand, often media...
Lausanne School
The Lausanne School of economics, sometimes referred to as the Mathematical School, refers to the neoclassical economics school of thought surrounding Léon Walras and Vilfredo Pareto. The central feat...
Austrian School
The Austrian School is a school of economic thought that is based on methodological individualism. It originated in late-19th and early-20th century Vienna with the work of Carl Menger, Eugen von Böh...
Austrian School - Wikipedia
Stockholm School
The Stockholm School (Swedish: Stockholmsskolan), is a school of economic thought whose antithesis is the gold standard centered Austrian School of Economics. It refers to a loosely organized grou...
Keynesian economics
Keynesian economics (/ˈkeɪnziən/ KAYN-zee-ən; or Keynesianism) is the view that in the short run, especially during recessions, economic output is strongly influenced by aggregate demand (total spendi...
Post-Keynesian economics
Post-Keynesian economics is a school of economic thought with its origins in The General Theory of John Maynard Keynes, although its subsequent development was influenced to a large degree by Michał K...
New Keynesian economics
New Keynesian economics is a school of contemporary macroeconomics that strives to provide microeconomic foundations for Keynesian economics. It developed partly as a response to criticisms of Keynesi...
Chicago school of economics
The Chicago school of economics is a neoclassical school of economic thought associated with the work of the faculty at the University of Chicago, some of whom have constructed and popularized its pri...
Carnegie School
The "Carnegie School" was a so-called "Freshwater" economics intellectual movement in the 1950s and 1960s based at Carnegie Mellon University and led by Herbert A. Simon, James March, and Richard Cyer...
Neo-Ricardianism
The neo-Ricardian school is an economic school that derives from the close reading and interpretation of David Ricardo by Piero Sraffa, and from Sraffa's critique of neo-classical economics as present...
Capital and Interest
Capital and Interest (German: Kapital und Kapitalzins) is a three-volume work on finance published by Austrian economist Eugen Böhm von Bawerk (1851–1914).The first two volumes were published in t...
Human Action
Human Action: A Treatise on Economics is a work by the Austrian economist and philosopher Ludwig von Mises. Widely considered Mises' magnum opus, it presents the case for laissez-faire capitalism base...
Human Action - Wikipedia