Walt Whitman
Walter "Walt" Whitman (/ˈhwɪtmən/; May 31, 1819 – March 26, 1892) was an American poet, essayist and journalist. A humanist, he was a part of the transition between transcendentalism and realism,...
Walt Whitman - Wikipedia
Leaves of Grass
Leaves of Grass is a poetry collection by the American poet Walt Whitman (1819–1892). Though the first edition was published in 1855, Whitman spent most of his professional life writing and re-writing...
Leaves of Grass - Wikipedia
Patrolling Barnegat
"Patrolling Barnegat" is a poem by Walt Whitman, first published in Leaves of Grass.
One's Self I Sing
“One’s Self I Sing” is a poem by Walt Whitman, published in 1867 as the first poem for the final phase of Leaves of Grass. Although the general attitude towards the poem was not favorable, in July 185...
Pioneers! O Pioneers!
"Pioneers! O Pioneers!" is a poem by the American poet Walt Whitman. It was first published in Leaves of Grass in 1865. The poem was written as a tribute to Whitman's fervor for the great Westward exp...
Pioneers! O Pioneers! - Wikipedia
Song of Myself
"Song of Myself" is a poem by Walt Whitman that is included in his work Leaves of Grass. It has been credited as "representing the core of Whitman’s poetic vision."
The poem was first published wi...
Song of Myself - Wikipedia
Drum-Taps
Drum-taps is a collection of poetry by Walt Whitman first published in 1865.
On April 12, 1861, Confederate cannons fired upon Ft. Sumter signaling the opening of the American Civil War. Conseque...
Drum-Taps - Wikipedia
Calamus (poems)
The "Calamus" poems are a cluster of poems in Leaves of Grass by Walt Whitman. These poems celebrate and promote "the manly love of comrades". Most critics believe that these poems are Whitman's clea...
Calamus (poems) - Wikipedia
I Sing the Body Electric (Whitman)
"I Sing the Body Electric" is a poem by Walt Whitman from his 1855 collection Leaves of Grass.Its original publication, like the other poems in Leaves of Grass, did not have a title. In fact, the line...
Sea-Drift
Sea-Drift is the title of a section of Walt Whitman's great poetic work Leaves of Grass, first published in 1855. It is a compilation of poems referring to the sea or the sea-shore.Sea-Drift follows t...
Sea-Drift - Wikipedia
Out of the Cradle Endlessly Rocking
"Out of the Cradle Endlessly Rocking" is a poem by Walt Whitman.
The poem features a young boy walking on the beach, who finds two mockingbirds nesting and watches them. The female bird fails to ...
Out of the Cradle Endlessly Rocking - Wikipedia
O Captain! My Captain!
"O Captain! My Captain!" is an extended metaphor poem written in 1865 by Walt Whitman, about the death of American president Abraham Lincoln. The poem was first published in the pamphlet Sequel to Dru...
O Captain! My Captain! - Wikipedia
Sequel to Drum-Taps
Sequel to Drum-Taps, subtitled When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom'd and other poems, is a collection of eighteen poems written and published by nineteenth-century American poet Walt Whitman in 186...
Sequel to Drum-Taps - Wikipedia
Prayer of Columbus
"Prayer of Columbus" is a poem written by American poet Walt Whitman. The poem evokes the enterprising spirit of the Christopher Columbus in a God-fearing light, who rediscovered the North American co...
Crossing Brooklyn Ferry
"Crossing Brooklyn Ferry" is a poem by Walt Whitman, and is part of his collection Leaves of Grass. It describes the ferry trip across the East River from Manhattan to Brooklyn at the exact location t...
One Hour to Madness and Joy
"One Hour to Madness and Joy" is a poem by Walt Whitman.
This Dust Was Once the Man
"This Dust Was Once the Man" is an elegy poem by Walt Whitman in 1871. The poem is dedicated to Abraham Lincoln, the 16th President of the United States. The poem was written six years after Lincoln's...
Song of the Open Road (Whitman)
"Song of the Open Road" is a poem by Walt Whitman from his 1856 collection Leaves of Grass.
A Noiseless Patient Spider
"A Noiseless Patient Spider" is a short poem by Walt Whitman, published in an 1891 edition of Leaves of Grass.It was originally part of his poem "Whispers of Heavenly Death", written expressly for The...
When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom'd
When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom'd is a long poem in the form of an elegy written by American poet Walt Whitman (1819–1892) in 1865. It is a 207-line poem written in free verse and employing ma...
When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom'd - Wikipedia
Hush'd Be the Camps To-Day
"Hush'd Be the Camps To-Day" is a poem by Walt Whitman dedicated to Abraham Lincoln.The poem was written on April 19, 1865, shortly after Lincoln's assassination. Whitman went on to write additional ...