Search and seizure
Search and seizure is a procedure used in many civil law and common law legal systems whereby police or other authorities and their agents, who suspect that a crime has been committed, do a search of ...
Search and seizure - Wikipedia
Apple, Google Back Microsoft Over ‘Sneak-and-Peek’ Searches
They contend that secret searches are unconstitutional because “obtaining a warrant, but not disclosing it, nullifies an essential function of the warrant, which is to provide notice to the person who...
How Long Can a Cop Keep You After a Traffic Stop? No One's Sure
One of the murkiest areas in Fourth Amendment law. The police are forbidden from conducting searches and seizures without a warrant or probable cause. So they just ask for your permission to conduct a...
Fourth Amendment to the United States Constitution
The Fourth Amendment (Amendment IV) to the United States Constitution is the part of the Bill of Rights that prohibits unreasonable searches and seizures and requires any warrant to be judicially sanc...
Fourth Amendment to the United States Constitution - Wikipedia
Search warrant
A search warrant is a court order that a magistrate, judge or Supreme Court official issues to authorize law enforcement officers to conduct a search of a person, location, or vehicle for evidence of ...
Search warrant - Wikipedia
Probable cause
In United States criminal law, probable cause is the standard by which persons acting under the color of law has the grounds to obtain a warrant for, or as an exception to the warrant requirements fo...
Reasonable suspicion
Reasonable suspicion is a legal standard of proof in United States law that is less than probable cause, the legal standard for arrests and warrants, but more than an "inchoate and unparticularized su...
Traffic stop
A traffic stop, commonly called being pulled over, is a temporary detention of a driver of a vehicle by police to investigate a possible crime or minor violation of law. In constitutional law in the U...
Traffic stop - Wikipedia
Motor vehicle exception
The motor vehicle exception is a legal rule in the United States which allows the search of a motor vehicle without the search warrant normally required by the Fourth Amendment to the United States Co...
Motor vehicle exception - Wikipedia
Border search exception
The border search exception is a doctrine of United States criminal law that allows searches and seizures at international borders and their functional equivalent without a warrant or probable cause.T...
Exigent circumstance in United States law
An exigent circumstance, in the criminal procedure law of the United States, allows law enforcement, under certain circumstances, to enter a structure without a search warrant or, if they have a "knoc...
Search of persons
Police officers in various jurisdictions have power to search members of the public, for example, for weapons, drugs and stolen property. This article concerns searches of members of the public who ha...
Frisking
Frisking (also called a patdown or pat down) is a search of a person's outer clothing wherein a person runs his or her hands along the outer garments to detect any concealed weapons.
In the U.S., ...
Frisking - Wikipedia
Strip search
A strip search is a practice of searching a person for weapons or other contraband suspected of being hidden on their body or inside their clothing, and not found by performing a frisk search, by req...
Body cavity search
A body cavity search is either a visual search or a manual internal inspection of body cavities such as for prohibited material (contraband), such as illegal drugs, money, jewelry, or weapons. It is f...
Knock-and-announce
Knock-and-announce, in United States law of criminal procedure, is an ancient common-law principle, incorporated into the Fourth Amendment, which often requires law enforcement officers to announce th...
Knock-and-announce - Wikipedia
Minimally invasive warrantless search
A minimally intrusive/invasive warrantless search is a type of search that does not breach the boundaries of the property and is performed without any prerequisite search warrant. These searches are c...
Sneak and peek warrant
A sneak and peek search warrant (officially called a Delayed Notice Warrant and also called a covert entry search warrant or a surreptitious entry search warrant) is a search warrant authorizing the l...
Exclusionary rule
The exclusionary rule is a legal principle in the United States, under constitutional law, which holds that evidence collected or analyzed in violation of the defendant's constitutional rights is some...
Good-faith exception
In United States constitutional law, the good-faith exception (also good-faith doctrine) is a legal doctrine providing an exemption to the exclusionary rule. The exemption allows evidence collected in...
Spoliation of evidence
The spoliation of evidence is the intentional, reckless, or negligent withholding, hiding, altering, or destroying of evidence relevant to a legal proceeding. Spoliation has two possible consequences...
Warrantless searches in the United States
Warrantless searches are searches and seizures conducted without search warrants. In the United States, warrantless searches are restricted under the Fourth Amendment to the United States Constitution...
Apple, Google Back Microsoft Over ‘Sneak-and-Peek’ Searches
They contend that secret searches are unconstitutional because “obtaining a warrant, but not disclosing it, nullifies an essential function of the warrant, which is to provide notice to the person who...
Bodog
Bodog is an entertainment brand founded in 2000 by Canadian entrepreneur Calvin Ayre. While primarily associated with online gambling companies, the brand has adorned a diverse crop of ventures, inclu...
Megaupload
Megaupload Ltd is an online Hong Kong–based company established in 2005 that ran online services related to file storage and viewing, including megaupload.com. The domain names were seized, and the si...
Megaupload - Wikipedia
PokerStars
PokerStars, with nearly 50 million registered players at the start of 2012, is the largest online poker cardroom in the world.A PokerStars.com online satellite tournament produced the 2003 World Serie...
PokerStars - Wikipedia
Stop and search
The powers of the police in England and Wales are defined largely by statute law, with the main sources of power being the Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984 and the Police Act 1996. This article c...
Katz v. United States
Katz v. United States, 389 U.S. 347 (1967), is a United States Supreme Court case discussing the nature of the "right to privacy" and the legal definition of a "search". The Court's ruling refined...