No true Scotsman
No true Scotsman is an informal fallacy, an ad hoc attempt to retain an unreasoned assertion. When faced with a counterexample to a universal claim ("no Scotsman would do such a thing"), rather than d...
Fallacy of division
A fallacy of division occurs when one reasons logically that something true for the whole must also be true of all or some of its parts. An example:The converse of this fallacy is called fallacy of c...
Equivocation
Equivocation ("to call by the same name") is classified as an informal logical fallacy. It is the misleading use of a term with more than one meaning or sense (by glossing over which meaning is intend...
Syntactic ambiguity
Syntactic ambiguity, also called amphiboly or amphibology, is a situation where a sentence may be interpreted in more than one way due to ambiguous sentence structure.Syntactic ambiguity arises not fr...
Loki's Wager
Loki's Wager, a form of logical fallacy, is the unreasonable insistence that a concept cannot be defined, and therefore cannot be discussed.Loki is a Jötunn or Áss in Norse mythology, who, legend has...
Fallacy of quoting out of context
The practice of quoting out of context (sometimes referred to as "contextomy" and quote mining), is an informal fallacy and a type of false attribution in which a passage is removed from its surroundi...
Fallacy of composition
The fallacy of composition arises when one infers that something is true of the whole from the fact that it is true of some part of the whole (or even of every proper part). For example: "This fragmen...
False attribution
The fallacy of a false attribution occurs when an advocate appeals to an irrelevant, unqualified, unidentified, biased or fabricated source in support of an argument.A more deceptive and difficult to ...