Mahakali
Mahakali (Sanskrit: Mahākālī, Devanagari: महाकाली), literally translated as Great Kali, is the Hindu Goddess of time and death, considered to be the consort of Shiva the God of consciousness, and the ...
Mahakali - Wikipedia
Hemsut
In Egyptian mythology, Hemsut (or Hemuset) were the Goddesses of Fate, destiny and protection in Ancient Egypt. They were closely associated with the concept of the ka (life force or spirit) and could...
Nona (mythology)
Nona was one of the Parcae, the three personifications of destiny in Roman mythology (the Moirai in Greek mythology and in Germanic mythology, the Norns), and the Roman goddess of pregnancy. The Roman...
Nona (mythology) - Wikipedia
Ananke (mythology)
In ancient Greek religion, Ananke (/əˈnæŋkiː/), also spelled Anangke, Anance, or Anagke (Greek: Ἀνάγκη, from the common noun ἀνάγκη, "force, constraint, necessity"), was the personification of destin...
Ananke (mythology) - Wikipedia
Moirai
In Greek mythology, the Moirai (Ancient Greek: Μοῖραι, "apportioners", Latinized as Moerae)—often known in English as the Fates—were the white-robed incarnations of destiny (Roman equivalent: Par...
Moirai - Wikipedia
Norns
The Norns (Old Norse: norn, plural: nornir) in Norse mythology are female beings who rule the destiny of gods and men, possibly a kind of dísir (see below), and comparable to the Moirai (also called "...
Norns - Wikipedia
Morta (mythology)
In Roman mythology, Morta was the goddess of death. She is one of the Parcae, related to the Roman conception of the Fates in Greek mythology, the Moirai. Her Greek equivalent is Atropos, She is respo...
Morta (mythology) - Wikipedia
Carmenta
In ancient Roman religion and myth, Carmenta was a goddess of childbirth and prophecy, associated with technological innovation as well as the protection of mothers and children, and a patron of midwi...
Carmenta - Wikipedia
Fortuna
Fortuna (Latin: Fortūna, equivalent to the Greek goddess Tyche) was the goddess of fortune and personification of luck in Roman religion. She might bring good luck or bad: she could be represented...
Fortuna - Wikipedia
Sreća
Sreća (English: happiness, luck, also spelled Sretya, pronounced "srech-ah") is a Serbian goddess of fate. She spins the thread of life, as an assistant to the great Goddess Makosh. Her role is th...
Anna Perenna
Anna Perenna was an old Roman deity of the circle or "ring" of the year, as the name (per annum) clearly indicates. Her festival fell on the Ides of March (March 15), which would have marked the first...
Hutena
In Hurrian mythology, the Hutena are goddesses of fate. They are similar to the Norns of Norse mythology or the Moirai of ancient Greece. They are called the Gul Ses (Gul-Shesh; Gulshesh; Gul-ashshesh...
Antevorta
In ancient Roman religion, Antevorta was a goddess of the future, also known as Porrima. She and her sister Postverta (or Postvorta) were described as companions or siblings of the goddess Carmenta, s...
Clotho
Clotho (/ˈkloʊθoʊ/; Greek: Κλωθώ) is the youngest of the Three Fates or Moirai – including her sisters Lachesis and Atropos, in ancient Greek mythology. Her Roman equivalent is Nona. Clotho was r...
Clotho - Wikipedia
Aeternitas
In ancient Roman religion, Aeternitas was the divine personification of eternity. She was particularly associated with Imperial cult as a virtue of the deified emperor (divus). The religious maintenan...
Aeternitas - Wikipedia
Lauma
Latvian: Lauma, Lithuanian: Laumė is a woodland fae, and guardian spirit of orphans in Eastern Baltic mythology. Originally a sky spirit, her compassion for human suffering brought her to earth to sha...
Nortia
Nortia is the Latinized name of an Etruscan goddess whose sphere of influence was time, fate, destiny and chance. The Etruscan form was perhaps Nurtia. Variant manuscript readings include Norcia, Nors...
Kallone
Kallone (Greek Καλλονή "beauty") is one third of the Greek trio of gods comprising Fate, Birth and Beauty; or Moira, Eileithyia and Kallone respectively. She is described in Plato's Symposium as an a...
Dalia (mythology)
Dalia is the goddess of fate in the Lithuanian mythology. She is the giver and taker of goods and property. Dalia is often confused with and hard to distinguish from Laima, another goddess of fate. So...
Tyche
Tyche (/ˈtaɪki/; from Greek: Τύχη, meaning "luck"; Roman equivalent: Fortuna) was the presiding tutelary deity that governed the fortune and prosperity of a city, its destiny. She is the daughter ...
Tyche - Wikipedia
Huh (god)
Heh (also Huh, Hah, Hauh, Huah, Hahuh, Hehu), in ancient Egypt, was the deification of infinity or eternity in the Ogdoad, his name itself meaning "endlessness". His female counterpart was known as H...
Kan-Laon
Kan-Laon is the name of an ancient Visayan deity. During pre-Hispanic times, the deity was worshiped by the natives as their Supreme Ruler. Kan-Laon means "One Who Is the Ruler Of Time". Mt. Canlaon, ...
Kan-Laon - Wikipedia
Postverta
In Roman mythology, Postverta or Postvorta (also Porrima) was the goddess of the past and one of the two Carmentes (along with her sister Antevorta, or prorsa contracted form of Proversa). They were ...
Postverta - Wikipedia
Ishtar
Ishtar (English pronunciation /ˈɪʃtɑːr/; Transliteration: IŠTAR; Akkadian: 𒀭𒈹 ; Sumerian 𒀭𒌋𒁯) is the East Semitic Akkadian, Assyrian and Babylonian goddess of fertility, love, war, and sex. She ...
Ishtar - Wikipedia
Camenae
In Roman mythology, the Camenae (/kəˈmiːniː/; also Casmenae, Camoenae) were originally goddesses of childbirth, wells and fountains, and also prophetic deities.There were four Camenae: The last two we...
Camenae - Wikipedia
Verðandi
In Norse mythology, Verðandi (Old Norse, meaning possibly "happening" or "present"), sometimes anglicized as Verdandi or Verthandi, is one of the norns. Along with Urðr (Old Norse "fate") and Skuld (p...
Verðandi - Wikipedia
Decima (mythology)
In Roman mythology, Decima was one of the Parcae, or the Fates. She measured the thread of life with her rod. She was also revered as the goddess of childbirth. Her Greek equivalent was Lachesis....
Female spirits in Germanic paganism
In Norse mythology, a dís ("lady", plural dísir) is a ghost, spirit or deity associated with fate who can be both benevolent and antagonistic towards mortal people. Dísir may act as protective spirits...
Female spirits in Germanic paganism - Wikipedia
Mamitu
In Mesopotamian mythology Mamitu was the goat-headed goddess of destiny, who decreed the fate of the new-borns. She was also worshipped as goddess of the oath, later a goddess of fate and a judge in t...