Saijiki
A saijiki (歳時記, "year time chronicle") is a list of kigo (seasonal terms) used in haiku and related forms of poetry. An entry in a saijiki usually includes a description of the kigo itself, as...
Waka (poetry)
Waka (和歌, literally, "Japanese poem") is a type of poetry in classical Japanese literature. Waka are composed in Japanese, and are contrasted with poetry composed by Japanese poets in Classical Ch...
Hokku
Hokku (発句, lit. "starting verse") is the opening stanza of a Japanese orthodox collaborative linked poem, renga, or of its later derivative, renku (haikai no renga). From the time of Matsuo Ba...
Haikai
Haikai (Japanese 俳諧 comic, unorthodox) may refer in both Japanese and English to haikai no renga (renku), a popular genre of Japanese linked verse, which developed in the sixteenth century out of the ...
Bussokusekika
Bussokusekika (仏足石歌), also known as Bussokuseki no Uta, are poems inscribed beside the stone Buddha Foot monument at Yakushi Temple in Nara.Numbering twenty one poems in total, they are divided in...
Bussokusekika - Wikipedia
Harold G. Henderson
Harold Gould Henderson (1889–1974) was an American academic, art historian and Japanologist. He was a Columbia University professor for twenty years. From 1948 through 1952, he was the President of t...
Kireji
Kireji (切れ字, lit. "cutting word") is the term for a special category of words used in certain types of Japanese traditional poetry. It is regarded as a requirement in traditional haiku, as wel...
Utaawase
Utaawase (歌合), poetry contests or waka matches, are a distinctive feature of the Japanese literary landscape from the Heian period. Significant to the development of Japanese poetics, the origin o...
Utaawase - Wikipedia
Ryuka (poetry)
Ryuka (Okinawan: Ruuka "Ryukyuan poem" or simply Uta "poem"; Japanese: 琉歌 Ryūka) is a genre of poetry in the Ryukyu Islands composed in Ryukyuan languages. Ryūka is different from the tanka poetry of ...
Ryuka (poetry) - Wikipedia
Rokkasen
The Rokkasen (六歌仙, lit "six poetry immortals") are six Japanese poets of the mid-9th century who were named in the introduction to the poetry anthology Kokin Wakashū (c. 905) as notable poets of t...
Jo-ha-kyū
Jo-ha-kyū (序破急) is a concept of modulation and movement applied in a wide variety of traditional Japanese arts. Roughly translated to "beginning, break, rapid", it essentially means that all actio...
Nijō poetic school
The Nijō poetic school (二条, Nijō) refers to descendants of Fujiwara no Tameie's eldest son, Nijō Tameuji (1222–86). The family name took after Nijō district of Kyoto where the family had resid...
Tanka in English
The composition and translation of tanka in English begins at the end of the nineteenth century in England and the United States. Translations into English of classic Japanese tanka (traditionally kno...
Mono no aware
Mono no aware (物の哀れ), literally "the pathos of things", and also translated as "an empathy toward things", or "a sensitivity to ephemera", is a Japanese term for the awareness of impermanence (無常,...
Haiku
Haiku (俳句,  listen ,, haikai verse) (plural: same or haikus) is a very short form of Japanese poetry. It is typically characterised by three qualities:Modern Japanese haiku (現代俳句...
Matsuo Basho
Matsuo Bashō (松尾 芭蕉, 1644 – 1694), born 松尾 金作, then Matsuo Chūemon Munefusa (松尾 忠右衛門 宗房), was the most famous poet of the Edo period in Japan. During his lifetime, Bashō was recognized for his...
Matsuo Basho - Wikipedia
Jokotoba
Jokotoba (序詞), literally meaning "preface word", is a figure of speech found in Japanese waka (poetry). Jokotoba expressions are set before certain words, and makes use of wordplay through similes...
Jokotoba - Wikipedia
Kokin Wakashū
The Kokin Wakashū (古今和歌集, "Collection of Japanese Poems of Ancient and Modern Times"), commonly abbreviated as Kokinshū (古今集), is an early anthology of the waka form of Japanese poetry, dating...
Kokin Wakashū - Wikipedia
Rokujō family
The Rokujō family (六條家) was a poetically conservative faction in the Japanese Imperial court, founded by Fujiwara no Akisue (1055-1123 CE); it was the first clan to specialize in attaining power and i...
Yosa Buson
Yosa Buson or Yosa no Buson (与謝 蕪村, 1716 – January 17, 1784) was a Japanese poet and painter of the Edo period. Along with Matsuo Bashō and Kobayashi Issa, Buson is considered among the grea...
Kusamakura
Kusamakura (草枕, lit. "grass pillow") is a standard phrase used in Japanese poetry to signify a journey. It may also refer to:
Kusamakura - Wikipedia
Kigo
Kigo (季語, "season word") (plural kigo) is a word or phrase associated with a particular season, used in Japanese poetry. Kigo are used in the collaborative linked-verse forms renga and renku, ...
Kigo - Wikipedia
Tanka
Tanka (短歌, "short poem") is a genre of classical Japanese poetry and one of the major genres of Japanese literature.
Originally, in the time of the Man'yōshū (latter half of the eighth cen...
Masaoka Shiki
Masaoka Shiki (正岡 子規, October 14, 1867 – September 19, 1902), pen-name of Masaoka Noboru (正岡 升), was a Japanese poet, author, and literary critic in Meiji period Japan. Shiki is regarded as a majo...
Masaoka Shiki - Wikipedia
Senryū
Senryū (川柳, literally 'river willow') is a Japanese form of short poetry similar to haiku in construction: three lines with 17 or fewer total morae (or "on", often translated as syllables, but see...
Utakai Hajime
The Utakai Hajime (歌会始, First poetry reading) is an annual gathering, convened by the Emperor of Japan, in which participants read traditional Japanese poetry on a common theme before a wider ...
Utakai Hajime - Wikipedia
Makurakotoba
Makurakotoba (枕詞), literally pillow words, are figures of speech used in Japanese waka poetry, where epithets are used in association with certain words. Their usage is akin to “grey-eyed Athena” ...
Kakekotoba
A kakekotoba (掛詞) or pivot word is a rhetorical device used in the Japanese poetic form waka. This trope uses the phonetic reading of a grouping of kanji (Chinese characters) to suggest several in...
On (Japanese prosody)
The term "On" (rarely "Onji") refers to counting phonetic sounds in Japanese poetry. In the Japanese language, the word "on" (音) means "sound". It is used to mean the phonetic units counted in haiku, ...