The names of God in Judaism
The name of God in Judaism used most often in the Hebrew Bible is יהוה (YHWH), also known as the Tetragrammaton. Elohim (God, singular and plural form, depending on the context), and Adonai (master),...
The names of God in Judaism - Wikipedia
I Am that I Am
What would happen if your toys REALLY came to life? A short film by Mikey Day and Andrew Friedman originated at The Groundlings Theater in L.A..
Tetragrammaton
The tetragrammaton (from Greek τετραγράμματον, meaning "(consisting of) four letters") is the Hebrew theonym יהוה, commonly transliterated into Latin letters as YHWH. It is one of the names of the nat...
Tetragrammaton - Wikipedia
Yahweh
Yahweh (/ˈjɑːhweɪ/, or often /ˈjɑːweɪ/ in English; Hebrew: יהוה‎), was the national god of Israel and Judah. In the Hebrew Bible his name is written as יהוה (YHWH), without vowels; the original ...
Yahweh - Wikipedia
I Am that I Am
I Am that I Am (אֶהְיֶה אֲשֶׁר אֶהְיֶה, ehyeh ašer ehyeh [ehˈje aˈʃer ehˈje]) is the common English translation (JPS among others) of the response God used in the Hebrew Bible when Moses asked for his...
Adonaist
An Adonaist (Heb. Lord, a scriptural title of the Supreme Being) among critics, a sect or party who maintain that the Hebrew language vowel points ordinarily annexed to the consonants of the word "Jeh...
El (deity)
ʾĒl (written aleph-lamed, e.g. Ugaritic: 𐎛𐎍, Phoenician: 𐤋𐤀, Hebrew: אל‎, Classical Syriac: ܐܠ, Arabic: إل‎ or إله, cognate to Akkadian: ilu) is a Northwest Semitic wor...
El (deity) - Wikipedia
Elah
Elah may refer to:
Elohim
Elohim (Hebrew: אֱלֹהִים) is a grammatically singular or plural noun for "god" or "gods" in both modern and ancient Hebrew language.When used with singular verbs and adjectives elohim is usually singu...
Elohim - Wikipedia
El Roi
El Roi is one of the names of God in the Hebrew Bible.
The translation of El Roi is commonly "The God Who Sees". El Roi is a descriptive epithet for God using the word "El" (God) and a modifier in...
El Shaddai
El Shaddai (Hebrew: אל שדי‎, [el ʃaˈdːaj]) is one of the names of the primary Judaic god, with its etymology coming from the influence of the Ugaritic religion upon modern Judaism. Shaddai was o...
Elyon
Elyon (Biblical Hebrew עליון; Masoretic ʿElyōn; traditionally rendered in Samaritan as illiyyon) is an epithet of the God of Israel in the Hebrew Bible. ʾĒl ʿElyōn is usually rendered in English as "...
Shalom
Shalom (שָׁלוֹם) (Sephardic Hebrew/Israeli Hebrew: shalom; Ashkenazi Hebrew/Yiddish: sholom, sholem, sholoim, shulem) is a Hebrew word meaning peace, completeness, prosperity, and welfare and can be u...
Shalom - Wikipedia
Shekhinah
Shekinah, Shechinah, Shechina, or Schechinah (Hebrew: שכינה‎; Arabic: السكينة‎), is the English transliteration of a Hebrew noun meaning dwelling or settling, and denotes the dwelling...
Adon
Adon literally "lord, patron." Adon has an uncertain etymology it is generally believe to be derived from the Ugaritic ad, “father.”
The pluralization of Adoni "my lord" is Adonai "my lords." Ott...
Jehovah
Jehovah (/dʒɨˈhoʊvə/, jə-HO-və) is a Latinization of the Hebrew יְהֹוָה, one vocalization of the Tetragrammaton יהוה (YHWH), the proper name of the God of Israel in the Hebrew Bible. This vocalization...
Jehovah - Wikipedia
Allah
Allah (/ˈælə/ or /ˈɑːlə/; Arabic: الله‎ Allāh, [ʔalˤˈlˤɑːh]) is the Arabic word for God (al ilāh, literally "the God"). The word has cognates in other Semitic languages, including Alah or El...
Allah - Wikipedia
Sons of God
Sons of God (Heb: bənê hāʼĕlōhîm, בני האלהים) is a phrase used in the Hebrew Bible. Bene elohim are part of different Jewish angelic hierarchies.
In the Hebrew Bible, the phrase "sons of the Elohi...
El (disambiguation)
EL, El or el may refer to:
Raphael Patai
Raphael Patai (Hebrew רפאל פטאי) (November 22, 1910 − July 20, 1996), born Ervin György Patai, was a Hungarian-Jewish ethnographer, historian, Orientalist and anthropologist.
Patai was born in Bud...
Pluralis excellentiae
The pluralis excellentiae is the name given by early grammarians of Hebrew, such as Wilhelm Gesenius, to a perceived anomaly in the grammatical number and syntax in Hebrew. In some cases it bears some...
Hebrew grammar
Hebrew grammar is the grammar of the Hebrew language.
The Masoretes in the 7th to 11th centuries laid the foundation for grammatical analysis of Hebrew. As early as the 9th century Judah ibn Kurai...
Alaha
Allah (/ˈælə/ or /ˈɑːlə/; Arabic: الله‎ Allāh, [ʔalˤˈlˤɑːh]) is the Arabic word for God (al ilāh, literally "the God"). The word has cognates in other Semitic languages, including Elah in Ar...
Alaha - Wikipedia
Sfire treaty inscriptions
The Sfire or Sefire steles are three 8th-century BCE basalt stelae containing Aramaic inscriptions discovered at Al-Safirah ("Sfire") near Aleppo, Syria. The Sefire treaty inscriptions are the three i...
Poseidon
Poseidon (/pɵˈsaɪdən/; Greek: Ποσειδῶν, [pose͜edɔ́͜ɔn]) is one of the twelve Olympian deities of the pantheon in Greek mythology. His main domain is the ocean, and he is called the "God of the Sea". A...
Poseidon - Wikipedia
The Hebrew Goddess
The Hebrew Goddess is a 1967 book by Jewish historian and anthropologist Raphael Patai. In this book he argues that historically, the Jewish religion had elements of polytheism, especially the worship...
Son of God
Historically, many rulers have assumed titles such as son of god, son of a god or son of Heaven. The Roman Emperor Augustus referred to his relation to his deified adoptive father, Julius Caesar, as "...
Son of God - Wikipedia
Canaanite religion
Canaanite religion is the name for the group of Ancient Semitic religions practiced by the Canaanites living in the ancient Levant from at least the early Bronze Age through the first centuries of the...
Canaanite religion - Wikipedia
Philo of Byblos
Philo of Byblos (or Herennius Philon; Greek: Φίλων; c. 64 – 141 CE), born in Byblos of Lebanon, was an antiquarian writer of grammatical, lexical and historical works in Greek. He is chiefly known for...