United States Constitution and worldwide influence
The United States Constitution and worldwide influence is a view that the United States Constitution has had considerable international influence on later constitutions as well as on legal thinking.
United States Constitution and worldwide influence - Wikipedia
How Ignorance Of History Feeds Demagogues Who Hate The Constitution
Americans in 1913 showed by their votes they had forgotten the purpose of the Framers’ design for the Senate. We've done even worse.
US Supreme Court Justice Ginsburg Tells Egyptians Don't Look to The Old US Constitution
US Supreme Court Justice Ginsburg Tells Egyptians Don't Look to The Old US Constitution When You Write Yours
Ed Rollins: The FBI is not an independent agency
Get in Line - Ed Rollins: The FBI is not an independent agency – it needs to know it answers to President Donald J. Trump! Listen below!
Mark Levin talks 'Rediscovering Americanism'
Author speaks out on 'Fox & Friends'
Amy Goodman Is Facing Prison For Reporting On The Dakota Access Pipeline. That Should Scare Us All.
This Monday morning, shortly after the sun rises over the small city of Mandan, North Dakota, the award-winning journalist, and host of Democracy Now!, Amy Goodman will walk into the Morton County–Man...
United States Constitution
The Constitution of the United States is the supreme law of the United States of America. The Constitution, originally comprising seven articles, delineates the national frame of government. Its firs...
United States Constitution - Wikipedia
How Ignorance Of History Feeds Demagogues Who Hate The Constitution
Americans in 1913 showed by their votes they had forgotten the purpose of the Framers’ design for the Senate. We've done even worse.
List of United States Supreme Court cases by the Warren Court
This is a chronological list of cases decided by the United States Supreme Court during the tenure of Chief Justice Earl Warren (5 October 1953 through 23 June 1969), a period better known as the Warr...
List of United States Supreme Court cases by the Warren Court - Wikipedia
Thirteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution
The Thirteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution abolished slavery and involuntary servitude, except as punishment for a crime. In Congress, it was passed by the Senate on April 8, 1864, and...
Thirteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution - Wikipedia
Equal Protection Clause
The Equal Protection Clause is part of the Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution. The clause, which took effect in 1868, provides that no state shall deny to any person within its jur...
Equal Protection Clause - Wikipedia
Twentieth Amendment to the United States Constitution
The Twentieth Amendment (Amendment XX) to the United States Constitution moved the beginning and ending of the terms of the President and Vice President from March 4 to January 20, and of members of C...
Twentieth Amendment to the United States Constitution - Wikipedia
Tenth Amendment to the United States Constitution
The Tenth Amendment (Amendment X) to the United States Constitution, which is part of the Bill of Rights, was ratified on December 15, 1791. It expresses the principle of federalism, which undergirds...
Ninth Amendment to the United States Constitution
The Ninth Amendment (Amendment IX) to the United States Constitution, which is part of the Bill of Rights, addresses rights, retained by the people, that are not specifically enumerated in the Constit...
Eighth Amendment to the United States Constitution
The Eighth Amendment (Amendment VIII) to the United States Constitution is the part of the United States Bill of Rights (ratified December 15, 1791) prohibiting the federal government from imposing e...
Eighth Amendment to the United States Constitution - Wikipedia
Seventh Amendment to the United States Constitution
The Seventh Amendment (Amendment VII) to the United States Constitution is part of the Bill of Rights. This amendment codifies the right to a jury trial in certain civil cases, and inhibits courts fro...
Seventh Amendment to the United States Constitution - Wikipedia
Fourth Amendment to the United States Constitution
The Fourth Amendment (Amendment IV) to the United States Constitution is the part of the Bill of Rights that prohibits unreasonable searches and seizures and requires any warrant to be judicially sanc...
Fourth Amendment to the United States Constitution - Wikipedia
War Powers Clause
Article I, Section 8, Clause 11 of the United States Constitution, sometimes referred to as the War Powers Clause, vests in the Congress the power to declare war, in the following wording:A number of...
War Powers Clause - Wikipedia
Sixth Amendment to the United States Constitution
The Sixth Amendment (Amendment VI) to the United States Constitution is the part of the United States Bill of Rights that sets forth rights related to criminal prosecutions. The Supreme Court has appl...
Fifth Amendment to the United States Constitution
The Fifth Amendment to the United States Constitution is part of the Bill of Rights and protects against a person being compelled to be a witness against himself or herself in a criminal case. Taking...
Fifth Amendment to the United States Constitution - Wikipedia
Third Amendment to the United States Constitution
The Third Amendment (Amendment III) to the United States Constitution places restrictions on the quartering of soldiers in private homes without the owner's consent, forbidding the practice in peacet...
Third Amendment to the United States Constitution - Wikipedia
Second Amendment to the United States Constitution
The Second Amendment (Amendment II) to the United States Constitution protects the right of the people to keep and bear arms. The Supreme Court of the United States has ruled that the right belongs to...
Second Amendment to the United States Constitution - Wikipedia
Massachusetts Compromise
The Massachusetts Compromise was the solution reached in the controversy between Federalists and Anti-Federalists in the debate over the ratification of the United States Constitution. The compromise ...
Privileges or Immunities Clause
The Privileges or Immunities Clause is Amendment XIV, Section 1, Clause 2 of the United States Constitution. Along with the rest of the Fourteenth Amendment, this clause became part of the Constituti...
Bill of credit
Bill of credit is a phrase from Article One, Section 10, Clause One of the United States Constitution. It refers to a document similar to a banknote that is issued by a government and designed to cir...
Jacob Shallus
Jacob Shallus (or Shalus; 1750–April 18, 1796) was the engrosser or penman of the original copy of the United States Constitution. The handwritten document that Shallus engrossed is on display at the ...
Eleventh Amendment to the United States Constitution
The Eleventh Amendment (Amendment XI) to the United States Constitution, which was passed by the Congress on March 4, 1794, and ratified by the states on February 7, 1795, deals with each state's sove...
Eleventh Amendment to the United States Constitution - Wikipedia
Contract Clause
The Contract Clause appears in the United States Constitution, Article I, section 10, clause 1. It states: The Contract Clause prohibits states from enacting any law that retroactively impairs contrac...
Timeline of drafting and ratification of the United States Constitution
The following is a timeline of the drafting and ratification of the United States Constitution. The drafting of the Constitution began on May 25, 1787, when the Constitutional Convention met for t...
Timeline of drafting and ratification of the United States Constitution - Wikipedia
Sixteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution
The Sixteenth Amendment (Amendment XVI) to the United States Constitution allows the Congress to levy an income tax without apportioning it among the states or basing it on the United States Census. T...