Folk saint
Folk saints are dead people or other spiritually powerful entities (such as indigenous spirits) venerated as saints but not officially canonized. Since they are saints of the "folk", or the populus, t...
Martyr
A martyr (Greek: μάρτυς, mártys, "witness"; stem μάρτυρ-, mártyr-) is somebody who suffers persecution and/or death for advocating, renouncing, refusing to renounce, and/or refusing to advocate a beli...
Martyr - Wikipedia
Stylites
A stylite (from Greek στυλίτης, stylitēs, "pillar dweller", derived from στῦλος, stylos, "pillar", Classical Syriac: ܐܣܛܘܢܐ ʼasṯonáyé) or pillar-saint is a type of Christian ascetic in the early ...
Stylites - Wikipedia
Holy Unmercenaries
Holy Unmercenaries (Greek: Άγιοι Ανάργυροι, Agioi Anárgyroi) is an epithet applied to a number of Christian saints who did not accept payment for good deeds. These include healers or Christian physici...
Holy Unmercenaries - Wikipedia
Saint Rubin
Saint Rubin is a saint of the Syrian Orthodox church. He was a stylite of Kartamin. He is commemorated with feast days of August 1 and August 4.
Great martyr
Great Martyr or Great-Martyr (Greek: μεγαλομάρτυρ, megalomartyr, from megas, "great" + "martyr") is a classification of saints who are venerated in the Eastern Orthodox Church and those Eastern Ca...
Great martyr - Wikipedia
Mary Slessor
Mary Mitchell Slessor (2 December 1848 – 13 January 1915) was a Scottish missionary to Nigeria. Her work and strong personality allowed her to be trusted and accepted by the locals while spreading Ch...
Mary Slessor - Wikipedia
William Harris Murch
Rev. Dr. William Harris Murch (1784 – 12 July 1859) was a Baptist Minister who served as a joint secretary of the Baptist Union and the Theological head and President of the Stepney Academy.
Murch...
William Harris Murch - Wikipedia
Jonah of Hankou
Bishiop Jonah (secular name Vladimir Pokrovsky, Russian: Владимир Покровский; April 17, 1888 – October 20, 1925), was a bishop of Hankou of the Russian Orthodox Church Outside Russia (ROCOR). He s...
Jonah of Hankou - Wikipedia
Joshua the Stylite
Joshua the Stylite (also spelled Yeshu Stylite and Ieshu Stylite) is the attributed author of a chronicle which narrates the history of the war between the Later Roman Empire and Persians between 502 ...
Hermit
A hermit (adjectival form: eremitic or hermitic) is a person who lives in seclusion from society.
In Christianity, the term was originally applied to a Christian who lives the eremitic life out of...
Hermit - Wikipedia
Olga of Kiev
Saint Olga (Old Church Slavonic: Ольга, born c. 890 died 11 July 969, Kiev) was a ruler of Kievan Rus' as regent (945–c. 963) for her son, Svyatoslav.
Olga, a woman from Pskov, married the fut...
Olga of Kiev - Wikipedia
Foolishness for Christ
Foolishness for Christ refers to behavior such as giving up all one's worldly possessions upon joining a monastic order, or to deliberate flouting of society's conventions to serve a religious purpose...
Foolishness for Christ - Wikipedia
Luka (Voyno-Yasenetsky)
Archbishop Luka (Luke, Russian: Архиепи́скоп Лука́, born Valentin Felixovich Voyno-Yasenetsky, Russian: Валенти́н Фе́ликсович Во́йно-Ясене́цкий; April 27/May 9, 1877 in Kerch - June 11, 1961,S...
Luka (Voyno-Yasenetsky) - Wikipedia
Doctor of the Church
Doctor of the Church (Latin doctor, teacher, from Latin docere, to teach) is a title given by a variety of Christian churches to individuals whom they recognize as having been of particular importance...
Doctor of the Church - Wikipedia
Vladimir the Great
Vladimir Sviatoslavich the Great (Old East Slavic: Володимѣръ Свѧтославичь Volodiměrъ Svętoslavičь, Old Norse as Valdamarr Sveinaldsson, Russian: Влади́мир, Vladimir, Ukrainian: Володимир, Vo...
Vladimir the Great - Wikipedia
Thaumaturgy
Thaumaturgy (from the Greek words θαῦμα thaûma, meaning "miracle" or "marvel" and ἔργον érgon, meaning "work") is the capability of a magician or a saint to work magic or miracles. Isaac Bonewits def...
Diodorus of Tarsus
Diodore of Tarsus (Greek Διόδωρος; died c. 390) was a Christian bishop, a monastic reformer, and a theologian. A strong supporter of the orthodoxy of Nicaea, Diodore played a pivotal role in the Coun...
Venerable
The Venerable is used as a style or epithet in several Christian churches. It is also the common English-language translation of a number of Buddhist titles.
In the Latin Church of the Catholic Ch...
Venerable - Wikipedia
María del Monte Carmelo Sallés y Barangueras
Carmen Salles y Barangueras (born 9 April 1848, Vic, Barcelona – d. 25 July 1911, Madrid) was a Spanish nun who is noted for founding the Order of the Missionary Sisters of The Immaculate Conception a...
José Tomás de Sousa Martins
Dr José Tomás de Sousa Martins (7 March 1843 – 19 August 1897) was a doctor renowned for his work amongst the poor in Lisbon, Portugal. After his death, a secular cult has arisen around him in which h...
José Tomás de Sousa Martins - Wikipedia
Alphonsus Maria de' Liguori
Alphonsus Maria de' Liguori, C.Ss.R. (27 September 1696 – 1 August 1787), was an Italian Catholic bishop, spiritual writer, composer, scholastic philosopher and theologian.He founded the Congreg...
Alphonsus Maria de' Liguori - Wikipedia
Ambrose
Aurelius Ambrosius, better known in English as Saint Ambrose (/ˈæmbroʊz/; c. 340 – 4 April 397), was a bishop of Milan who became one of the most influential ecclesiastical figures of t...
Ambrose - Wikipedia
Saint Blaise
Saint Blaise (Armenian: Սուրբ Վլասի, Soorp Vlasi; Greek: Άγιος Βλάσιος, Agios Vlasios), also known as Saint Blase, was a physician, and bishop of Sebastea in historical Armenia (modern Sivas, Turk...
Saint Blaise - Wikipedia
Werburgh
Werburh or Wærburh (also known as Werburgh and Werburga) (d. 3 February 699 at Trentham) was an Anglo-Saxon princess who became an English saint and the patron saint of Chester. Her feast day is Febru...
Werburgh - Wikipedia
Nikita Stylites
Venerable Nikita Stylites, a saint of 12th century Russia, led a dissolute life in his youth. However, upon entering a church on a certain occasion he heard the words of the Prophet Isaiah (1:16) 'Wa...
Nikita Stylites - Wikipedia