Pronunciation of English th
In English, the digraph ⟨th⟩ represents in most cases one of two different phonemes: the voiced dental fricative /ð/ (as in this) and the voiceless dental fricative /θ/ (thing). More rar...
Intervocalic alveolar flapping
Intervocalic alveolar flapping is a phonological process found in many dialects of English, especially North American English (to varying extents) and Australian English and New Zealand English, by wh...
Phonological history of English short A
The pronunciation of "short A" varies in English.
Late Middle English had two phonemes /a/ and /aː/, differing only in length. /a/ ("short A") was found in words such as cat [kat] or trap [trap],...
Phonological history of English short A - Wikipedia
English-language vowel changes before historic /r/
In English, many vowel shifts only affect vowels followed by /r/ in rhotic dialects, or vowels that were historically followed by an /r/ that has since been elided in non-rhotic dialects. Most of them...
Phonological history of English consonants
The phonological history of English consonants is part of the phonological history of the English language in terms of changes in the phonology of consonants.
Phonological history of English consonants - Wikipedia
Phonological history of English diphthongs
English diphthongs have undergone many changes since the Middle English period. Each of the following sound changes involved at least one phoneme which historically was a diphthong. The sound changes ...
Phonological history of English diphthongs - Wikipedia
Phonological change
In historical linguistics, phonological change is any sound change which alters the number or distribution of phonemes in a language.In a typological scheme first systematized by Henry M. Hoenigswald,...
Th-stopping
Th-stopping is the realization of the dental fricatives [θ, ð] as stops—either dental or alveolar—which occurs in several dialects of English. In some accents, such as Hiberno-English, som...
Th-stopping - Wikipedia
Phonological history of English
The phonological history of English describes changing phonology of the English language over time, starting from its roots in proto-Germanic to diverse changes in different dialects of modern English...
Phonological history of English - Wikipedia
Phonological history of English high back vowels
Most dialects of modern English have two high back vowels: the close back rounded vowel /u/ found in words like goose, and the near-close near-back rounded vowel /ʊ/ found in words like foot. This art...
Phonological history of English high back vowels - Wikipedia
Th-alveolarization
Th-alveolarization is a process that occurs in some African varieties of English where the dental fricatives /ð, θ/ merge with the alveolar fricatives /z, s/. It is an example of assibilation.It is of...
Phonological history of English consonant clusters
The phonological history of the English language includes various changes in the phonology of consonant clusters.
The h-cluster reductions are various consonant reductions that have occurred in th...
Phonological history of English consonant clusters - Wikipedia
Phonological history of wh
The pronunciation of the digraph ⟨wh⟩ in English has varied with time, and can still vary today between different regions. According to the historical period and the accent of the speake...
Phonological history of wh - Wikipedia
Th-fronting
Th-fronting refers to the pronunciation of the English "th" as "f" or "v". When th-fronting is applied, /θ/ becomes /f/ (for example, three is pronounced as free) and /ð/ becomes /v/ (for example, bat...
Th-fronting - Wikipedia
Rhotic and non-rhotic accents
English accents are commonly divided into two main groups: rhotic speakers pronounce a historical rhotic consonant (/r/) in all instances, whereas non-rhotic speakers pronounce /r/ only before or betw...
Rhotic and non-rhotic accents - Wikipedia
Phonological history of English low back vowels
The phonology of the low back vowels of the English language has undergone changes both overall and with regional variations, dating from Late Middle English (c. 1400) to the present. The sound change...
Phonological history of English low back vowels - Wikipedia
Phonological history of English high front vowels
The high front vowels of English have undergone a variety of changes over time, which may vary from dialect to dialect.
The shortening of /ɛː/ is a process that occurred in Middle English that cau...
Phonological history of English high front vowels - Wikipedia
Old English phonology
Old English phonology is necessarily somewhat speculative since Old English is preserved only as a written language. Nevertheless, there is a very large corpus of the language, and the orthography app...
English-language vowel changes before historic r
In English, many vowel shifts only affect vowels followed by /r/ in rhotic dialects, or vowels that were historically followed by an /r/ that has since been elided in non-rhotic dialects. Most of them...
English-language vowel changes before historic r - Wikipedia
Phonological history of English fricatives and affricates
The phonological history of English fricatives and affricates is part of the phonological history of the English language in terms of changes in the phonology of fricative and affricate consonants.
Phonological history of English fricatives and affricates - Wikipedia
Th (digraph)
Th is a digraph in the Latin script. It was originally introduced into Latin to transliterate Greek loan words. In modern languages which use the Latin alphabet, it represents a number of different so...
Th (digraph) - Wikipedia
Phonological history of English vowels
In the history of English phonology, there were many diachronic sound changes affecting vowels, especially involving phonemic splits and mergers.
The Great Vowel Shift was a series of chain shifts...
Th-debuccalization
Th-debuccalization is a process in varieties of Scots and Scottish English where a voiceless dental fricative /θ/ (spelled th) at the beginning of a word and between vowels becomes the voiceless glott...