Uralic mythologies
Uralic mythologies is a cover term for the mythologies and indigenous religions of the Finnic, Ugric, and Samoyedic peoples, who speak related Uralic languages. The mythologies retain traces of archai...
Estonian mythology
Estonian mythology is a complex of myths belonging to the Estonian folk heritage and literary mythology. Information about the pre-Christian and medieval Estonian mythology is scattered in historical ...
Finnish mythology
Finnish mythology is a commonly applied description of the folklore of Finnish paganism, of which a modern revival is practiced by a small percentage of the Finnish people. It has many features shared...
Finnish mythology - Wikipedia
Finnish paganism
Finnish paganism was the indigenous pagan religion in Finland, Estonia and Karelia prior to Christianization. It was a polytheistic religion, worshipping a number of different deities. The principal g...
Finnish paganism - Wikipedia
Sami shamanism
Sami shamanism is shamanism as practiced by the Sami people. Though they vary considerably from region to region within Sápmi, traditional Sámi beliefs consist of three intertwining elements: animi...
Sami shamanism - Wikipedia
Uralic Neopaganism
Uralic Neopaganism is a category encompassing contemporary movements which have been reviving or revitalising the ethnic religions of the Uralic peoples. The rebirth has taken place since the 1980s an...
Uralic Neopaganism - Wikipedia
Estonian neopaganism
Estonian Neopaganism, or the Estonian native faith (Estonian: Maausk, literally "Native faith"), is the name, in English, for a grouping of contemporary revivals (often called "Neopagan", although adh...
Estonian neopaganism - Wikipedia
The Dragon of the North
The Dragon of the North (Estonian: Põhja konn) is an Estonian fairy tale, collected by Dr. Friedrich Kreutzwald in Eestirahwa Ennemuistesed jutud. Andrew Lang included it in The Yellow Fairy Book;...
Égig érő fa
The égig érő fa ("sky-high tree"), also called életfa ("tree of life"), világfa ("world tree"), or tetejetlen fa ("tree without a top"), is an element of Hungarian shamanism and native faith, and a ty...
Kalevi (mythology)
Kaleva - also known as Kalevi or Kalev - is an ancient Finnish ruler, known from the Finnish epic Kalevala. Kaleva and his sons are important heroic figures in Estonian, Finnish and Karelian mytholog...
Fragments of Lappish Mythology
Fragments of Lappish Mythology is the detailed documented account of the Sami religious beliefs and mythology during the mid-19th century. It was written between 1838–1845 by Swedish minister Lars Le...
Fragments of Lappish Mythology - Wikipedia
Hadúr
Hadúr, or Hodúr in old Hungarian, short for Hadak Ura, meaning "warlord" or "lord of the armies" in Hungarian, was the god of fire, later became a war god in the religion of the early Hungarians (Magy...
Finnish neopaganism
Finnish Neopaganism, or the Finnish native faith (Finnish: Suomenusko: "Finnish Faith") is the contemporary Neopagan revival of Finnish paganism, the pre-Christian polytheistic ethnic religion of ...
Finnish neopaganism - Wikipedia
Udmurt Vos
Udmurt Vos (Udmurt: Удмурт Вӧсь, literally "Udmurt Faith") is the ethnic religious revival of the Udmurts, a Volga Finnic ethnic group inhabiting the republic of Udmurtia in Russia. Among the Udmurts,...
Udmurt Vos - Wikipedia
Jelping-Ja-Oyka
Jelping-Ja-Oyka was an antagonist of the hero Mir-Susne-Hum in the Ugric mythology. His name means Spirit of Bear or perhaps Bear Spirit. In much of the mythology there are illusions to a relationship...
Mastorava
Mastorava (Масторава) is a Mordvin epic poem compiled based on Mordvin mythology and folklore by Aleksandr Sharonov, published in 1994 in the Erzya language, with a Moksha language version announced....
Metsänpeitto
Metsänpeitto (lit. forest cover) is a phenomenon found in Finnish folklore. It was used to describe people or domestic animals who went missing in nature for unexplained reasons.People "covered by for...
Uralic neopaganism
Uralic Neopaganism is a category encompassing contemporary movements which have been reviving or revitalising the ethnic religions of the Uralic peoples. The rebirth has taken place since the 1980s an...
Uralic neopaganism - Wikipedia
Finnic mythologies
Finnic mythologies are the various mythologies of the Finnic peoples , such as the Volga Finns, Baltic Finns, Permians, and Sami.The mythologies of the Finno-Lappic speakers have some common aspects; ...
Finnic mythologies - Wikipedia
Szelatya
Szélatya (or Szélkirály, Turkish: Yel Ata, Old Turkic: Çel Ede or Çel Ata) is the Hungarian god or deity of wind. He is a Hun (Onoghur) god too. In Turkic languages Yel (or Cel / Çel) means wind. The ...
Mythologia Fennica
Mythologia Fennica (Finnish mythology) is a book written by Cristfried Ganander. The book contains extensive explanations regarding Finnish mythology and is often seen as a dictionary. The book was pu...
Ipmil
Ipmil or Ipmilbalolaš means God in Northern Sámi. Ipmil has been used by Sámi Christians for God. The Creator and ruler of the universe. There are Sámi Christians who believe in Laestadianism that use...
Szelanya
Szélanya (Turkish: Yel Ana, Old Turkic: Çel Ene or Cel Ana) is the Hungarian goddess or deity of wind. She is a Hun (Onoghur) goddess too. In Turkic languages Yel (or Cel / Çel) means wind. The word A...