The Top 6 Theories About The Lost City Of Atlantis
All that we know of the legendary island civilization of Atlantis comes from a few pages in Timaeus and Critias, two of the famous “dialogues” written by Greek philosopher Plato in the fourth century ...
Plato
The school founded by this antique philosopher, became a prototype of modern higher education. Contemporaries named him «the divine teacher»: in his works it...
Plato
Plato (/ˈpleɪtoʊ/; Greek: Πλάτων, Plátōn, "broad"; 428/427 or 424/423 – 348/347 BCE) was a philosopher, as well as mathematician, in Classical Greece. He is considered an essential figure in the devel...
Plato - Wikipedia
The Top 6 Theories About The Lost City Of Atlantis
All that we know of the legendary island civilization of Atlantis comes from a few pages in Timaeus and Critias, two of the famous “dialogues” written by Greek philosopher Plato in the fourth century ...
Hippias Major
Hippias Major (or What is Beauty? or Greater Hippias (Greek: Ἱππίας μείζων), to distinguish it from the Hippias Minor, which has the same chief character) is one of the dialogues of Plato. It belo...
Serenade after Plato's "Symposium"
The Serenade, after Plato: Symposium, for solo violin, strings and percussion is a five-movement concerto written by Leonard Bernstein in 1954. For the Serenade the composer draws inspiration from Pla...
Euthyphro
Euthyphro (/ˈjuːθɪfroʊ/; Ancient Greek: Εὐθύφρων, Euthuphrōn) is one of Plato's early dialogues, dated to after 399 BC. Taking place during the weeks leading up to Socrates's trial, the dialogue ...
First Alcibiades
The First Alcibiades or Alcibiades I (Greek: Ἀλκιβιάδης αʹ) is a dialogue featuring Alcibiades in conversation with Socrates. It is ascribed to Plato, although scholars are divided on the questio...
Second Alcibiades
The Second Alcibiades or Alcibiades II (Greek: Ἀλκιβιάδης βʹ) is a dialogue traditionally ascribed to Plato. In it, Socrates attempts to persuade Alcibiades that it is unsafe for him to pray to t...
Statesman (dialogue)
The Statesman (Greek: Πολιτικός, Politikos; Latin: Politicus), also known by its Latin title, Politicus, is a Socratic dialogue written by Plato. The text describes a conversation among Socrates, the...
Gorgias (dialogue)
Gorgias (/ˈɡɔrdʒiəs/; Greek: Γοργίας) is a Socratic dialogue written by Plato around 380 BC. In this dialogue, Socrates seeks the true definition of rhetoric, attempting to pinpoint the essence o...
Philebus
The Philebus (/fɪˈliːbəs/; occasionally given as Philebos; Greek: Φίληβος), is one of the surviving Socratic dialogues written in the 4th century BC by the ancient Greek philosopher Plato. Apart from ...
Atlantis
Atlantis (Ancient Greek: Ἀτλαντὶς νῆσος, "island of Atlas") is a fictional island mentioned within an allegory on the hubris of nations in Plato's works Timaeus and Critias, where it represents t...
Atlantis - Wikipedia
5040 (number)
5040 is a factorial (7!), a superior highly composite number, a colossally abundant number, and the number of permutations of 4 items out of 10 choices (10 × 9 × 8 × 7 = 5040).
Plato mentions in h...
Early life of Plato
Plato (Ancient Greek: Πλάτων, Plátōn, "wide, broad-shouldered"; c. 428/427 – c. 348/347 BC) was an ancient Greek philosopher, the second of the great trio of ancient Greeks—Socrates, Plato, and A...
Symposium (Plato)
The Symposium (Ancient Greek: Συμπόσιον) is a philosophical text by Plato dated c. 385–370 BC. It concerns itself at one level with the genesis, purpose and nature of love, and (in latter-d...
Symposium (Plato) - Wikipedia
Euthydemus (dialogue)
Euthydemus (Greek: Εὐθύδημος, Euthydemos), written circa 384 BCE, is a dialogue by Plato which satirizes what Plato presents as the logical fallacies of the Sophists. In it, Socrates describes to ...
Sisyphus (dialogue)
The Sisyphus (Greek: Σίσυφος) is purported to be one of the dialogues of Plato. The dialogue is extant and was included in the Stephanus edition published in Geneva in 1578. It is now generally ac...
Ancient Greek flood myths
Greek mythology describes three floods, the flood of Ogyges, the flood of Deucalion, and the flood of Dardanus. Two of the Greek Ages of Man concluded with a flood: The Ogygian Deluge ended the Silver...
List of manuscripts of Plato's dialogues
Some 250 known manuscripts of Plato survive. The following is a partial list of manuscripts of Plato's dialogues:
List of manuscripts of Plato's dialogues - Wikipedia
On Justice
On Justice (Greek: Περὶ Δικαίου; Latin: De Justo) is a Socratic dialogue attributed to Plato, but which is considered spurious. In the short dialogue, Socrates discusses with a friend questions ab...
Hermocrates (dialogue)
Hermocrates (/hɜrˈmɒkrəˌtiːz/; Greek: Ἑρμοκράτης) is a hypothetical dialogue, assumed to be the third part of Plato's late trilogy along with Timaeus and Critias. Since Plato never completed the C...
Plato's number
Plato’s number is a number enigmatically referred to by Plato in his dialogue the Republic (8.546b). The text is notoriously difficult to understand and its corresponding translations do not allow an ...
Stephanus pagination
Stephanus pagination is a system of reference and organization used in modern editions and translations of Plato (and less famously, Plutarch) based on the 1578 edition of Plato's complete works publi...
Stephanus pagination - Wikipedia
Ninth Letter (Plato)
The Ninth Letter of Plato, also called Epistle IX or Letter IX, is an epistle that is traditionally ascribed to Plato. In the Stephanus pagination, it spans III. 357d–358b.The letter is ostensibly wr...
Hipparchus (dialogue)
The Hipparchus (/hɪˈpɑrkəs/; Greek: Ἵππαρχος), or Hipparch, is a dialogue attributed to the classical Greek philosopher and writer Plato. There is some debate as to the work's authenticity. Stylistica...
Laches (dialogue)
The Laches (/ˈlækiːz/; Greek: Λάχης) is a Socratic dialogue written by Plato. Participants in the discourse present competing definitions of the concept of courage.
Menexenus (dialogue)
The Menexenus (/ˌməˈnɛksənəs/; Greek: Μενέξενоς) is a Socratic dialogue of Plato, traditionally included in the seventh tetralogy along with the Greater and Lesser Hippias and the Ion. The speaker...