Wodenism
Anglo-Saxon paganism refers to the religious beliefs and practices followed by the Anglo-Saxons between the fifth and eighth centuries AD, during the initial period of Early Medieval England. A varian...
Wodenism - Wikipedia
Germanic paganism
Germanic paganism refers to the theology and religious practices of the Germanic peoples from the Iron Age until their Christianization during the Medieval period. It has been described as being "a sy...
Germanic paganism - Wikipedia
Anglo-Saxon Christianity
The history of Christianity in England from the Roman departure to the Norman Conquest is often told as one of conflict between the Celtic Christianity spread by the Irish mission, and Roman Christia...
Anglo-Saxon Christianity - Wikipedia
Christianization of Anglo-Saxon England
The Christianisation of Anglo-Saxon England was a process spanning the 7th century.It is essentially the result of the Gregorian mission of 597, which was joined by the efforts of the Hiberno-Scotti...
Germanic pantheon
The article lists gods and goddesses (Ansewez, Wanizaz) that may be reconstructed for Proto-Germanic or Common Germanic Migration period paganism, or which figure in both West and North Germanic mytho...
Female spirits in Germanic paganism
In Norse mythology, a dís ("lady", plural dísir) is a ghost, spirit or deity associated with fate who can be both benevolent and antagonistic towards mortal people. Dísir may act as protective spirits...
Female spirits in Germanic paganism - Wikipedia
Germanic poetry
In prosody, alliterative verse is a form of verse that uses alliteration as the principal ornamental device to help indicate the underlying metrical structure, as opposed to other devices such as rhym...
Germanic poetry - Wikipedia
Early Anglo-Saxon burial
Burial in Early Anglo-Saxon England refers to the grave and burial customs followed by the Anglo-Saxons between the mid 5th and 7th centuries CE in Early Mediaeval England. There was "an immense range...
Early Anglo-Saxon burial - Wikipedia
Magic in Anglo-Saxon England
Magic in Anglo-Saxon England refers to the belief and practice of magic by the Anglo-Saxons between the fifth and eleventh centuries CE in Early Mediaeval England. In this period, magical practices we...
Magic in Anglo-Saxon England - Wikipedia
Germanic king
Germanic kingship refers to the customs and practices surrounding kings among the pre-Christianization Germanic tribes of the Migration period (circa AD 300-700) and the kingdoms of the Early Middle A...
Dryhten
*Druhtinaz (Old English: dryhten, Old Norse: dróttinn, Old Middle English: drihten, Middle English: driȝten) is a Proto-Germanic term meaning a military leader or warlord and is derived from *druhti ...
Anglo-Saxon monarchs
A succession of monarchs ruled the various independent kingdoms which arose in England following the end of Roman rule in Britain in the 5th century. The most prominent of these kingdoms were Kent, E...
Anglo-Saxon law
Anglo-Saxon law (Old English ǣ, later lagu "law"; dōm "decree, judgement") is a body of written rules and customs that were in place during the Anglo-Saxon period in England, before the Norman conques...
Doom Book
The Doom Book, Code of Alfred or Legal Code of Ælfred the Great was the code of laws ("dooms", laws or judgments) compiled by Alfred the Great (c. 893 AD) from three prior Saxon codes, to which he pre...
List of places named after Odin
Many toponyms ("place names") contain the name of *Wōdanaz (Norse Óðinn, Old English Wōden).
Odensåker, Skaraborg
List of places named after Odin - Wikipedia
English toponymy
The toponymy of England, like the English language itself, derives from various linguistic origins. Modern interpretations are apt to be inexact: many English toponyms have been corrupted and broken d...
English toponymy - Wikipedia
Week-day names
The English language days of the week are named after gods and mythological figures, the product and confluence of an array of contributing cultures and traditions; while some other contemporary names...
Planetary hours
The planetary hours are an ancient system in which one of the seven traditional naked eye planets is given rulership over each day and various parts of the day. Sunday is always the day of the Sun, Mo...
Synod of Whitby
The Synod of Whitby was a seventh-century Northumbrian synod where King Oswiu of Northumbria ruled that his kingdom would calculate Easter and observe the monastic tonsure according to the customs of ...
Celtic toponymy
Celtic toponymy is the study of place names wholly or partially of Celtic origin. These names are found throughout continental Europe, the British Isles, Anatolia and, latterly, through various other ...
Celtic toponymy - Wikipedia
Germanic Heroic Age
The Germanic (or "German") Heroic Age, so called in analogy to the Heroic Age of Greek mythology, is the period of early historic or quasi-historic events reflected in Germanic heroic poetry.
The ...
Blót
The blót (Old Norse neuter) was a Norse pagan sacrifice to the Norse gods and the spirits of the land. The sacrifice often took the form of a sacramental meal or feast. Related religious practices wer...
Blót - Wikipedia
Germanic calendar
The Germanic calendars were the regional calendars used amongst the early Germanic peoples, prior to the adoption of the Julian calendar in the Early Middle Ages.The Germanic peoples had names for th...
Cumbrian placename etymology
Cumbrian toponymy refers to the study of place names in Cumbria, a county in North West England, and as a result of the spread of the ancient Cumbric language, further parts of northern England and th...
Cumbrian placename etymology - Wikipedia
Feria
A feria (Latin for "free day") was a day on which the people, especially the slaves, were not obliged to work, and on which there were no court sessions. In ancient Rome the feriae publicae, legal hol...
Feria - Wikipedia
Accentual verse
Accentual verse has a fixed number of stresses per line regardless of the number of syllables that are present. It is common in languages that are stress-timed, such as English, as opposed to syllabic...
Old English poetry
Old English literature (sometimes referred to as Anglo-Saxon literature) encompasses literature written in Old English (also called Anglo-Saxon) in Anglo-Saxon England from the 7th century to the deca...
Old English poetry - Wikipedia
Legal English
Legal English (Legalese) is the style of English used by lawyers and other legal professionals in the course of their work. It has particular relevance when applied to legal writing and the drafting o...
Norse paganism
Norse religion refers to the religious traditions of the Norsemen prior to the Christianization of Scandinavia, specifically during the Viking Age. It is a folk religion, which was not necessarily fo...
Norse paganism - Wikipedia
Continental Germanic mythology
Continental Germanic mythology is a subtype of Germanic paganism as practiced in parts of Central Europe during the 6th to 8th centuries, a period of Christianization. It continued in the legends, and...