Gulag
The Gulag (Russian: ГУЛАГ, GULAG; [ɡʊˈlak]) was the government agency that administered the main Soviet forced labor camp systems during the Stalin era, from the 1930s until the 1950s. While the ...
Gulag - Wikipedia
White Swan (prison)
56°42′25″E / 59.681°N 56.707°E / 59.681; 56.707White Swan (Russian: Белый Лебедь; also known as VK-240/2 Russian: ВК-240/2) is the informal name for an infamous colony...
Bolshoy Solovetsky Island
Bolshoy Solovetsky Island (Russian: Большой Соловецкий остров), or simply Solovetsky Island (Russian: Соловецкий остров) is the biggest island of the Solovetsky Islands archipelago in the Whit...
Bolshoy Solovetsky Island - Wikipedia
Foreign forced labor in the Soviet Union
Foreign forced labor was used by the Soviet Union during and in the aftermath of World War II, which continued up to 1950s. There have been two categories of foreigners amassed for forced labor: pr...
Foreign forced labor in the Soviet Union - Wikipedia
Volga–Don Canal
44°09′00″E / 48.57000°N 44.15000°E / 48.57000; 44.15000 (end)Lenin Volga–Don Shipping Canal (Russian: Волго–Донской судоходный канал имени В. И. Ленина, Volga-Dons...
Volga–Don Canal - Wikipedia
Yertsevo
Yertsevo (Russian: Ерцево) is a rural locality (a settlement) in Konoshsky District of Arkhangelsk Oblast, Russia, located west of Lake Vozhe. Population: 4,201 (2010 Census); 4,013 (2...
Forced labor of Germans after World War II
In the years following World War II, large numbers of German civilians and captured soldiers were forced into labour by the Allied forces. The topic of using Germans as forced labour for reparations ...
Forced labor of Germans after World War II - Wikipedia
Forced labor of Germans in the Soviet Union
Forced labor of Germans in the Soviet Union was considered by the Soviet Union to be part of German war reparations for the damage inflicted by Nazi Germany on the Soviet Union during World War II. Ge...
Forced labor of Germans in the Soviet Union - Wikipedia
Ivan Fedorovich Nikishov
Ivan Fedorovich Nikishov (also Nikishev) (Russian: Иван Фёдорович Никишов; 1894 – August 5, 1956) was a Russian general of the NKVD and director of Dalstroy.
Nikishov was born in 1894 the son...
Polish prisoners-of-war in the Soviet Union after 1939
As a result of the Soviet invasion of Poland in 1939, hundreds of thousands of Polish soldiers became prisoners of war in the Soviet Union. Many of them were executed; over 20,000 Polish military pers...
Polish prisoners-of-war in the Soviet Union after 1939 - Wikipedia
David Rousset
David Rousset (January 18, 1912, Roanne, Loire — December 13, 1997) was a French writer and political activist, a recipient of Prix Renaudot, a French literary award. Survivor of the Neuengamme...
Forced labor of Hungarians in the Soviet Union
The topic of forced labor of Hungarians in the Soviet Union in the aftermath of World War II was not researched until the fall of Communism and the dissolution of the Soviet Union. While exact numbers...
Forced settlements in the Soviet Union
Forced settlements in the Soviet Union took several forms. Though the most notorious was the Gulag labor camp system of penal labor, resettling of entire categories of population was another method of...
Forced settlements in the Soviet Union - Wikipedia
Forced labor in the Soviet Union
The following closely related categories of forced labor in the Soviet Union may be distinguished.
Forced labor in the Soviet Union - Wikipedia
Alexander Ogorodnikov
Alexander Ogorodnikov (Russian: Алекса́ндр Иои́льевич Огоро́дников; born May 26, 1950) is a former chairman of the Russian Orthodox Argentov Seminar, peace activist, Gulag survivor and founder of ...
Salekhard–Igarka Railway
The 1,524 mm (5 ft) broad gauge Salekhard–Igarka Railway, (Трансполярная магистраль, Transpolyarnaya Magistral - "Transpolar Mainline") also referred to variously as Мёртвая дорога (Dead Roa...
Salekhard–Igarka Railway - Wikipedia
German prisoners of war in the Soviet Union
Approximately three million German prisoners of war were captured by the Soviet Union during World War II, most of them during the great advances of the Red Army in the last year of the war. The POW...
German prisoners of war in the Soviet Union - Wikipedia
Order 7161
Order 7161 refers to the top secret USSR State Defense Committee Order no 7161ss (Постановление № 7161cc ГКО СССР) of December 16, 1944 about mobilisation and internment of able-bodied Germans for rep...
Corrective labor colony
A corrective labor colony (Russian: Исправительно-трудовая колония, ИТК, ispravitelno-trudovaya koloniya, ITK) is the most common type of prison in Russia and some post-Soviet states which combine...
Japanese prisoners of war in the Soviet Union
By the end of World War II there were from 560,000 to 760,000 Japanese POWs in the Soviet Union and Mongolia interned to work in labor camps. Of them, about 10% died (50–60,000), mostly during the win...
Japanese prisoners of war in the Soviet Union - Wikipedia
Vaninsky port
«I remember that port in Vanino» (Russian: Я помню тот Ванинский порт) — a popular Russian folk song of the USSR epoch, which is often called an anthem of Soviet GULAG prisoners on Kolyma. Time of...
Main Administration for Affairs of Prisoners of War and Internees
The Main Administration for Affairs of Prisoners of War and Internees (Russian: Главное управление по делам военнопленных и интернированных НКВД/МВД СССР, ГУПВИ, GUPVI) was a department of NKVD (l...
Labor army
The notion of the Labor army (трудовая армия, трудармия) was introduced in Soviet Russia during 1920. Initially the term was applied to regiments of Red Army transferred from military activity to labo...
Romanian prisoners of war in the Soviet Union
By the end of World War II the number of Romanian prisoners of war in the Soviet Union was significant, about 140,000 of them having been taken prisoner even after August 23, 1944, the date when Roman...
Romanian prisoners of war in the Soviet Union - Wikipedia
POW labor in the Soviet Union
Systematic POW labor in the Soviet Union is associated primarily with the outcomes of World War II and covers the period of 1939-1956, from the official formation of the first POW camps, to the repatr...